Forearms and wrists

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2007 1:03 PM GMT
    Now that I've gotten myself down to an acceptable level of not-fat, I've been trying to build myself up a bit. My arms are coming along gradually, but my forearms and wrists are disproportionately weedy. Are there any exercises that target these areas?
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Aug 09, 2007 2:13 PM GMT
    wrists are largely ligament and nerve and bone and don't change size much. That's why sites like

    http://www.sandowmuseum.com/ideal.html

    use it to calculate your ideal measurements.


    As for forearms:

    Anything with grip. So most of your arm excercises will work your forearms as an ancillary muscle.

    If you really want to target them, get a thin (say cotton clothesline) rope, a dowel, and a smaller dowel. Attach the two dowels to the ends of the rope. Push the small dowel through a 5 or 10 pound weight so you can hang the weight on the rope.

    Grab the large dowel with your hands on either side of the rope and hold your arms straight out. Turn your wrists to wrap the rope on the dowel and lift the weight to the dowel. Let weight back down. Rinse and repeat.

    Or you can practice hanging from things with an open grip until you fall.

    Worked wonders when I was in gymnastics.
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    Aug 09, 2007 2:49 PM GMT
    Thank you, kind sir. I shall get on it.
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    Aug 09, 2007 3:27 PM GMT
    I hope that I'm not hijacking this thread by asking the following question(s)...but they are related to how to condition forearm and wrist motions and power (in this case, for a specific purpose).

    The real-world application is analogous in some (but not all) ways to riding a sled prone along a rough curving track progressing down the side of a hill. More specifically, one is lying prone, supported by their legs, stomach, and both elbows in contact with the deck of the sled. The rider's forearms extend forward and each hand grips a (near vertical) handle that rotates about an axis parallel to the forearm and positioned just below it. Unlike a conventional sled, where the pair of hands normally work in unison to steer the sled, in this vehicle, each handle controls a separate function (e.g. roll and yaw or pitch in flying an airplane) via a rotation of the handle as described above.

    In general, the force required to rotate a handle is roughly proportional to the magnitude of the deviation of the handle from a vertical alignment of the handle (in either a clockwise or a counter-clockwise rotation).

    As our hypothetical sled progresses down the hill, the rough nature of the track produces vertical and lateral accelerations of the sled which, in turn, are transmitted to the rider's body via his contact points with the sled, and his gripping the handles. These accelerations are a combination of predictable and unpredictable (random) forces in both direction and magnitude. In some cases, they may be substantially greater in magnitude than the forces required to rotate the control handles.

    My first question is: What muscle groups participate in the rider controlling the sled (e.g. staying onboard while commanding the desired control inputs, and minimizing unintentional commands due to the accelerations) under these circumstances?

    My second question is: The rider inputs desired control function via a rotation of the handle about it's axis more or less parallel to the forearm. What muscles are involved in these rotations, and what exercises are appropriate to strengthen these muscles and preserving their range of motion?

    My third question is: What exercises would be most useful in conditioning the other muscles that participate?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 10, 2007 4:06 AM GMT
    Most serious body-builders like have thin wrists because it accentuates the musculature of their arms. Wrists are not something you can really build.

    As for forearms, try a reverse grip barbell curl.
    Start by holding a barbell with palms facing inward, about shoulder width apart.

    Now curl as though you were doing normal arm curls, the only difference is that your hands are in a reverse grip. At the top of the curl, your knuckles will be facing your shoulders.
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    Aug 10, 2007 4:21 AM GMT
    I would becareful working out hte forearms.. It is mostly slow twitch fibers and also combination fibers, which responds not as much to size training as fast twitch fibers such as your pecs...

    Overtrain of the forearm muscles will result in chrnoic conditions such as Golfers and Tennis Elbows... Sometimes even neurological conditions such as Carpal Tunnel and Entrapment of Meidan Nerve by Pronator or other liagmentus injuries such as Dequervains Syndrome...

    As far as riding a sled, I am lost with your description of the hand grips.. That is the problem of common language, it is not precise.. are your hands supinated or pronated or neural..? Are the wristsin neutral, or there is some extension, flexion, or Radial and Ulnar deviation..?

    If I understood what yourea describing more, I will try to see if I have some answers for you...
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    Jun 26, 2009 12:08 AM GMT
    Is there any way of making the wrist stronger ?

    I am doing strength training and when I am lifting weights my wrist make me have to stop, because My wrist get weak fast.
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    Jun 26, 2009 12:19 AM GMT
    I'm doing wrist curls and wrist extensions these days. They make a difference. I wasn't concentrating on symmetry and noticed a big difference between my forearms, so the other day I focused on my left forearm, and I can still feel it.
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    Jun 26, 2009 12:25 AM GMT
    what do u mean by wrist extensions ?
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    Jun 26, 2009 12:37 AM GMT
    Kneel beside a bench with a dumbbell in each hand. Place your forearms on the bench so your hands are on the other side with your palms face down. Start with your wrists bent as far down as possible and then extend the wrist out and up so it is as far up as possible.

    I use much less weight doing extensions than wrist curls.

    The wrist curl is the same motion except with the palms facing up.
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    Jun 26, 2009 12:39 AM GMT
    Wrist extension

    bench, dumbbell wrist extension weight training
    dumbbell wrist extension with arms on bench

    (Click on image to view this exercise...)
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jun 26, 2009 6:06 AM GMT
    I had a Marcy wrist and forearm trainer- really heled pump them up and aided in sports.
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    Jun 26, 2009 6:43 AM GMT
    wyrln saidWrist extension

    bench, dumbbell wrist extension weight training
    dumbbell wrist extension with arms on bench

    (Click on image to view this exercise...)


    Somebody who actually does them right.

    I've seen so many folks bastardize so many seemingly simple movements.
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    Jun 26, 2009 7:42 AM GMT
    Here are the forearm/grip exercises that I implement in my routine. I usually pick 3 or 4, and switch it up on the next workout.

    Wrist curls
    Reverse wrist curls
    Hammer curls with a rope and low pulley
    Bar hangs
    Plate pinches
    Wrist pronation/supination with a long bar

    At my desk at home and work, I have a couple of grip toys..

    Gripmaster

    gripmaster4.jpg

    Dynaflex

    dynaflexr.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 09, 2009 10:02 PM GMT
    thanks guys