Do You Believe In Corporal Punishment?

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    Jun 20, 2012 7:59 PM GMT
    I think a paddle would serve very well here.

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    Jun 20, 2012 8:06 PM GMT
    I truly hope the school district she works for saw this and responded... smh... icon_sad.gif
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:07 PM GMT
    omg I stopped watching 30 seconds in i couldn't watch more. I feel so bad for that woman. I don't think corporal punishment is the answer. Just better parenting. Contrary to the shift in blame to schools and teachers and just about anyone parents can pin it on, its usually the parents fault when kids act badly. Thats not to say there aren't some handful children but they're the exception while bad parents are the norm.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:08 PM GMT
    ABSOLUTELY!
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:08 PM GMT
    Didn't really need to see a video of elder abuse today...=s
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:11 PM GMT
    When I lived towards Charlotte back in the 90s, I got paddled or spanked like 6 times for outbursts in class...................I swear the principal liked spanking me wayyyyyyy too much icon_confused.gif it hurts like hell, so no...I don't think anyone but the parent has the right to it.


    The way they were treating this lady.........icon_evil.gif
  • TheBizMan

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    Jun 20, 2012 8:11 PM GMT
    Wtf is going on here?

    Why is she just sitting there?

    Why isn't anybody kicking these children's teeth in?
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:13 PM GMT
    In my Mama voice: They need they ass beat! Little bastards

    OP yes i do
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:14 PM GMT
    They need a can of whoop-ass for their little brains. What is wrong with these kids.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:15 PM GMT
    No i don't. Hitting a child is more than likely going to result in insecurity, low self esteem and the idea that violence is necessary to prove a point and affect change.

    However..These children are clearly abusive and they learn from their parents how to treat other people.. and most likely their parents are just as disrespectful. We are in the age where bullying makes front page news and still we have kids doing shit like this. Harassment laws should be strengthened and applied to minors.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:16 PM GMT
    On topic, our 4th grade teacher pulled our hair for random shit like getting our math wrong. He never did it to me because I made sure I got my math right out of fear of receiving physical abuse, but he did it to my best friend and made him cry from the pain.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:16 PM GMT
    uoft23 saidomg I stopped watching 30 seconds in i couldn't watch more. I feel so bad for that woman. I don't think corporal punishment is the answer. Just better parenting. Contrary to the shift in blame to schools and teachers and just about anyone parents can pin it on, its usually the parents fault when kids act badly. Thats not to say there aren't some handful children but they're the exception while bad parents are the norm.


    Claiming that better parenting is the answer is a cop-out though, because clearly that isn't happening. It's equivalent to saying that nothing should be done. And in this case at least it happened to an adult who can remove herself from the situation, sad as this may be. This is why some people commit suicide, for Chrissakes.

    Our first duty is to raise children to be productive, positive contributors to society who don't harm others. If we can also make them happy, grand. But let's keep our eyes on the prize.

    So I'm not too worried about shattering their sense of safety or harming their fragile little egos. I'm not saying chewing bubblegum in the hall should be a capital offense here, but I do think that some people, unfortunately, don't respond to traditional punishment. If you think this is the first time these kids have seen the inside of a principal's office, you're dreaming.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:16 PM GMT
    omg seriously theres a lot of arabic kids doing this
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:17 PM GMT
    BlackCat90 saidWhen I lived towards Charlotte back in the 90s, I got paddled or spanked like 6 times for outbursts in class...................I swear the principal liked spanking me wayyyyyyy too much icon_confused.gif it hurts like hell, so no...I don't think anyone but the parent has the right to it.


    The way they were treating this lady.........icon_evil.gif


    So after six times, did you stop having outbursts in class? If so, mission accomplished.

    Also, I would argue that parents are precisely the people who shouldn't engage in corporal punishment. It should be an independent authority who is unbiased - it is a punishment. Do we allow criminals to be punished by their families, or by a judicial system? You also get confounding factors like abusive parents who are likely to use corporal punishment in improper context.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:21 PM GMT
    principal0 said
    BlackCat90 saidWhen I lived towards Charlotte back in the 90s, I got paddled or spanked like 6 times for outbursts in class...................I swear the principal liked spanking me wayyyyyyy too much icon_confused.gif it hurts like hell, so no...I don't think anyone but the parent has the right to it.


    The way they were treating this lady.........icon_evil.gif


    So after six times, did you stop having outbursts in class? If so, mission accomplished.


    this was in elementary school and all but one of the outbursts were close to the end of the year....I was getting ready to transition into 3rd grade, so I guess it worked?? I dunno. I still don't agree with it. My parents agree wholeheartedly with it icon_rolleyes.gif but it wasn't their asses that got beat....
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:22 PM GMT
    Ariodante saidOn topic, our 4th grade teacher pulled our hair for random shit like getting our math wrong. He never did it to me because I made sure I got my math right out of fear of receiving physical abuse, but he did it to my best friend and made him cry from the pain.


    I think it's fair to say that the ability to administer the punishment should reside with a central authority, like a principal or dean, and must conform to procedure for behavioral problems. A referral from the teacher, with evaluation by the dean ought to be the policy IMHO.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:23 PM GMT
    Oh and i will add, this speaks more of the individual messages we send out... like that of obesity. There was a thread here about "should the fat fly" which the average message was highly critical of the overwieght without an OUNCE of empathy...and in favor of charging them and teaching them "a lesson"... those attitudes get picked up by children and harassing someone for being fat is one of the last excusable forms of harassment in our society. This woman being bullied is no different than her being gay in this context. She just an old woman doing her job. But kids see we make fun of fat people all the time.. we even demonize them and lump them up into being merely lazy and thus pathetic human beings worthy of being taunted. THATS the message we get. So corporeal punishment is rather an ineffective thought.. the first thought should be..maybe WE shouldn't bad mouth the over weight and provide the idea that it's ok to treat them inferior in our daily lives, online and in the media.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:28 PM GMT
    I wasn't raised in the US, and my 1st thru 12th grade was at a semi-military prep school in Mexico. Any one year I did there was 10x as hard as all my US college years put together. We weren't coddled, we were pushed, and we were constantly told that we were being prepared to take on the world. Some kids got smacked here and there, we were constantly put in brutal competition with each other, public humiliation was our bread and butter. All done to push us to achieve our greatest possible excellence. It's a very different way of teaching and educating. Its' a "suck it up you piece of shit this isn't going to kill you it's going to make you be the best person you can possibly be in this life" methodology that you'll never see in the US lest a thousands lawsuits be filed because the precious children aren't being cradled in silk swaths.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:29 PM GMT
    JackKash saidOh and i will add, this speaks more of the individual messages we send out... like that of obesity. There was a thread here about "should the fat fly" which the average message was highly critical of the overwieght without an OUNCE of empathy...and in favor of charging them and teaching them "a lesson"... those attitudes get picked up by children and harassing someone for being fat is one of the last excusable forms of harassment in our society. This woman being bullied is no different than her being gay in this context. She just an old woman doing her job. But kids see we make fun of fat people all the time.. we even demonize them and lump them up into being merely lazy and thus pathetic human beings worthy of being taunted. THATS the message we get. So corporeal punishment is rather an ineffective thought.. the first thought should be..maybe WE shouldn't bad mouth the over weight and provide the idea that it's ok to treat them inferior in our daily lives, online and in the media.


    Disagree. This is morally equivalent to saying that it isn't the bank robber's fault that he robbed the bank - we as a society have placed so much importance on money, and there is a stigma to being poor (which was the other thing the kids made fun of, by the way). Therefore it's our fault, not his. We need to change how we emphasize money, and then all men will be angels.

    That is clearly ridiculous, at least in part because it misses the point. The problem is that these kids are comfortable harming others in order to obtain what they want, in this case pure entertainment. That is what must be deterred.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:30 PM GMT
    Ariodante saidI wasn't raised in the US, and my 1st thru 12th grade was at a semi-military prep school in Mexico. Any one year I did there was 10x as hard as all my US college years put together. We weren't coddled, we were pushed, and we were constantly told that we were being prepared to take on the world. Some kids got smacked here and there, we were constantly put in brutal competition with each other, public humiliation was our bread and butter. All done to push us to achieve our greatest possible excellence. It's a very different way of teaching and educating. Its' a "suck it up you piece of shit this isn't going to kill you it's going to make you be the best person you can possibly be in this life" methodology that you'll never see in the US lest a thousands lawsuits be filed because the precious children aren't being cradled in silk swaths.


    How did and how do you feel about that method looking back on it now?
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:33 PM GMT
    BlackCat90 said

    How did and how do you feel about that method looking back on it now?


    It was hell. And when I got to college I breezed by with a 4.0 in my sleep because I had been trained to be the best. I am eternally grateful to have been pushed that hard.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:34 PM GMT
    Ariodante said
    BlackCat90 said

    How did and how do you feel about that method looking back on it now?


    It was hell. And when I got to college I breezed by with a 4.0 in my sleep because I had been trained to be the best. I am eternally grateful to have been pushed that hard.


    Hmm I'm not sure if that could ever fully work or work at all here in the states because people are soooo quick to sue about any and everything...I think it would be a disaster.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:37 PM GMT
    I'm in the process of writing a paper about bullying. As much as I DO blame poor parenting, and believe that we need to educate and instill values in kids, I think schools are putting in too much effort building self-esteem...Do anything to make the kids "feel good about themselves." This may work at ages 6-10, but older kids need a good crack on the ass like I got. Now we fear lawsuits even when we gice a kid a funny look. I am probably wrong, but sometimes I feel that the entire prison system went to hell when we replaced the idea of punishment with the idea of rehabilitation.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:38 PM GMT
    BlackCat90 said
    Hmm I'm not sure if that could ever fully work here in the states because people are soooo quick to sue about any and everything here...I think it would be a disaster.


    You'll never see it in the states. And I'm not so sure it's the best approach for everyone. I excelled out of fear, but I saw a lot of kids around me flunk out of that school left and right or just plain suffer through it all. The marching was fun though, I was in one of the competition platoons an we competed with other schools. We also had a National Anthem competition choir, all we did was sing the national anthem and compete with other schools solely on singing the national anthem.
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    Jun 20, 2012 8:38 PM GMT
    Jeeze, kids are awful...