Oatmeal

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 4:53 PM GMT
    im curious i was raised in Europe and people find it odd the way i eat Oatmeal. i just add oats cold milk some raisins or blueberries and nuts. but from what ive seen everyone warms it n makes it all mushy here lolicon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 4:55 PM GMT
    Isn't what you describe also called mueselix (or something like that)? It's not unheard of in the US; but mostly, those who eat oatmeal do prefer it as "mush". I like it either way.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 5:04 PM GMT
    yeah but i didnt want to call it muesli because no one would know what it is haha
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 5:43 PM GMT
    I prefer eating my cooked steel cut oatmeal refrigerated with a dash of cinnamon and raisins so it tastes like rice pudding. That's odd. And in writing this post I'm struck by an inspiration; wonder how it'd bake or dehydrate as cookehs!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 5:49 PM GMT
    oatmeal cookies sounds good right now lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 5:58 PM GMT
    I eat oatmeel raw. icon_cool.gif
  • Koaa2

    Posts: 1556

    Jun 14, 2012 6:07 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidI prefer eating my cooked steel cut oatmeal refrigerated with a dash of cinnamon and raisins so it tastes like rice pudding. That's odd. And in writing this post I'm struck by an inspiration; wonder how it'd bake or dehydrate as cookehs!


    Have to try that, love rice pudding, thanks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:11 PM GMT
    truppensturm tres bon icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:21 PM GMT
    Oats, via their high fiber content, are already known to help remove cholesterol from the digestive system that would otherwise end up in the bloodstream.
    ....

    In laboratory studies reported in Surgery, beta-glucan significantly enhanced the human immune system's response to bacterial infection. Beta-glucan not only helps neutrophils (the most abundant type of non-specific immune cell) navigate to the site of an infection more quickly, it also enhances their ability to eliminate the bacteria they find there.

    According to study leader Jonathan Reichner of the Department of Surgery at Rhode Island Hospital and Brown University, priming neutrophils with beta-glucan helps these immune defenders quickly locate the bacterial mother lode within infected tissue. And this more rapid response to infection results in faster microbial clearance and healing. Since our non-specific immune defenses are the body's first strike forces against invading pathogens, starting your day with a bowl of oatmeal may boost your immune response in addition to your morning energy levels.

    .....

    Studies also show that beta-glucan has beneficial effects in diabetes as well. Type 2 diabetes patients given foods high in this type of oat fiber or given oatmeal or oat bran rich foods experienced much lower rises in blood sugar compared to those who were given white rice or bread. Starting out your day with a blood sugar stabilizing food such as oats may make it easier to keep blood sugar levels under control the rest of the day, especially when the rest of your day is also supported with nourishing fiber-rich foods.

    ......

    Oats and other whole grains are a rich source of magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body's use of glucose and insulin secretion.

    ......

    In addition to its fiber benefits, oats are also a very good source of selenium. A necessary cofactor of the important antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase, selenium works with vitamin E in numerous vital antioxidant systems throughout the body. These powerful antioxidant actions make selenium helpful in decreasing asthma symptoms and in the prevention of heart disease. In addition, selenium is involved in DNA repair and is associated with a reduced risk for cancer, especially colon cancer.


    http://whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=54

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:37 PM GMT
    oh wow thanks icon_smile.gif i didnt know that
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:44 PM GMT
    I grind mine into a powder and added it to my morning protein smoothy (with blueberries, kale, and sometimes pineapple)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:47 PM GMT
    RemyNicolei saidim curious i was raised in Europe and people find it odd the way i eat Oatmeal. i just add oats cold milk some raisins or blueberries and nuts. but from what ive seen everyone warms it n makes it all mushy here lolicon_eek.gif


    I have always liked it with plain yogurt and fruit. That is delicious!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:48 PM GMT
    hmm yogurt is good totally forgot about that yumm
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Jun 14, 2012 6:52 PM GMT
    Hot oatmeal is a lovely thing on a cold morning. Similarly, cold oatmeal is a lovely thing on a hot morning.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:57 PM GMT
    RemyNicolei saidtruppensturm tres bon icon_smile.gif

    yes it's pretty good, plus you don't have to go through the entire process of preparing and processing it, etc. just open box and start eating. don't expect to swallow much though, it mostly just sticks to the inside of your mouth and stays there.icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 6:58 PM GMT
    lol r we still talking about oatmeal?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 7:01 PM GMT
    RemyNicolei saidlol r we still talking about oatmeal?

    lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2012 7:02 PM GMT
    war ja nur ne frageicon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 15, 2012 12:46 AM GMT
    I like mine with an egg scrambled into it and lots of vinegary hot sauce, like Frank's or Crystal.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 15, 2012 12:47 AM GMT
    im sorry whats franks or even crystals?
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1765

    Jun 15, 2012 12:52 AM GMT
    Um yeah they're two different things. In Sweden, you can either eat raw oatmeal in milk or oatmeal in some kind of mix (muesli); but there's also oatmeal porridge which is when you boil it with water.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 15, 2012 12:54 AM GMT
    Danke schoen i miss Muesli haha
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 15, 2012 12:56 AM GMT
    Frank's and Crystal's are hot pepper sauces, like Tabasco but not as strong.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 15, 2012 12:57 AM GMT
    oh ok lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 15, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    I prefer to eat my oatmeal raw which milk and a handful of blueberries or other fresh fruit, just like any other cereal. I don't find cooked oatmeal that appealing. But when I do cook oatmeal it's always from steel cut oats and never that instant stuff. And I hate it when it's mushy. Plus it's better for you the rawer you keep it.

    One thing I like to do which you may find bizarre is I like to add raw oatmeal to my smoothies in the morning. As you're drinking the smoothie you'll occasionally get a tiny chewy piece of oatmeal to chew on which is kind of nice.