Question about muscle/fat

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    Jun 17, 2012 7:18 PM GMT
    Ok, so I've worked out for a long time, I have a good idea of what to do, but I recently took a test to see what body type I am. I'm a Mezo/endomorph.
    Basically says I put on muscle, & weight/fat easily. I have a slower metabolism also. I for the most part do what it says, which is eat more protein, lower carbs, more circuit training & cardio. The problem is I've been tryin to get a little bigger, which I've been doing by changing circuit to traditional lifting, it's working however I see myself putting some unwanted fat a bit also! Any suggestions on how to get he best results is much appreciated!
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    Jun 17, 2012 7:32 PM GMT
    When you switched back to traditional weight lifting, did you maintain the high protein diet? Did maintain the cardio, or decrease it?
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    Jun 17, 2012 9:36 PM GMT
    I did maintain the diet, & kept the cardio, but I see my thighs? Getting bigger & basically my flank, lower stomach area, it's really frustrating, because I like the gains in my chest & arms. Btw uptil about 7 years ago I was very over weight & lost over a hundred. Do you think that might have something to do with it?
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    Jun 18, 2012 2:04 AM GMT
    VieniQui saidQuestion about muscle/fat
    Muscle: Fun to grope and lick.
    Fat: Not so much.
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    Jun 18, 2012 2:34 AM GMT
    VieniQui saidI did maintain the diet, & kept the cardio, but I see my thighs? Getting bigger & basically my flank, lower stomach area, it's really frustrating, because I like the gains in my chest & arms. Btw uptil about 7 years ago I was very over weight & lost over a hundred. Do you think that might have something to do with it?


    Congrats on the results of your hard work!!! That's awesome!

    In regards to your question: It's really complicated.

    Yes, the confluence of you being an endomorph and once being heavier make it that much easier for you to gain the weight back (even more so than other endomorphs who may not share the same hx as you); however, simply increasing your emphasis on traditional weight lifting alone will not make you gain fat specifically, especially if you have maintained the same diet. You will gain muscle

    You know from experience that with circuit training you are keeping your heart rate up and forcing your body to work at a higher intensity for longer periods of time (at least that's how I was taught) and often with lower weight than you would with traditional lifting. That's why it is a good approach to use for people who are in a cutting phase of their workout cycles. With traditional lifting, the goal to is BULK UP LIKE A BEAST. You lift more but with more breaks, thus it is less cardiovascularly taxing.

    You are going to gain muscle with your current routine. And you will gain it faster than you will lose additional weight.

    I'm curious to know how you approached your weight loss/muscle gain goals.

    1. when you started lifting much more had you already reached your target weight? What was your %body fat? BMI?

    bes of luck to ya!
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:11 AM GMT
    VieniQui saidI did maintain the diet, & kept the cardio, but I see my thighs? Getting bigger & basically my flank, lower stomach area, it's really frustrating, because I like the gains in my chest & arms. Btw uptil about 7 years ago I was very over weight & lost over a hundred. Do you think that might have something to do with it?
    I think it's genetics. Your lower muscle groups are naturally inclined to develop faster than the rest of your body.

    How about going back to your circuit routine. And substitute one or two days with weight lifting. Or you can try alternating every other week. One week is circuit training, and the following is weight lifting, and so on.

    Also, you should maintain your high protein diet. But try to consume more carbs before and after your workouts, particularly on your upper body workout days.
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:30 AM GMT
    Thanks xrich
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    Jun 18, 2012 4:06 AM GMT
    i'm like you, and so is my buddy. however we're shorter and more compact, and you have a larger frame to put more muscle on.

    what my buddy does is go through building phases and then cutting phases. the building phase, he actually gets fat. he eats a lot, lifts max weights to failure, and low reps with super sets. he does big muscle groups and he puts on beef, but looks chubby.

    then he goes into a cutting phase, where he eats lean (paleo diet) with no carbs and he does more cardio, x-training, lower weight with higher reps, and shocks his metabolism to cut down the stored fat. whats left is beefy muscle mass.


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    Jun 18, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    You might try the "leangains" approach. Google it for more information. While there are a lot of people using this method for fat loss, it was originatlly geared towards helping to build muscle mass without gaining a lot of extra fat weight - the downside is you probably build muscle more slowly.

    As far as I have been able to gather (the guy who originated it was supposed to write a book but has never done so, so you have to piece things together from his website and from threads on fitness forums where people have tried it), here are the basics.

    Fast at least 16 hours a day, and eat your requirements during the other 8 hours. Supposedly there are some health benefits to the "intermittent fast" but the real reason is that it makes it easier to control your eating. For me, I would often have to choke down breakfast anyway, so skipping that is easy, and not eating after dinner is great because it gives me a reason not to raid the fridge for a bedtime snack. Also the meals you do eat are pretty big, so you feel satiated.

    Find your base "total daily energy expenditure" on a calculator like http://www.1percentedge.com/ifcalc/. Eat 20% above on weight days, 20% below on all other days. More carbs on weight days, more fats on other days, try to keep protein up all the time. You can adjust if you want to focus more on bulking, at the rest of a little more fat accumulation (maybe +30% on weight days, -10% on other days), or on cutting (maybe +10% on weight days, -30% on other days).

    Only light cardio on non-weight days, and make sure to completely rest a day or two each week.

    Focus on basic compound movements, lift heavy/low reps (5ish reps for first set), reverse pyramid (successively lighter/more reps for succeeding sets). Don't overtrain, maybe 5 or 6 exercises each session. Get in and out of the gym. If you work out fasted (like I do, early morning, and don't break your fast until later in the day), take 10g BCAAs before your workout and every two hours afterward until your first meal.

    I just started into this newly, but there is at least one other guy on the site (MuchMoreThanMuscle) who has been doing it for a while.

    Good luck!