Diet cafeine free soda....

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    Jul 31, 2008 10:39 PM GMT
    I drink tons of it. Does it impact negatively on health/performance etc?
  • NYCguy74

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    Jul 31, 2008 11:21 PM GMT
    i recently saw a study that said artificial sweeteners can actually cause you to eat more and gain weight. The theory is that your body senses the sweet input, and then gets ready to handle the calorie increase. When there are no additional calories, your body then craves more food to try to make up the difference.

    Personally i try to avoid man made chemicals in my food so i don't touch artificial sweeteners. i normally go for water, coffee or milk (soy or skim)

    If water totally bores you, maybe try seltzer with some juice in it, like lime lemon or orange.
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    Jul 31, 2008 11:44 PM GMT
    I think the carbonation is supposed to be 'not good' for your calcium. May diet cafeine free soda be the worst of your self abuse. It's what I drink too.
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    Aug 01, 2008 2:34 AM GMT
    Don't you get headaches? I do. I love Diet Dr. Pepper, but after the studies showing it can cause headaches, migraines, seizures, and brain damage - including tumors. I finally had to cut back. It was my last addiction. I need a new one! Any suggestions?
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    Aug 01, 2008 5:33 AM GMT
    Aspartame gives me headaches. I didn't know that about carbonation though. Because of that myth (still need to verify) I was beginning to wonder whether my seltzer+juice "soda" was still bad for me somehow.
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    Aug 01, 2008 5:39 AM GMT
    Diet soda contains aspartame, which when it's heated turns into the same chemical make up as formaldehyde (what they use to embalm dead bodies) I read that in a study, and also asked my brother-in-law (who's a chemist)... I read this other study that there was a woman found that had a white "film" around her brain.. the matter was tested, and it was 100% aspartame.. Then you have people like my grandmother who has drank diet soda her entire life (shes 90) and she's still kickin!!! So who knows.. I try to stay away from it, but I cave every now and then..
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    Aug 01, 2008 5:42 AM GMT
    So do sodas have phosphates anymore? I used to know a lot of people who wouldn't drink soda because they were afraid of bone loss.

    I'm all about all natural, organic juices my self. Love em. Can't get enough of em.

    And milk.
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    Aug 01, 2008 6:33 AM GMT
    looknrnd saidDon't you get headaches? I do. I love Diet Dr. Pepper, but after the studies showing it can cause headaches, migraines, seizures, and brain damage - including tumors. I finally had to cut back. It was my last addiction. I need a new one! Any suggestions?


    ME...plus a pastrami sandwhich on pumpernickle bread with lots of spicy mustard.
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    Aug 01, 2008 6:35 AM GMT
    I haven't had soda in months. Either water or gatorade for me! icon_biggrin.gif

    I've noticed that I have more energy.. of course this is after the caffeine withdrawals lolz.
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    Aug 01, 2008 6:51 AM GMT
    NYCguy74 saidi recently saw a study that said artificial sweeteners can actually cause you to eat more and gain weight. The theory is that your body senses the sweet input, and then gets ready to handle the calorie increase. When there are no additional calories, your body then craves more food to try to make up the difference.

    Personally i try to avoid man made chemicals in my food so i don't touch artificial sweeteners. i normally go for water, coffee or milk (soy or skim)

    If water totally bores you, maybe try seltzer with some juice in it, like lime lemon or orange.


    Makes sense........I guess that explains why rather than eating something sweet.....I simply drink more artificially sweetened soda.
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    Aug 01, 2008 7:10 AM GMT
    No caffeine, no sugar .. why not just drink water?
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    Aug 01, 2008 7:51 AM GMT
    ActiveAndFit saidNo caffeine, no sugar .. why not just drink water?


    I love water.......but somtimes I crave somthing with more fizzle and taste........you just gave me a great idea......water or selzer water with freshly squeezed lemon.....
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    Aug 01, 2008 3:17 PM GMT
    KissingPro said
    ActiveAndFit saidNo caffeine, no sugar .. why not just drink water?


    I love water.......but somtimes I crave somthing with more fizzle and taste........you just gave me a great idea......water or selzer water with freshly squeezed lemon.....
    Yeah, I get this stuff from traders joes here. Flavored seltzer water with no sweetener. You can add various fruit juices in small amounts if you want it sweet. You can get the orange water and add a little orange juice (maybe half) and you get a natural orange soda. Or the berry flavored water and add pomegranate juice or something. Its kinda like make your own healthy soda. Tastes good too, try it.
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    Aug 01, 2008 7:07 PM GMT
    I had a diet A&W root beer the other day at work. It was awful. What is the point of always denying yourself the joys of life. I am not a big soft drink fan, but if I am going to have one it better have caffeine and taste. Diet sodas are like sex without the orgasm!
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    Aug 27, 2008 9:16 PM GMT
    looknrnd saidDon't you get headaches? I do. I love Diet Dr. Pepper, but after the studies showing it can cause headaches, migraines, seizures, and brain damage - including tumors. I finally had to cut back. It was my last addiction. I need a new one! Any suggestions?


    Eeek! I'm a Diet Dr. Pepper addict. It has been a constant struggle to cut back over the last few months. I've been switching to caffiene free diet sodas the last month and the Dr.P once weekly.

    I was off soda for about 1 1/2 years, had a few friends die, fell off the wagon.icon_smile.gif

    Hoping to start weaning myself off soda by the end of the year.
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    Aug 27, 2008 9:41 PM GMT
    All I need to know is that with Diet Soda/ Soda you can clean off the calcium residue in your toilet, or have you ever tried putting a dirty penny in some soda ? Shiny as new... I can't quit imagine it to be healthy. When I was living in the states it was soda almost all the time, I really missed water. I am in the lucky position to be able to drink the clearest naturally filtered mountain water right off the tap without the side taste of chloride that is so common in many areas where it hast to be mixed in. I believe it is healthier than to drink a chemical mix on a daily basis... The big thing right now here in the coffe shops is just to add washed slices of orange or apple or mint into a pitcher of water you can refill a glass yourself, it is very tasty. I prefer apple juice half/ half water over soda anytime. Every time after a workout I am reminded of why freshwater is called "sweetwater" here. Very few times I have cravings for an ice cold diet coke and I have one, but to drink 2,3 large bottles every day might not be so great..
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    Sep 24, 2008 4:46 AM GMT
    diet AND caffeine free? Why the hell are you drinking it? It sure doesn't taste good.
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    Sep 25, 2008 12:10 AM GMT
    A brand is Canfield's Chocolate soda. I believe it's caffeine free, although I'm not 100% sure.
    Hanson's sodas, I believe, are caffeine free - at least a large list of them! They are natural.
    You could boil a large pot of water and make herbal tea (with several tea bags), which you put into a large pitcher and refrigerate for future drinking. There's no
    caffeine or sugar unless you prefer some sweetener. Or, you could sweeten with honey!
    Just a thought.

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    Sep 25, 2008 1:29 PM GMT
    Here's an excerpt on this topic:

    BIHW: Does caffeine increase risk for osteoporosis?

    Dr. Heaney: A moderate amount of caffeine isn’t harmful to bone health as long as people also consume enough calcium.

    Controlled clinical studies show that although caffeine ingestion results in a small, temporary increase in calcium excretion, it has no effect on 24-hour urinary calcium loss. Studies have also shown that although caffeine can cause the intestine to absorb slightly less calcium when calcium intake is also low, this effect can be fully offset by as little as one to two tablespoons of milk. This helps explain why the epidemiological studies regarding caffeine and bone health are mixed. All the observations in studies linking caffeine intake to osteoporosis were made in populations with calcium intakes far below recommended levels. In studies where dietary calcium intakes were higher, at least 800 milligrams per day, caffeine intake has an almost negligible effect.

    BIHW: Some people believe that sparkling soft drinks, particularly colas, adversely affect bone health. Is this true?

    Dr. Heaney: No. A few observational studies have found an association between high carbonated soft drink consumption and either increased fracture risk or decreased bone mineral density, and the usual explanation given has been that one or more constituents in these beverages, such as caffeine or phosphoric acid, increases urinary calcium losses. But, this theory didn’t hold up under experimental studies done in my lab using carefully controlled calcium-metabolic methods. We found that the net effect of carbonated soft drinks, including colas, on calcium retention was negligible. As a result, it seems likely that colas’ prominence in observational studies is due to their prominence in the marketplace. For example, 27 out of 30 subjects in our study reported being cola drinkers.

    The real issue is that people who drink a lot of soft drinks also tend to have an overall diet that is low in calcium and other important nutrients bones need. And, it’s the poor diet and low calcium intake impacting skeletal fragility that need to be addressed – not whether or not they drink soft drinks per se.

    BIHW: Could you explain your study on the impact of carbonated soft drinks on calcium in more detail?

    Dr. Heaney: In 2001, we published a calcium metabolic study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that compared the impact of four different soft drinks, plus water and milk, on urinary calcium in adult women who normally consume soft drinks. Because that study evaluated a caffeine-free and a regular cola, both of which contained phosphoric acid, and a caffeine-free and a caffeinated citrus-flavored soft drink, neither of which contained phosphoric acid, we were able to evaluate the impact of soft drinks overall, as well as the individual and combined impact of these ingredients, on calcium balance. Our results showed that the effect of soft drinks on calcium losses, including those with caffeine and colas with phosphoric acid, is negligible.

    Specifically, we found that phosphoric acid had no impact at all: The caffeine-free cola did not increase urinary calcium losses. In addition, although both the caffeinated cola and caffeinated citrus soft drink caused a small increase in urinary calcium loss, it was about equal to that previously found for caffeine alone.

    However, since the body can compensate for the small impact of caffeine by reducing calcium losses later in the day, we determined that soft drinks, including colas with phosphoric acid and those with caffeine, have essentially no impact on calcium balance.

    BIHW: Why do concerns over phosphoric acid in colas seem to linger? Is there something unique about phosphoric acid or phosphorus that negatively affects bone health?

    Dr. Heaney: No. The common myth that the phosphoric acid in colas draws calcium out of the bones is likely linked to a theory that an acidic diet causes minerals to be drawn from the bones to neutralize the impact of the acid on blood pH. But, as I explained earlier, our calcium-metabolic study found that the phosphoric acid in cola had no net impact on urinary calcium losses. Now, I must admit that this finding was initially unexpected, but perhaps it should not have been, considering the body normally produces 50 to 100 mEq of acid a day during the metabolism of food. The acid load imposed by a 20-ounce cola is only about 4.5 to 5.0 mEq, or substantially less than the amount produced by eating even a moderate protein breakfast.

    There is also no plausible evidence that phosphorus in the diet is harmful to bone health in humans. This theory began with studies showing a harmful effect in animals and the findings were extrapolated to humans. But the animal diets contained amounts of phosphorus up to five times the amount in a typical human diet, so the findings aren’t applicable to humans. And, although phosphorus is widely believed to form insoluble complexes with calcium and is often listed as a potential anti-absorber on web sites, studies conducted more than 25 years ago in my lab and others showed that varying phosphorus intakes have little or no effect on overall calcium balance.


    Phosphorus is actually quite plentiful in the food supply. For example, depending on the brand, 8 ounces of cola contains 25-40 milligrams of phosphorus, in the form of phosphoric acid, which is used as the acidulant. The same amount of orange juice has 27 mg of phosphorus and milk has 232 milligrams in 8 ounces. To put these amounts into perspective, national dietary surveys in the U.S. show that the highest level of phosphorus intake among individuals who don’t take supplements is about 2500 mg per day, which is well within the safe limits established by the Institute of Medicine. The safe limits for phosphorus established by the Institute of Medicine are 4,000 mg (4 g) per day for individuals between the ages of 9 and 70 and 3,000 mg (3 g) per day for those over 70 and between the ages of 1 and 8.

    Phosphorus Content of Common Foods and Beverages
    Cola (8 oz): 25 - 40 mg
    Orange Juice (8 oz), unfortified: 27 mg
    Peanuts (1 oz), shelled: 113 mg
    Chicken breast, roasted: 124 mg
    Cheddar cheese (1 oz): 145 mg
    Milk (8 oz), 1%: 232 mg

    BIHW: Does the carbonation in soft drinks harm bones?

    Dr. Heaney: No. In fact, research has shown that carbonated waters rich in calcium and other minerals can actually improve measures of skeletal metabolism in postmenopausal women with low calcium intakes. And, as for carbonation in soft drinks, our calcium-metabolic soft drink study also exonerated carbonation when we determined that caffeine-free soft drinks had no net effect on urinary calcium loss. This isn’t surprising since the amount of carbon dioxide absorbed from a soft drink is relatively very small compared to the amount our cells continuously produce as a byproduct of energy production.

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    Sep 25, 2008 1:53 PM GMT
    XRuggerATX saidAspartame gives me headaches.


    Aspartame is the most common sweetener in carbonated diet beverages, and why I won't drink them. I have epilepsy, and have noticed a weak relationship between my consumption of aspartame products and seizure episodes.

    This remains a controversial subject, with studies, and strong advocates, supporting both the pro and anti-aspartame camps. Headaches, seizures and other neurological problems have been charged to aspartame use. But my own personal experience is anecdotal and not scientific.

    Nevertheless, as a seizure can be a dangerous & unpleasant thing I prefer not to take any chances, and avoid the stuff in the blue packets totally.
  • JohnG16775

    Posts: 235

    Sep 26, 2008 1:47 AM GMT
    What do you guys think about G2, I used to drink Coke the real full strength,. went off of them cold turkey, now I but G2 is my new replacement, I know I should drink more water. What do you guys think about G2
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    Sep 30, 2008 4:04 PM GMT
    KissingPro saidI drink tons of it. Does it impact negatively on health/performance etc?


    This is really a question?
    You should give it up and try tons of smoking, then the weight will really start dropping off! icon_eek.gif
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    Sep 30, 2008 4:10 PM GMT
    28516079_34d678dc15.jpg?v=0
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    Oct 03, 2008 2:08 AM GMT
    Hmm...I have found a carbonated flavoured water. Potassium free, sodium 15mg/serving.

    I could handle this to wean off the diet sodas.

    Do I get approval?icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 03, 2008 2:11 AM GMT
    XRuggerATX said28516079_34d678dc15.jpg?v=0


    Yes, drinking your own urine specimen on a dare is not a good idea.

    Actually, funny sequence, well done.