Who has injured your rotator cuff?

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    Jun 18, 2012 1:56 PM GMT
    At what age, what happened when to cause it to tear, how serious? Did you get surgery, and how long did it take to get back to normal? How is it now? Noticeable? Thanks!
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    Jun 18, 2012 2:49 PM GMT
    .I had a slight tear in the back of my right rotator cuff. ( was distracted by this hot guy's crotch in my face during a bench press...that will ~never~ happen again! icon_eek.gif. I had to stop lifts that involved the rotator and stop swimming...basically nearly all upper body work. It was extremely painful and I had a lot of sleep-reduced nights and could not turn on my right side for more than a month, but I followed my trainers advice and he slowly rehabilitated it. It healed nicely and I did not need surgery. I was really really lucky. Now my left shoulder had a bad injury just last year. It was actually the teris major or teris minor, not the rotator itself. That took from June 2011 until January 2012 before I could swim again. I was in physical therapy for 2 months and obsessively did the assigned exercises. In Feb I could do a single pull-up (finally! I'm now up to 20 pull-ups). Now that injury is all but forgotten, but it deviled me every day for 7-8 months. Sorry to hear that you may need surgery, but I would strongly recommend a second opinion and a good PT.

    Best,

    Kevin
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    Jun 18, 2012 2:53 PM GMT
    I was 33 when the first injury occurred. No, it is not noticeable (maybe a bit or arthritis there, but not sure of the source).
    I was 51 when the second injury occurred. Yes, it is still visually noticeable (to me), but I'm doing a lot of trap and shoulder work to restore the symmetry. It also limits my range of motion in my left arm, but only very very slightly and is getting better all the time. One thing I learned is the shoulder is the most complicated joint and they are really funny...sometimes they recover with time and proper PT, sometimes they just need surgery.
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    Jun 18, 2012 3:02 PM GMT
    My current blog for rotator cuff surgery:

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/2330867/

    Don't miss the pics of my MRI, the suture anchors, and the very sexy sling. ;-)
  • real_diver2

    Posts: 88

    Jun 18, 2012 4:38 PM GMT
    Partial detach and a tear. 53 years of age.

    Surgery to repair. 5 weeks in sling, 2 months of physical therapy (by the way, NOT fun..but if you do the "homework" they assign, it goes quicker).

    12 months from surgery: stretching and light weights.

    15 months from surgery: lifting lighter weights in regular routine. Recovering losses.

    18 months from surgery: pretty much normal. A few angles of motion that were stiff and needed stretching.

    24 months (now): Absolutely normal. Back into regular routine. But I added a stretching routine for my shoulder.
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    Jun 18, 2012 5:04 PM GMT
    Yes, going through it now.

    No surgery, rehabbing myself. Keeping it close to my body, with minimal movement while home. Still working out and may have reinjured it last week going heavy again.

    So, this week I'll have to take it easy again.
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    Jun 18, 2012 5:06 PM GMT
    LOL! I initially thought the title of this thread was suggesting that someone fucked up my rotator cuff.
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    Jun 18, 2012 6:11 PM GMT
    There is an excellent book called the 7-minute Rotator Cuff Solution by Horrigan and Robinson. From it you can gain a complete understanding of the rotator cuff as it relates to a variety of training. You can learn simple brief exercises that will prevent injury, or assist in recovery. And you can learn which popular techniques contribute to injury, so that you can avoid them.
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    Jun 18, 2012 6:51 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidLOL! I initially thought the title of this thread was suggesting that someone fucked up my rotator cuff.


    Here too. Possessive pronouns cause so much trouble sometimes.
  • Koaa2

    Posts: 1556

    Jun 18, 2012 7:49 PM GMT
    Nivek saidThere is an excellent book called the 7-minute Rotator Cuff Solution by Horrigan and Robinson. From it you can gain a complete understanding of the rotator cuff as it relates to a variety of training. You can learn simple brief exercises that will prevent injury, or assist in recovery. And you can learn which popular techniques contribute to injury, so that you can avoid them.


    This is a review from Amazon about the book:

    This book was written by a chiropractor over 22 years ago. ALL copies of this book being re-sold are 1st editions, and thus contain info from the late 80's. If any new info is added, then its called a 2nd edition, which there aren't any (there are no 2005 editions). Thus, this is not a good choice if one is looking for the latest rotator cuff program because medical information is constantly changing all the time as new studies are done. Case in point, this book does not include the sidelying abduction exercise which has been recently found to be one of the safest and most effective exercises for the supraspinatus muscle, the most frequently torn cuff muscle. The sidelying abd. exercise does not grind your cuff tendons down further and cause more damage like some of the older exercises once taught like the "empty-can" exercise. Also. we now know that you really only need a few targeted exercises to rehabilitate the rotator cuff, and in fact doing too many can actually hurt you in the long run and cause you more trouble down the road.

    Now the book does cover some basic anatomy and function of the rotator cuff, so that's good. Also, be aware that as you progress through the many levels in the various routines, the number of exercises greatly increases (level 9 has a whopping 8 exercises for your cuff), so you're certainly going to be spending a lot more than a mere "7 minutes" doing exercises (obviously a marketing gimmick).

    Additionally, these exercises involve either dumbells or a pulley system, so you've got to have access to that equipment - and some of the exercises even require you to have someone help you. Readers might also want to check out Treat Your Own Rotator Cuff too - the exercises are much more in line with the current research, take much less time to do, and help many other types of shoulder problems you might have as well.
  • swall1963

    Posts: 161

    Jun 18, 2012 8:35 PM GMT
    August 2009 so I was almost 46. I was struck by a car as I walked across the intersection (it was a marked/four way stop - she didn't) I landed on her hood with a fracture in my humerus about a quarter the way up and torn rotator cuff. My ortho surgeon said it wasn't bad enough for surgery at this point so I did 3 months of physical therapy to rehab. It still bothers me some. My surgeon says I will need surgery at some point.
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    Jun 18, 2012 10:14 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidLOL! I initially thought the title of this thread was suggesting that someone fucked up my rotator cuff.

    Haha, so true. I thought it sounded strange when I wrote it. But I was too lazy to edit. LOL
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    Jun 18, 2012 10:16 PM GMT
    swall1963 saidAugust 2009 so I was almost 46. I was struck by a car as I walked across the intersection (it was a marked/four way stop - she didn't) I landed on her hood with a fracture in my humerus about a quarter the way up and torn rotator cuff. My ortho surgeon said it wasn't bad enough for surgery at this point so I did 3 months of physical therapy to rehab. It still bothers me some. My surgeon says I will need surgery at some point.

    OMG, I'm glad you're still alive! Hope your injuries get better soon.
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    Jun 18, 2012 10:17 PM GMT
    usguyingoa said.I had a slight tear in the back of my right rotator cuff. ( was distracted by this hot guy's crotch in my face during a bench press...that will ~never~ happen again! icon_eek.gif.

    Maybe a new invention is in order... WORKOUT BLINDERS. ;-)
    Thank you for sharing your story.
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    Jun 19, 2012 2:24 AM GMT
    Nivek saidThere is an excellent book called the 7-minute Rotator Cuff Solution by Horrigan and Robinson. From it you can gain a complete understanding of the rotator cuff as it relates to a variety of training. You can learn simple brief exercises that will prevent injury, or assist in recovery. And you can learn which popular techniques contribute to injury, so that you can avoid them.



    And this reviewer gave it 5 stars... icon_eek.gif ... plus it's expensive.

    "Most Helpful Customer Reviews
    20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    Outdated - Way More Exercises Than You Need To Get Better November 20, 2007
    By a trainer
    Formaticon_razz.gifaperbackThis book was written by a chiropractor over 22 years ago. ALL copies of this book being re-sold are 1st editions, and thus contain info from the late 80's. If any new info is added, then its called a 2nd edition, which there aren't any (there are no 2005 editions). Thus, this is not a good choice if one is looking for the latest rotator cuff program because medical information is constantly changing all the time as new studies are done. Case in point, this book does not include the sidelying abduction exercise which has been recently found to be one of the safest and most effective exercises for the supraspinatus muscle, the most frequently torn cuff muscle. The sidelying abd. exercise does not grind your cuff tendons down further and cause more damage like some of the older exercises once taught like the "empty-can" exercise. Also. we now know that you really only need a few targeted exercises to rehabilitate the rotator cuff, and in fact doing too many can actually hurt you in the long run and cause you more trouble down the road.

    Now the book does cover some basic anatomy and function of the rotator cuff, so that's good. Also, be aware that as you progress through the many levels in the various routines, the number of exercises greatly increases (level 9 has a whopping 8 exercises for your cuff), so you're certainly going to be spending a lot more than a mere "7 minutes" doing exercises (obviously a marketing gimmick).

    Additionally, these exercises involve either dumbells or a pulley system, so you've got to have access to that equipment - and some of the exercises even require you to have someone help you. Readers might also want to check out Treat Your Own Rotator Cuff too - the exercises are much more in line with the current research, take much less time to do, and help many other types of shoulder problems you might have as well."