MacBook Pro With Retina Display Torn Down, Virtually Unfixable

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    Jun 14, 2012 1:01 AM GMT
    Apple Care or some other extended warranty might be something to consider

    http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/06/macbook-pro-unfixable/

    Those who throw down more than two grand for a new MacBook Pro with Retina Display will have a hell of a time trying to fix their notebook should anything go amiss. iFixit’s latest teardown reveals the newest member of the MacBook Pro line is the “least-repairable laptop” the team has ever had to tear apart.

    The brand new MacBook Pro with Retina Display manages to pack a 2.3GHz Intel Core i7 processor, a massive battery, and a souped up 15.4-inch Retina display into a slender .71-inch thick frame. Unfortunately, when packing all those parts inside, Apple used a lot of glue and other techniques, like numerous pentalobe screws, that make upgrades and repairs virtually impossible.

    As in the MacBook Air, the notebook’s RAM is soldered to the logic board, so you won’t be able to upgrade or replace it. The SSD also isn’t upgradable at this point. The lithium-polymer battery is also glued in, which makes it difficult to remove without potentially dangerous battery breakage.

    iFixit also found Apple implemented an intriguing design in its exhaust air vents, forcing the air through a restriction before it reaches the outer portions of the vents. This creates a change in pressure that accelerates the air to push it out of the laptop faster.

    Apple talked about how it used a new display process on the MacBook Pro with Retina Display’s screen during its WWDC keynote Monday. Apple built the layers of the display into the unibody case to eliminate the need for a separate cover glass. Although this makes for a striking-looking display with lower glare and reflectiveness (thank goodness!), it means that if something manages to break the display, it’s going to be a very pricey repair process indeed. In fact, it might require a complete replacement of the laptop.

    The 2011 MacBook Pro — last year’s model — scored a very reasonable 7 out of 10 iFixit repairability score. This year’s MacBook Pro with Retina Display gets iFixit’s lowest score: a 1 out of 10.

    So, if indeed you do splurge, you’ll want to consider your future computing needs. And maybe store it in a museum-quality vault when it’s not being used.
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    Jun 14, 2012 5:50 AM GMT
    That is definitely the trend but as much as I loved the plug in component repairability of the original IPod they didn't last that long. I ended up with a pile of them for parts . My iPhones are way less repairable but they are still working. I still have my first iPhone 3g and is works fine jail broken on t mobile.
  • RollDontWalk

    Posts: 187

    Jun 14, 2012 6:12 AM GMT
    Well, that kinda sucks. I'm currently on my 3rd Apple laptop (2010 Macbook Pro) since switching in 2003 and all of them have had the HDD/RAM upgradeable (though some were harder to crack open than others and needed the keyboard, trackpad, top cover etc. to be removed just to get at the hard drive). The speed boost effected by upgrading to a bigger, faster hard disk and more RAM allowed me to get 4+ years of use out of them so this is a step backward in that regard.

    Soldering RAM to the motherboard is tolerable, as RAM increases by powers of 2 and we're already at 8gb and 16gb which is really a ridiculous amount. However not being able to upgrade the 256gb built-in SSD would be a real limiting factor for many people.
  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Jun 14, 2012 6:17 AM GMT
    Another overpriced toy from Apple.

    Oh but wait! This time we dunno how the fuck to fix it if you break it!

    22016459.jpg
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    Jun 14, 2012 1:31 PM GMT
    RollDontWalk saidWell, that kinda sucks. I'm currently on my 3rd Apple laptop (2010 Macbook Pro) since switching in 2003 and all of them have had the HDD/RAM upgradeable (though some were harder to crack open than others and needed the keyboard, trackpad, top cover etc. to be removed just to get at the hard drive). The speed boost effected by upgrading to a bigger, faster hard disk and more RAM allowed me to get 4+ years of use out of them so this is a step backward in that regard.

    Soldering RAM to the motherboard is tolerable, as RAM increases by powers of 2 and we're already at 8gb and 16gb which is really a ridiculous amount. However not being able to upgrade the 256gb built-in SSD would be a real limiting factor for many people.

    If this is the trend then you have to decide on the maximum configuration up front. It may also change the trade-off for extended warranties or insurance like Apple Care. I have never liked them too much because you usually lose money on insurance. To me it only makes sense if the loss would cripple you financially or if you are more prone to break things. But having to replace the laptop if anything happens might change my thinking.
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    Jun 14, 2012 1:43 PM GMT
    I've never broken a laptop. Including ones that have traveled with me to both Iraq and Afghanistan.
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    Jun 14, 2012 2:13 PM GMT
    The new MacBook Pro is in a category of its own, no laptop out there includes such power in such compact design. Yes the drawback of it being really difficult to fix is due to its design, its pretty much the only way to pack all these specs in the casing. Considering that Apple is one of the tech-companies with the best customer service there is I wouldnt see it as a problem. Obviously, for this laptop to be fixed it has to break first.

    The price mark at $2200 is not for everyone, it is a notebook for professional use not for you to browse the internet and check emails. It is not over priced, it is priced almost at the same level of the Macbook Pro with no Retina and it is $1000 cheaper than the price of the MacBook Air when it was first announced. Again not for everyone but not particularly overpriced.

    Try ordering it online today and you wont get one in months as it is sold out. Seriously this machine is fucking beautiful, makes other laptops look like toys

    macbook-pro-retina-xl.jpg
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    Jun 14, 2012 2:39 PM GMT
    charlitos saidThe new MacBook Pro is in a category of its own, no laptop out there includes such power in such compact design. Yes the drawback of it being really difficult to fix is due to its design, its pretty much the only way to pack all these specs in the casing. Considering that Apple is one of the tech-companies with the best customer service there is I wouldnt see it as a problem. Obviously, for this laptop to be fixed it has to break first.

    I agree with you completely, but it is important that this be known so people can make decisions on purchasing the machine, how to configure it, and what type of insurance, if any, is appropriate.
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    Jun 14, 2012 4:39 PM GMT
    socalfitness said
    charlitos saidThe new MacBook Pro is in a category of its own, no laptop out there includes such power in such compact design. Yes the drawback of it being really difficult to fix is due to its design, its pretty much the only way to pack all these specs in the casing. Considering that Apple is one of the tech-companies with the best customer service there is I wouldnt see it as a problem. Obviously, for this laptop to be fixed it has to break first.

    I agree with you completely, but it is important that this be known so people can make decisions on purchasing the machine, how to configure it, and what type of insurance, if any, is appropriate.


    True, people should always be aware of things like this, I just think that it wont be much of an issue. Ive owned a few Apple products and I have never tried to repair them myself, I always bring them back to the nearest Apple Store. Apple will either fix the problem, give you a quota for what needs repair that its not covered(damage) or it will simply give you a brand new device. I guess it would be advisable to get Apple Care so you get more coverage for a longer period of time.
  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Jun 18, 2012 4:35 AM GMT
    charlitos saidThe new MacBook Pro is in a category of its own, no laptop out there includes such power in such compact design. Yes the drawback of it being really difficult to fix is due to its design, its pretty much the only way to pack all these specs in the casing. Considering that Apple is one of the tech-companies with the best customer service there is I wouldnt see it as a problem. Obviously, for this laptop to be fixed it has to break first.

    The price mark at $2200 is not for everyone, it is a notebook for professional use not for you to browse the internet and check emails. It is not over priced, it is priced almost at the same level of the Macbook Pro with no Retina and it is $1000 cheaper than the price of the MacBook Air when it was first announced. Again not for everyone but not particularly overpriced.

    Try ordering it online today and you wont get one in months as it is sold out. Seriously this machine is fucking beautiful, makes other laptops look like toys

    macbook-pro-retina-xl.jpg


    If you know computers, then you know that Apple consistently overprices for the tech they offer.

    Retina display aside, there is nothing THAT fancy or special about this laptop (ultrabook). Oh but it's super thin you say? Check Samsung series 9 and Dell XPS 13 out.

    They don't have Ivy Bridge processors you say?? Hmm.. well wait till mid july when intel releases the fulll line up for all laptops.
  • Jaxom

    Posts: 118

    Jun 18, 2012 4:58 AM GMT
    TheBizMan said

    If you know computers, then you know that Apple consistently overprices for the tech they offer.

    Retina display aside, there is nothing THAT fancy or special about this laptop (ultrabook). Oh but it's super thin you say? Check Samsung series 9 and Dell XPS 13 out.

    They don't have Ivy Bridge processors you say?? Hmm.. well wait till mid july when intel releases the fulll line up for all laptops.

    This. Especially since Apple now uses the Intel processors just like everybody else.
    Really just paying $1000 more for cosmetic appearance and a little apple logo, something that doesn't even matter.
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    Jun 18, 2012 5:25 AM GMT
    TheBizMan said

    If you know computers, then you know that Apple consistently overprices for the tech they offer.

    Retina display aside, there is nothing THAT fancy or special about this laptop (ultrabook). Oh but it's super thin you say? Check Samsung series 9 and Dell XPS 13 out.

    They don't have Ivy Bridge processors you say?? Hmm.. well wait till mid july when intel releases the fulll line up for all laptops.


    Apple sells high-end products exclusively, every company that sells high-end products sells them for a larger margin this is not exclusive to Apple. All things considered Apple's prices move towards affordability. When the iPad came out with a $500 price tag pretty much every other tablet that came out that year was retailing for $600-$800. iPhone 4S competitors such as the Nexus and the GS2 also retailed at the same price of the 4S or more(eventually prices dropped quickly as it happens with all android smartphones). The Air is also not overpriced compared to similar spec ultrabooks. With the recent announcement of the MacBook Pro prices dropped once again for the MB Air and the MB Pro while packing much better specs.

    Apple products are more than just hardware specs, they are elegant, consistent, they offer a great user experience, they keep their sale value like no other electronic device out there and you get one of the best customer service there is. In 2012 computers are more than just specs. The MBP is a monster simply because there is no laptop with such specs in such a design and there won't be one for a while. Prices will drop next year once they update the entire line but for a new design this notebook may be expensive but certainly not overpriced that is until the competition can come close to offering, retina + similar specs + thin profile + build quality + 6h battery life for less.

    There is a difference between expensive and overpriced.