Secular states/countries

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 15, 2012 8:08 PM GMT
    Among the most secular countries, Sweden and Japan are >70% irreligious.
    Oregon and Washington are two of the most secular U.S. states.

    Gallup Religiosity Index 2009

    Irreligion map

    Religious Prevalence

    Religions of the US

    Religions_by_State.PNG

    Church Attendance

    Church or synagogue attendance by state GFDL
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 15, 2012 9:12 PM GMT
    No surprise there
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    Jun 15, 2012 9:20 PM GMT
    Doesn't really paint an accurate picture when considering many countries like Japan still have a religious presence that doesn't conform to western standards of a god(s) based religions with an afterlife.

    According to wiki (not sure about accuracy) 83% of the Japanese population practice Shinto.
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    Jun 15, 2012 10:51 PM GMT
    ATC84 saidDoesn't really paint an accurate picture when considering many countries like Japan still have a religious presence that doesn't conform to western standards of a god(s) based religions with an afterlife.

    According to wiki (not sure about accuracy) 83% of the Japanese population practice Shinto.


    not sure of the accuracy of this.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Japan#IrreligionThe 2000 survey by the Yomiuri Shimbun found that 76.6% of Japanese do not believe in a specific religion.[24] The number increased to 72% by 2005, with only 25% believing in religion and 20% practicing faith.[26] According to Steve Heine in 2011, less than 15% of Japanese believe in God.[27]
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    Jun 15, 2012 11:00 PM GMT
    Shinto isn't always considered a religion.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/shinto/beliefs/religion.shtml

    This is the problem with polls. When an individual falls somewhere between that said person will be placed in the closest matching option. A spiritual person for example who doesn't attend church and does not count themselves a member of a particular faith - using the charts this individual would fall under no religion.

    I am not motivated to prove any of these charts wrong btw. Just point out some of the flaws.
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    Jun 15, 2012 11:49 PM GMT
    ATC84 saidShinto isn't always considered a religion.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/shinto/beliefs/religion.shtml

    This is the problem with polls. When an individual falls somewhere between that said person will be placed in the closest matching option. A spiritual person for example who doesn't attend church and does not count themselves a member of a particular faith - using the charts this individual would fall under no religion.

    I am not motivated to prove any of these charts wrong btw. Just point out some of the flaws.



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Japan

    "Most Japanese people do not exclusively identify themselves as adherents of a single religion; rather, they incorporate elements of various religions in a syncretic fashion known as Shinbutsu shūgō (神仏習合 amalgamation of kami and buddhas?). Shinbutsu Shūgō officially ended with the Shinto and Buddhism Separation Order of 1886, but continues in practice. Shinto and Japanese Buddhism are therefore best understood not as two completely separate and competing faiths, but rather as a single, rather complex religious system. Christianity also has an influence on mainstream culture."

    "Figures that state 84% to 96% of Japanese adhere to Shinto and Buddhism are not based on self-identification but come primarily from birth records, following a longstanding practice of officially associating a family line with a local Buddhist temple or Shinto shrine."

    "About 70% of Japanese profess no religious membership, according to Johnstone (1993:323), 84% of the Japanese claim no personal religion. In census questionnaires, less than 15% reported any formal religious affiliation by 2000. And according to Demerath (2001:138 ), 64% do not believe in God, and 55% do not believe in Buddha. According to Edwin Reischauer, and Marius Jansen, some 70–80% of the Japanese regularly tell pollsters they do not consider themselves believers in any religion."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shinto

    "There are currently 4 million observers of Shinto in Japan, although a person who practices any manner of Shinto rituals may be so counted. The vast majority of people in Japan who take part in Shinto rituals also practice Buddhist ancestor worship. However, unlike many monotheistic religious practices, Shinto and Buddhism typically do not require professing faith to be a believer or a practitioner, and as such it is difficult to query for exact figures based on self-identification of belief within Japan. Due to the syncretic nature of Shinto and Buddhism, most "life" events are handled by Shinto and "death" or "afterlife" events are handled by Buddhism—for example, it is typical in Japan to register or celebrate a birth at a Shinto shrine, while funeral arrangements are generally dictated by Buddhist tradition—although the division is not exclusive."
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    Jun 15, 2012 11:57 PM GMT
    There's a lot to take into consideration before you can make out these numbers. For one thing, many people claim religious labels for the sake of having one regardless if they're actual believers or even attend any religious services on a regular basis. Also, a number of countries have shifted their attitude towards religion in recent years, especially some of the former communist countries of Eastern/Central Europe and Central Asia.
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    Jun 16, 2012 4:25 PM GMT
    I wish USA was more secular. I can't stand when religion plays an important role in almost everything we do.
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    Jun 16, 2012 9:50 PM GMT
    Oh, those NW Pacific heathens. The lack of religion there helps to explain why Oregon and Washington are such pleasant states to visit. The Swedes always seem to be a very contented bunch too.
  • waccamatt

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    Jun 16, 2012 9:53 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidOh, those NW Pacific heathens. The lack of religion there helps to explain why Oregon and Washington are such pleasant states to visit. The Swedes always seem to be a very contented bunch too.


    Exactly; the less religion the better, as far as I'm concerned.