New to testing please help

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2012 8:10 PM GMT
    just got back from my test NEG at 38 days do i need to presume i am neg with this anti-hiv antibody combo test that i took.is this a fourth generation ab combo test? thanks for all your help i experence high anxiety and stress i am under dr care for that. Just answer my last question because i trust your opion. Also what does ANTI-HIV mean

    teste description was: Hiv 1/2 ab combo anti-hiv

    I have been told it was a 4th generation because it was a combo


    10. How long should I wait to test and what is the 'window period' ?

    We know approximately how long it may take a person to produce antibodies to HIV based on years of data, research and advancements in testing.

    A person who has contracted HIV may show up positive as early as two weeks after the time they were infected. According to page 11 of the Module 6 Training Manual from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the vast majority of those who contract HIV will show up positive between 4—6 weeks after infection.

    To obtain a reliable test result, it is recommended that you wait at least six weeks after your last exposure. A tiny number of people may not test positive for three months. These are generally people with pre-existing immune disorders such as chemotherapy patients or recent organ transplant recipients who must take immune system-suppressing drugs. For this reason, many agencies will suggest a uniform three month test to cover everyone.

    Testing beyond three months is completely unnecessary.

    Here is a chart with approximate accuracy of HIV antibody testing:

    Time Accuracy

    2 weeks…………………………50%

    3 weeks…………………………75%

    4 weeks…………………………95%

    6 weeks…………………………99%

    3 months…………………….100%


    11. Why do some places say to wait 3 months, 6 months, etc. to test?
    Science (even medical science) is not perfect, and cannot account for every situation a person may have going on with their bodies. For this reason, not everyone will have enough antibodies to test at the same time. Those with weak immune systems can take longer to develop HIV antibodies.

    Many resources lump everyone together to give one recommendation (for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this is 3 months). Some places suggest longer window periods because the staff may not be eeucated with regard to updates in testing procedures. Still, others may use the longer window period as an effective scare tactic for behavior modification. Overall though, six months is far more than anyone needs to wait.

    Ultimately, a person can only educate themselves by using resources like infectious disease medical professionals, state HIV hotlines, and local AIDS service prevention and education organizations to gather information and make the decisions that work for them. There are websites where questions can be asked and answered about HIV transmission, and that is the purpose of those sites. It's not the purpose of this one. This is a site for people affected by HIV to congregate and find support.
  • TufLuck

    Posts: 30

    Jun 13, 2012 9:17 PM GMT
    kbuddy77 saidjust got back from my test NEG at 38 days do i need to presume i am neg with this anti-hiv antibody combo test that i took.is this a fourth generation ab combo test? thanks for all your help i experence high anxiety and stress i am under dr care for that. Just answer my last question because i trust your opion. Also what does ANTI-HIV mean

    teste description was: Hiv 1/2 ab combo anti-hiv

    I have been told it was a 4th generation because it was a combo


    10. How long should I wait to test and what is the 'window period' ?

    We know approximately how long it may take a person to produce antibodies to HIV based on years of data, research and advancements in testing.

    A person who has contracted HIV may show up positive as early as two weeks after the time they were infected. According to page 11 of the Module 6 Training Manual from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the vast majority of those who contract HIV will show up positive between 4—6 weeks after infection.

    To obtain a reliable test result, it is recommended that you wait at least six weeks after your last exposure. A tiny number of people may not test positive for three months. These are generally people with pre-existing immune disorders such as chemotherapy patients or recent organ transplant recipients who must take immune system-suppressing drugs. For this reason, many agencies will suggest a uniform three month test to cover everyone.

    Testing beyond three months is completely unnecessary.

    Here is a chart with approximate accuracy of HIV antibody testing:

    Time Accuracy

    2 weeks…………………………50%

    3 weeks…………………………75%

    4 weeks…………………………95%

    6 weeks…………………………99%

    3 months…………………….100%


    11. Why do some places say to wait 3 months, 6 months, etc. to test?
    Science (even medical science) is not perfect, and cannot account for every situation a person may have going on with their bodies. For this reason, not everyone will have enough antibodies to test at the same time. Those with weak immune systems can take longer to develop HIV antibodies.

    Many resources lump everyone together to give one recommendation (for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this is 3 months). Some places suggest longer window periods because the staff may not be eeucated with regard to updates in testing procedures. Still, others may use the longer window period as an effective scare tactic for behavior modification. Overall though, six months is far more than anyone needs to wait.

    Ultimately, a person can only educate themselves by using resources like infectious disease medical professionals, state HIV hotlines, and local AIDS service prevention and education organizations to gather information and make the decisions that work for them. There are websites where questions can be asked and answered about HIV transmission, and that is the purpose of those sites. It's not the purpose of this one. This is a site for people affected by HIV to congregate and find support.


    The general rule of thumb is if you're sexually active you should get tested (full STD panel and HIV screening) every 3-6 months. You should also always assume whenever you have sex you're being exposed to something, common sense these days, and always practice safe sex/use condoms (also common sense).

    The reason for the 3-6 month rule is because everyone reacts differently when contracting either an STD or HIV. With STDs we know there are visible symptoms for many, but still there is a large portion of the population that can be positive with an STD and show zero side effects/symptoms and can unknowingly transmit the STD to others if they don't get tested regularly. Same with HIV, many assume when you contract HIV (seroconversion) you become really sick, which is a common sign after a person contracts HIV, but for many they never get sick or show any signs (i can speak from personal experience here). Also tests are not failure proof, can you can sometimes get a false positive or negative. Which is why most doctors suggest you get tested, and then have a follow up test 2-3 months later to confirm your results. Of course it isn't a good idea to have sex during this time because if you do test positive you want to know or at least narrow down your most recent sexual partners so you can follow up and confirm that either they gave it to you or you gave it to them through someone else you had sex with around the same time.

    It's always good to seek advice from friends and family but the best source is a good primary doctor you see on a regular basis.
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Jun 20, 2012 10:15 PM GMT
    ANTI-HIV

    Defined: This probably refers to the type of test you had. Meaning - Antibodies for HIV.

    Generally, there are two type of tests that are used for HIV: (1) Antibody tests - which look for something your body produces (antibodies) from the immune system if the virus is present; (2) RNA tests - which look for specific parts (proteins) of the virus itself.

    You most likely had a test which was looking for antibodies. If antibodies are found, they were produced because the virus was present. No antibodies found either (1) there was no virus present; or (2) the virus was present and your body did not have enough time between infection and testing to produce enough antibodies to be picked up by the test.

    WINDOW PERIOD

    Although 95% of the population who test will have detectable antibodies at the 90 days/3 months post infection mark, there are some individuals who do not have enough detectable antibodies until the 180 days/6 month mark. Not knowing who may be a part of that 5% clinics often encourage testees to return after 3 months "just to be certain" of the test results (if the test shows a non-reactive or negative result).

    Hope this helps with your questions.

    - David icon_wink.gif
  • tyler_helm

    Posts: 299

    Jun 20, 2012 10:21 PM GMT
    Testing on a quarterly cycle of every three months keeps you remembering to do it. Safe sex every time
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 24, 2012 5:48 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]dfrourke said[/cite]ANTI-HIV

    Defined: This probably refers to the type of test you had. Meaning - Antibodies for HIV.

    Generally, there are two type of tests that are used for HIV: (1) Antibody tests - which look for something your body produces (antibodies) from the immune system if the virus is present; (2) RNA tests - which look for specific parts (proteins) of the virus itself.

    You most likely had a test which was looking for antibodies. If antibodies are found, they were produced because the virus was present. No antibodies found either (1) there was no virus present; or (2) the virus was present and your body did not have enough time between infection and testing to produce enough antibodies to be picked up by the test.

    WINDOW PERIOD

    Although 95% of the population who test will have detectable antibodies at the 90 days/3 months post infection mark, there are some individuals who do not have enough detectable antibodies until the 180 days/6 month mark. Not knowing who may be a part of that 5% clinics often encourage testees to return after 3 months "just to be certain" of the test results (if the test shows a non-reactive or negative result).

    Hope this helps with your questions.

    - As far as the AB COMBO HIV1/2 test is this a forth genertaion?

    WINDOW PERIOD FROM THE CDC says at 6 week ( itesed 38 days out) will 4 days make a diffrence antibpdie test is 99% in a healthy person such as my self if you want the full article i posted it up a few pages im just courious abput weather i had a third genertaion test with the ab combo hiv 1/2 test. It was NEG At 6 weeks and i took a regular antibody test the same day it was also neg