Anyone work in law enforcement?

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    Jun 19, 2012 3:23 PM GMT
    Are there any sworn law enforcement officers here on RJ? I've been contemplating a career switch to criminal justice (particularly forensics and crime scene processing), and I'd like to get some perspective from guys who've been in the field for awhile.
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    Jun 19, 2012 3:46 PM GMT
    Go somewhere there is a lot of crime?


    Bromoflexual saidAre there any sworn law enforcement officers here on RJ? I've been contemplating a career switch to criminal justice (particularly forensics and crime scene processing), and I'd like to get some perspective from guys who've been in the field for awhile.
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    Jun 19, 2012 3:54 PM GMT
    Im a federal law enforcement officer in the Coast Guard (BTM level). So I can make inquiries, examinations, inspections, searches, seizures, and arrests on the high seas and waters over which the United States has jurisdiction, for the prevention, detection, and suppression of violations of laws of the United States. We get our authority from 14 USC 89A.
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    Jun 20, 2012 2:35 AM GMT
    bump
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    Jun 20, 2012 2:40 AM GMT
    In my private investigator thread I remember art_deco mention he had law enforcement and/or military background.
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    Jun 20, 2012 2:42 AM GMT
    I'm quite interested in any perspective as well since it's what I have my bachelors in. icon_cool.gif
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    Jun 20, 2012 2:43 AM GMT
    I let a cop blow me off one time to avoid a ticket. Like srsly. Does that count?
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    Jun 20, 2012 2:53 AM GMT
    mortal12 saidIn my private investigator thread I remember art_deco mention he had law enforcement and/or military background.


    Art_Deco mentions a lot of things
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Jun 20, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    Ariodante said
    mortal12 saidIn my private investigator thread I remember art_deco mention he had law enforcement and/or military background.


    Art_Deco mentions a lot of things


    Like this one time in band camp...
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    Jun 20, 2012 3:33 AM GMT
    IceBucket saidI'm quite interested in any perspective as well since it's what I have my bachelors in. icon_cool.gif


    usajobs.gov bro and also i hear that alot of federal agencies are starting to accept the STEP program where students can get paid intern or fellowships with a chance to be converted to full time within the agency

    i'm a CRJ major as well
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    Jul 06, 2012 3:47 PM GMT
    Bump.
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    Jul 06, 2012 3:57 PM GMT
    Ariodante said
    mortal12 saidIn my private investigator thread I remember art_deco mention he had law enforcement and/or military background.


    Art_Deco mentions a lot of things


    MeanGirlsLaugh.gif
  • mybud

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    Jul 06, 2012 3:58 PM GMT
    Nahhh but I have a badge and handcuffs...
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    Jul 06, 2012 4:06 PM GMT
    mybud saidNahhh but I have a badge and handcuffs...


    Oh? Do tell...

    ...actually...just STFU and cuff me plz icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 06, 2012 4:17 PM GMT
    I was a military policeman and investigator for 25 years.

    Crime scene examination/investigation is the use of specialised techniques (e.g. fingerprint recovery, DNA recovery) while searching and examining a scene, in order to find, preserve and record evidence in relation to an alleged crime.

    The route to a career in crime scene examination varies, depending on the jurisdiction, but you can often get into it via a career in law enforcement. In other words, once you have gained sufficient experience as a police (peace) officer (civilian or military), you can apply to attend a crime scene examiner's course, on successful completion of which, you will be employed (supervised and eventually solo) on such duties.

    While I am not a crime scene examiner, I have worked with them a lot. The main attributes for the job are, as you might expect: patience, attention to detail, a methodical approach, excellent record keeping, flexibility (You will find yourself on duty/on call during weekends, public holidays and nights) and excellent verbal and written communication (You will be required to produce written reports and to give evidence in writing and sometimes verbally in court).

    A forensic scientist has more of a lab-based role, usually examining or analysing exhibits recovered by a police officer or crime scene examiner. The path to a forensic science career is a good science degree, followed by specialist education and training, followed by employment in a crime lab.
  • irishguy202

    Posts: 313

    Jul 06, 2012 4:48 PM GMT
    I used to work for the Townsend Agency as a P.I. until I was replaced by these three hot dames that fight crime in heals and perectly teased hair...oh wait, that's Charlies Angels isnt it. I guess I don't then. ;)
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    Jul 07, 2012 2:59 AM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidI was a military policeman and investigator for 25 years.

    Crime scene examination/investigation is the use of specialised techniques (e.g. fingerprint recovery, DNA recovery) while searching and examining a scene, in order to find, preserve and record evidence in relation to an alleged crime.

    The route to a career in crime scene examination varies, depending on the jurisdiction, but you can often get into it via a career in law enforcement. In other words, once you have gained sufficient experience as a police (peace) officer (civilian or military), you can apply to attend a crime scene examiner's course, on successful completion of which, you will be employed (supervised and eventually solo) on such duties.

    While I am not a crime scene examiner, I have worked with them a lot. The main attributes for the job are, as you might expect: patience, attention to detail, a methodical approach, excellent record keeping, flexibility (You will find yourself on duty/on call during weekends, public holidays and nights) and excellent verbal and written communication (You will be required to produce written reports and to give evidence in writing and sometimes verbally in court).

    A forensic scientist has more of a lab-based role, usually examining or analysing exhibits recovered by a police officer or crime scene examiner. The path to a forensic science career is a good science degree, followed by specialist education and training, followed by employment in a crime lab.


    Do you have any insight on how to get hands on experience in the field right now? I've finished my BS in Molecular Biology and just finished a MS in Pharmacology. I have plenty of academic lab experience, but I'm having trouble getting experience in a DNA forensics lab.

    Also, would the military be a good place to find training? Even "entry" level jobs working for the USACIL or NCIS require one or more years of experience working in a forensics lab.

    I'm have a real tough time getting my foot in the door. =/
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    Jul 07, 2012 3:25 AM GMT
    Bromoflexual said
    Ex_Mil8 saidI was a military policeman and investigator for 25 years.

    Crime scene examination/investigation is the use of specialised techniques (e.g. fingerprint recovery, DNA recovery) while searching and examining a scene, in order to find, preserve and record evidence in relation to an alleged crime.

    The route to a career in crime scene examination varies, depending on the jurisdiction, but you can often get into it via a career in law enforcement. In other words, once you have gained sufficient experience as a police (peace) officer (civilian or military), you can apply to attend a crime scene examiner's course, on successful completion of which, you will be employed (supervised and eventually solo) on such duties.

    While I am not a crime scene examiner, I have worked with them a lot. The main attributes for the job are, as you might expect: patience, attention to detail, a methodical approach, excellent record keeping, flexibility (You will find yourself on duty/on call during weekends, public holidays and nights) and excellent verbal and written communication (You will be required to produce written reports and to give evidence in writing and sometimes verbally in court).

    A forensic scientist has more of a lab-based role, usually examining or analysing exhibits recovered by a police officer or crime scene examiner. The path to a forensic science career is a good science degree, followed by specialist education and training, followed by employment in a crime lab.


    Do you have any insight on how to get hands on experience in the field right now? I've finished my BS in Molecular Biology and just finished a MS in Pharmacology. I have plenty of academic lab experience, but I'm having trouble getting experience in a DNA forensics lab.

    Also, would the military be a good place to find training? Even "entry" level jobs working for the USACIL or NCIS require one or more years of experience working in a forensics lab.

    I'm have a real tough time getting my foot in the door. =/



    Connections man. CRJ is generally very broad but it's also a small tight circle. Do you have any contacts in law enforcement at all? if not the people with prior experience should have contacts that can help ypu
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    Jul 07, 2012 3:42 AM GMT
    tmac said

    Connections man. CRJ is generally very broad but it's also a small tight circle. Do you have any contacts in law enforcement at all? if not the people with prior experience should have contacts that can help ypu


    I have two main connections in forensics that are both DNA criminalists. One is an old high school classmate that was deadset on doing forensics before she even graduated HS. The other is a friend of a friend. It seems the best they can do is give me tips on how to pass written exams and interviews for criminalist/lab tech positions.

    I'm trying to sign up for volunteer work and internships with forensics divisions at local police departments to get more law enforcement contacts. Though these are normally reserved for currently-enrolled college students pursuing criminal justice degrees.
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    Jul 07, 2012 3:48 AM GMT
    ConfederateGhost saidGo somewhere there is a lot of crime?

    But the winters are long and cold here in Detroit.
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    Jul 07, 2012 3:50 AM GMT
    Uniforms are hot! I sure hope there are men in uniforms on this site! Woof! icon_biggrin.gificon_cool.gificon_twisted.gif
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    Jul 07, 2012 8:21 AM GMT
    METAMORPH said
    Ariodante said
    mortal12 saidIn my private investigator thread I remember art_deco mention he had law enforcement and/or military background.


    Art_Deco mentions a lot of things


    MeanGirlsLaugh.gif


    imager.php?id=1189382&t=o
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 07, 2012 8:46 AM GMT
    I only enforce the laws of fashion.
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    Jul 07, 2012 8:52 AM GMT
    Anduru saidI only enforce the laws of fashion.


    Sometimes I wish this was enforceable.
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    Jul 07, 2012 8:53 AM GMT
    There are quite a few of us on here. I am most definitely in the law enforcement field. Email me if you have questions.