X-Men & Gay Themes

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 17, 2012 8:37 PM GMT
    Well let me start by saying I'm a huge fan of X-Men, they're my favourite comics to read and when I was younger (like 12/13) I always caught the themes they showed through the fictional characters. One that really touched me around that time was the fact that they were fighting to protect people that hated them for being different. When I read that it kind of made me think that yeah it's OK to be different when you're OK with yourself and among others like yourself but we'll always be a minority, even when you're doing good things for the people around you. I see that today when they have gays in the army and people still hate them and want them out of there even though they're doing something the ones complaining wouldn't even do.

    The next one came from the Mutant Registration Act/Proposition X storylines where first it was mandatory for mutants to be registered and documented by the government, and ones that refused were hunted down and attacked. Then following up that storyline was Proposition X which enforced birth control on all mutants that were discovered as babies as well as when they tried to procreate. I've read stuff on here about the latter story, where some guys said that if the 'gay gene' were found it'd lead to some having abortions of those gay babies.

    So did any of you guys pick up on these themes and maybe feel like they could be a fore-telling of the future depending on who's in charge of big decisions like this in the future? Also, do you think that things will be like their world where mutants are still hated by humans for no reason, so in comparison gays will always be hated even if by a smaller number? I really wanted to bring this up after I watched X-Men: First Class recently because I felt like that show really tried to capture the idea of the hate the humans had against the mutants that even (at that time) Americans would join forces with Russians just to get rid of them.

    I'd love to hear you guys' thoughts on this!
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    Jun 17, 2012 8:39 PM GMT
    Every gay man in the world picked up on them.
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    Jun 17, 2012 8:40 PM GMT
    Have you heard of the Lavender Scare before. Look into that and then look at correlations between it and x-men. Crazy stuff icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 17, 2012 8:57 PM GMT
    Wow I never heard about the Lavender Scare before... I guess that it all really stems from hate and the fear of the unknown. This could have been the inspiration for the X-Men, maybe?
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    Jun 17, 2012 9:14 PM GMT
    Yeah a lot of people think that anti-gay sentiment was just religious and that's how it always has been. The first big anti-gay organization pretty much anywhere was the US government.

    There are sooo many gay/xmen parallels!
  • Just_Tim

    Posts: 1723

    Jun 17, 2012 9:27 PM GMT
    I wrote an essay about X-Men and social diversity for an Engliss II class and talked about this very thing... I didn't pay enough attention or catch on to the under tones as a kid...
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    Jun 17, 2012 9:47 PM GMT
    I picked up on it too, especially when I went to see first class at the cinema with my boyfriend.

    It's an interesting little social statement, though I guess since most people have something that makes them different which they've been picked on for its easy for most to relate in one way or another.

    Especially since X Men appeals to a demographic which, stereotypically, aren't the most socially aspirational.
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    Jun 17, 2012 9:54 PM GMT
    Sparks saidI picked up on it too, especially when I went to see first class at the cinema with my boyfriend.

    It's an interesting little social statement, though I guess since most people have something that makes them different which they've been picked on for its easy for most to relate in one way or another.

    Especially since X Men appeals to a demographic which, stereotypically, aren't the most socially aspirational.


    Isn't that awesome though. I think that makes the argument for the importance of pride in our community. Ugh so many guys think that being gay should just be who you have sex with and nothing else! But the reality is that we should be like the xmen and celebrate our differences. Using them to make the world a better place!

    If I were an x-men I would be storm. She's a fierce bitch and I love her.
  • ac416

    Posts: 273

    Jun 18, 2012 2:43 AM GMT
    SbStudent saidHave you heard of the Lavender Scare before. Look into that and then look at correlations between it and x-men. Crazy stuff icon_biggrin.gif


    Never heard of that before, thanks for posting. Interesting to read about and important to know. :-)
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    Jun 18, 2012 2:52 AM GMT
    Sparks saidI picked up on it too, especially when I went to see first class at the cinema with my boyfriend.

    It's an interesting little social statement, though I guess since most people have something that makes them different which they've been picked on for its easy for most to relate in one way or another.

    Especially since X Men appeals to a demographic which, stereotypically, aren't the most socially aspirational.


    Well for one I know Bryan Singer was working on First Class and he's gay so I guess he tried to put a lot into First Class, like where Beast said "you didn't ask, so I didn't tell" or something like that and the whole Mystique thing with "no more hiding" and Magneto's view of the humans hating them just like they hated Shaw, with no difference seen between the two parties.

    But when you think about it, mutants are hated obviously because they can be dangerous and also they're not fully understood by humans. Has anyone ever tried to link why people hate gays, besides the religious stuff? I always thought that the hate stemmed from religion but reading about the Lavender Scare, it has me wondering about the root of the hatred.

    PS: I'd definitely be Nightcrawler.
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:13 AM GMT
    x-men and discourse on gays/lesbians also heavily focuses on the genetic component, which is not that well understood in both cases. but the introduction of the genetic does not help either movements, as mutants are even further ostracized with a biological explanation to point to, and research on "the gay gene" hasn't really gotten us anywhere either..
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:14 AM GMT
    MarkRoger said

    PS: I'd definitely be Nightcrawler.


    he's a BAMF.

    ha ha haaaa
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:19 AM GMT
    homastj said
    MarkRoger said

    PS: I'd definitely be Nightcrawler.


    he's a BAMF.

    ha ha haaaa


    A bad ass mofo lol. I love Nightcrawler sorry and I love the bamf icon_razz.gif

    Who would you be?
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:40 AM GMT
    Great post! I was watching X-men 1-2 and X-men First Class last week with one of my close friends, which also motivated a similar topic for conversation.

    He's never read X-men comics so the movies and characters were kind of new to him. However, he knew right away that mutants life struggles related to many gay life issues.

    Ex: When Bobby (Iceman) finally reveals to his family that he is a mutant and his mother asks him, "Have you tried not being a mutant?". This scene shared similarities to how a gay son would come out to his parents.
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    Jun 18, 2012 4:16 AM GMT
    Wolfrain saidGreat post! I was watching X-men 1-2 and X-men First Class last week with one of my close friends, which also motivated a similar topic for conversation.

    He's never read X-men comics so the movies and characters were kind of new to him. However, he knew right away that mutants life struggles related to many gay life issues.

    Ex: When Bobby (Iceman) finally reveals to his family that he is a mutant and his mother asks him, "Have you tried not being a mutant?". This scene shared similarities to how a gay son would come out to his parents.


    Yeah I actually forgot about that... it's a shame though that some people don't see it and when you bring it up they think that you're just trying to make something 'gay.' I told my brothers about what X-Men was showing and they got all mad and said that they can't be something gay.
  • bolero_of_fir...

    Posts: 551

    Jun 18, 2012 4:32 AM GMT
    Wolfrain saidGreat post! I was watching X-men 1-2 and X-men First Class last week with one of my close friends, which also motivated a similar topic for conversation.

    He's never read X-men comics so the movies and characters were kind of new to him. However, he knew right away that mutants life struggles related to many gay life issues.

    Ex: When Bobby (Iceman) finally reveals to his family that he is a mutant and his mother asks him, "Have you tried not being a mutant?". This scene shared similarities to how a gay son would come out to his parents.

    Nice job skipping the third ” film”.
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    Jun 18, 2012 4:37 AM GMT
    bolero_of_fire said
    Wolfrain saidGreat post! I was watching X-men 1-2 and X-men First Class last week with one of my close friends, which also motivated a similar topic for conversation.

    He's never read X-men comics so the movies and characters were kind of new to him. However, he knew right away that mutants life struggles related to many gay life issues.

    Ex: When Bobby (Iceman) finally reveals to his family that he is a mutant and his mother asks him, "Have you tried not being a mutant?". This scene shared similarities to how a gay son would come out to his parents.

    Nice job skipping the third ” film”.


    Well I have to admit, as much of a diehard fan of X-Men I am, the third film wasn't all that good. I still liked it because Jean got a lot of screen-time but the execution was pretty bad. I think X-2 and First Class were the best ones.
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    Jun 18, 2012 4:59 AM GMT
    bolero_of_fire said
    Wolfrain saidGreat post! I was watching X-men 1-2 and X-men First Class last week with one of my close friends, which also motivated a similar topic for conversation.

    He's never read X-men comics so the movies and characters were kind of new to him. However, he knew right away that mutants life struggles related to many gay life issues.

    Ex: When Bobby (Iceman) finally reveals to his family that he is a mutant and his mother asks him, "Have you tried not being a mutant?". This scene shared similarities to how a gay son would come out to his parents.

    Nice job skipping the third ” film”.


    LOL He wants to see the third film, but i told him it's optional and he wouldn't miss much. Maybe I should just fast-foward to the good scenes for him. icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 18, 2012 5:29 AM GMT
    Wolfrain said
    bolero_of_fire said
    Wolfrain saidGreat post! I was watching X-men 1-2 and X-men First Class last week with one of my close friends, which also motivated a similar topic for conversation.

    He's never read X-men comics so the movies and characters were kind of new to him. However, he knew right away that mutants life struggles related to many gay life issues.

    Ex: When Bobby (Iceman) finally reveals to his family that he is a mutant and his mother asks him, "Have you tried not being a mutant?". This scene shared similarities to how a gay son would come out to his parents.

    Nice job skipping the third ” film”.


    LOL He wants to see the third film, but i told him it's optional and he wouldn't miss much. Maybe I should just fast-foward to the good scenes for him. icon_lol.gif


    Well he could still watch it, don't tell him it's not as good as the others because that'll just make him expect it to be bad. At the end of the day, Jean is in it so that's all that matters icon_smile.gif
  • rac727

    Posts: 196

    Jun 18, 2012 5:57 AM GMT
    hello XD
    x man and gay themes go hand in hand
    mutant powers manifesting during puberty=homosexuality manifesting fully during sexual awakening and puberty

    angel tying his wings down = transsexuals binding there breasts

    beast is gay

    mystique is bisexual

    public fear of mutants = homophobia

    mutants wanting to be treated like everyone else = gay rights

    icon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif
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    Jun 18, 2012 6:31 AM GMT
    acpreppy saidhello XD
    x man and gay themes go hand in hand
    mutant powers manifesting during puberty=homosexuality manifesting fully during sexual awakening and puberty

    angel tying his wings down = transsexuals binding there breasts

    beast is gay

    mystique is bisexual

    public fear of mutants = homophobia

    mutants wanting to be treated like everyone else = gay rights

    icon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif


    Beast isn't gay though... at least not that I've read recently. I know Mystique is bisexual. The gay characters I know about are Northstar, Ultimate Colossus and I think Quicksilver is gay in some alternate universe.
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:53 PM GMT
    SbStudent saidEvery gay man in the world picked up on them.


    Yeah, what he said.

    The gay subtext is one of the many things I love about the X-men movies - and I love 'em all.
  • Splendidus_1

    Posts: 611

    Jun 18, 2012 3:55 PM GMT
    "Mutant and proud" anyone?
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Jun 18, 2012 3:59 PM GMT
    Not just gay it was able to relate to any socially marginalised group which experience prejudice and discrimination from what was considered to be the primary and predominate norm within the population.

    X-men dated back to 1963 and fluffled as many ignorant feathers as possible. Always loved it for that reason.
  • marined8

    Posts: 81

    Jun 18, 2012 4:13 PM GMT
    X-Men also teaches you should be proud of who you are.

    Fight for your Freedom!

    Magneto almost had it right.
    even though I'm more on the Professor X side . I'm not also afraid to fight for my freedom


    Gay and Proud Baby!!!