"How are you?" vs "How are you doing?"

  • Musicman91

    Posts: 1529

    Jun 21, 2012 6:31 PM GMT
    I have found when I say "How are you?" to people they generally just give me a geneic answer like good, fine, ok ect. But when I say "How are you doing?" 8 outta 10 times that person usually will actually tell me how they are doing and what is bothering them, how the are really feeling ect. I find it interesting. How about you guys? Is it any different for you when you aks somone one or the other or is it the same?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:01 PM GMT
    tumblr_m3n2tsysQt1r5jm97.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:04 PM GMT
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:06 PM GMT
    I ignore both unless the person is either hot and/or has said something interesting in the forums

    Those messages seem like copypasta btw
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:07 PM GMT
    no-one-ever-asked-how-you-doin-joey-e131



    On topic, that is interesting. I haven't noticed anything different really. Although I usually ask "how are you doing?"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:09 PM GMT
    I don't really think of either question as too different. I suppose some individuals can interpret them differently. However, it's pretty safe to say that both questions are simply a polite acknowledgement that you exist rather than the speaker actually caring how you are. Saying anything beyond "good/fine, thanks, and you?" can easily be interpreted as burdensome. At least that's how it normally works in English.
  • BIG_N_TALL

    Posts: 2190

    Jun 21, 2012 9:13 PM GMT
    Southerners use "how are you doing?" way, way more often than "how are you?" I suspect "how are you?" seems more blunt and formal, and essentially a formality no one truly says with any sense of sincerity. I personally use "how are you doing" all the time though.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:24 PM GMT
    "How do you do?" is the old fashioned corn-pone phrase I was taught as a kid in the early 60's to use. God, it makes me cringe a little bit to this day.
  • BIG_N_TALL

    Posts: 2190

    Jun 21, 2012 9:29 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 said"How do you do?" is the old fashioned corn-pone phrase I was taught as a kid in the early 60's to use. God, it makes me cringe a little bit to this day.



    I use "How do you do?" from time to time as well.... usually for formal occasions that are non-family related.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    To me "how do you do?" sounds more Southern than old fashioned or perhaps a bit of both. Or maybe that expression has survived in the South longer than it has in the rest of the US.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:39 PM GMT
    Joey is the mascot of this thread.
  • BIG_N_TALL

    Posts: 2190

    Jun 21, 2012 9:43 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidTo me "how do you do?" sounds more Southern than old fashioned or perhaps a bit of both. Or maybe that expression has survived in the South longer than it has in the rest of the US.


    I think some of the "How do you do?" survival in the South has to do with social formality, and to say the British influence in the South is trivial would be grossly misrepresented. I think that is why states like Virginia and South Carolina have so many customs --- especially with the 'well-to-do' --- in common with the British 'well-to-do' and aristocracy... at least in the recent past.

    When I met one of my roommates for the first time in college I said, "How do you do?," and he said his first thought about me was "old Southern money." That is just how I talk in general, but I didn't really say it to come across as a snob. Had I say "How y'all doin'?," I probably would have been more endearing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 9:47 PM GMT
    Warhammer said
    pocketnico saidTo me "how do you do?" sounds more Southern than old fashioned or perhaps a bit of both. Or maybe that expression has survived in the South longer than it has in the rest of the US.


    I think some of the "How do you do?" survival in the South has to do with social formality, and to say the British influence in the South is trivial would be grossly misrepresented. I think that is why states like Virginia and South Carolina have so many customs --- especially with the 'well-to-do' --- in common with the British 'well-to-do' and aristocracy... at least in the recent past.

    When I met one of my roommates for the first time in college I said, "How do you do?," and he said his first thought about me was "old Southern money." That is just how I talk in general, but I didn't really say it to come across as a snob. Had I say "How y'all doin'?," I probably would have been more endearing.


    Versus young Northern Virginia money: "Hey, what's up?"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 10:02 PM GMT
    YO! Wassup?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 10:03 PM GMT
    tumblr_lvu14yb6Vv1r3vmvq.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 10:04 PM GMT
    if no wendy williams gifs get posted in this thread you all fail.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 10:05 PM GMT
    BlackCat90 saidtumblr_lvu14yb6Vv1r3vmvq.gif


    same thought same time!

    thank you for saving this thread from making a terrible mistake.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 21, 2012 10:07 PM GMT
    DEKIRUMAN said
    BlackCat90 saidtumblr_lvu14yb6Vv1r3vmvq.gif


    same thought same time!

    thank you for saving this thread from making a terrible mistake.


    lol great minds think alike!
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jun 21, 2012 10:27 PM GMT
    I hate, "Ha-yuh-doin," because what it really means is, "Hi."
    They don't really care how you're doing.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 22, 2012 12:51 AM GMT
    Profile saidno-one-ever-asked-how-you-doin-joey-e131



    On topic, that is interesting. I haven't noticed anything different really. Although I usually ask "how are you doing?"


    Has anyone noticed that Matt LeBlanc is looking more like Tony Danza every day. Kinda scary.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 22, 2012 12:54 AM GMT
    I say "How Jew doing".

    *Warning this could potentially upset those of the Jewish faith.*
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 22, 2012 1:07 AM GMT
    Im guilty of How you doin
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 22, 2012 1:12 AM GMT
    BlackCat90 said
    DEKIRUMAN said
    BlackCat90 saidtumblr_lvu14yb6Vv1r3vmvq.gif


    same thought same time!

    thank you for saving this thread from making a terrible mistake.


    lol great minds think alike!




    RASPUTIA!!!!!!!! Pictures, Images and Photos
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 22, 2012 1:15 AM GMT
    "How you doing" is more something I say to a friend I haven't seen a while or a coworker I run into and expect a little bit of conversation will follow. "How are you" is more something for a person I sometimes see in the hall of the office building but works for a different company or the receptionist at the dentist's office and run into somewhere else and am just saying to be pleasant but am not really going to get into a conversation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 22, 2012 1:21 AM GMT
    I think it's mostly in Britain where it is proper to reply to "How do you do?" with "How do you do?" which seems totally whacked out to me.

    I once almost attacked an English teacher who gave me that reply and in Germany we're told that it is very impolite to reply with another question.