how much time do you spend in nature?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 4:22 PM GMT
    Hey, I'm curious how much time people on here spend alone in nature?

    I mean in the woods or a field, or a river, by themselves, not a BBQ with their friends or family, etc.


    Has it been awhile, do you do it regularly and where is your favorite spot, give the Google map location if you got.


    I think America's green spots are fading and people are no longer getting to them so much, especially my generation and onward. icon_idea.gif

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    Aug 01, 2008 5:02 PM GMT
    Surrounded by it and cant get enough and hate big cities!
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Aug 01, 2008 5:37 PM GMT
    Does hiking with friends count? Does camping with friends count? Who wants to go on a really long hike and spend the night in the woods by himself?

    I spend very little time alone in nature. But I spend a fair about of time outdoors "in nature" with my friends; hiking, swimming in lakes, campfires, stargazing....
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    Aug 01, 2008 5:40 PM GMT
    thankfully my job as a landscape architect gives me all the outdoor time i could possibly wish for. even better, my current project is in malibu at the beach. so, it really NEVER sucks for me to go to work. i get out and walk the malibu creek almost daily and then have lunch on the beach.

    the lack of green space in the country is EXACTLY why i got in to this profession!
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    Aug 01, 2008 6:04 PM GMT
    Well, "nature" is everything that's actually real. But I do spend most all of my time in the boonies. I started a project to clear a small trail through the woods for my before-breakfast run. I think it will be a nice way to start the day. There's one spot with a small clearing on a ridge that has expansive views. I'm thinking of putting a small platform there for stretching and maybe some form of yoga.

    The official "wilderness areas" are hardly worth going to any more. When I was a kid, you could hike all day without seeing another person. Now, there are so many people that you can can't even find a camp site. I really think that it's time for some sort of access restrictions - maximum daily admissions and some sort of lottery system.
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    Aug 01, 2008 6:16 PM GMT
    From elementary to the first 2 years of high school, I used to go hiking alone a lot. I'd take a net, a jar, a backpack, some food, and sometimes my fishing pole.

    I'd hike through creeks usually, catching fish mostly and anything interesting that I can add to my private pond/aquarium in our house. (Usually freshwater prawns. LOL)

    At times, I'd take a chisel, a hammer, lots of plastic bags, and my backpack and I'd scour the limestone deposits in the area looking for fossils. I still have my collection from those days. icon_smile.gif

    There are two protected wilderness areas nearby us (due to the fact that we live right next to a University Town) and more in the surrounding mountains of our valley.

    Sadly... It's considered totally dorky for an adult to go hiking alone here in the Philippines where people would rather have you working hard to feed someone (we're third world, hobbies like that are looked down upon). icon_sad.gif So I've given up hiking alone since, but sometimes me and my friends get together to climb a local hill and sanctuary.
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    Aug 01, 2008 6:36 PM GMT
    If I need some serious alone time, there's a rock that resides just above Castro where you can see the entire East Bay from North to South. Awesome view!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 6:46 PM GMT
    Not much, but I spend a fair amount of time answering the call of nature! icon_redface.gif
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Aug 01, 2008 7:09 PM GMT
    ALOT... I like it A LOT!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 7:11 PM GMT
    Country air's not for me, I wont breathe nothin' I cant see...

    cat
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:28 PM GMT
    sadly, i dont get to do it very often.

    however, i did go running yesterday in the forest reserve area behind the development. kicked my ass, but it was nice to run in quiet wilderness, chirping birds and the river. oh, and encountered a bunch of rabbits as i ran along.

    i remember gettin within 10 feet of 2 mule deer, and took lots of photos of them! it was cool that they didn't run off, they just kept feeding as i kept snapping pictures. it was the best 1.5 hours i spent in nature.
  • irishboxers

    Posts: 357

    Aug 01, 2008 8:38 PM GMT
    Every weekend for at least 4-5 hours. It's called playing golf. icon_biggrin.gif

    Didn't George Carlin do a sketch years ago about how if you put all the golf courses in the country together, they would make an area the size of Rhode Island? That's a good amount of green space and nature if you ask me.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:52 PM GMT
    Golf doesnt COUNT!! You need to not have anything going on and just focus on the beautiful surroundings, almost go into a meditative state.

    I like to go on hikes, run's through trails. And every year I visit Yosemite National Park<33

    One of my favorite places.

    Im a big nature kid!
  • qalbi30

    Posts: 116

    Aug 01, 2008 9:10 PM GMT
    As much time as possible,like most introverts I need to get away from people to 're charge the batteries'
    Sometimes one can better value friends and understand situations from a distance.
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    Aug 01, 2008 9:11 PM GMT
    Not a big fan of nature here. I need a city. Currently I live in a semi rural semi suburban area. While I like the space I have and the house itself, I miss living in the city tremendously. I need the electricity of crowds and the noise and the public transportation and the food and the culture and the etc. In the city there were cockroaches but they never bit. Out here there's all manner of flying insects that bite bite bite. Out here there's septic tanks. I didn't know what a septic tank was until I moved here. When I lived in the city, I thought when you flushed the toilet, the contents just disappeared. Now, I'm living next to a big box of shit in the ground. Far more power outages out here too. At least in the city when the power went out, I could go looting.
  • irishboxers

    Posts: 357

    Aug 01, 2008 10:05 PM GMT
    Hoodiestud saidGolf doesnt COUNT!! You need to not have anything going on and just focus on the beautiful surroundings, almost go into a meditative state.

    I like to go on hikes, run's through trails. And every year I visit Yosemite National Park<33

    One of my favorite places.

    Im a big nature kid!


    Everyone meditates and unwinds in different ways. I do it with a little ball and a 7 iron. For you, it's hiking and runs. Whatever makes each of us happy. No need to get bitchy when someone has a different definition.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 10:11 PM GMT
    Not as much as I'd like however I LOVE it there! Went last weekend for a few days and going on a half day hike tomorrow!!!
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    Aug 01, 2008 10:19 PM GMT
    Nature? Does the levee on the Mississippi count? I love to read and relax there all by myself (until the lovely oil spill occurred this past week). Not exactly nature, but alone, near the water, with greenery.
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    Aug 01, 2008 10:23 PM GMT
    When I lived in Northwestern Canada, I went on hikes all the time by myself, now in Moscow, not so much, haha. The last time I was by myself in nature would probably be when I went kayaking and left everyone behind, while in Miami. I miss it so much. I find that I really feel at peace when I'm alone in nature. Can't wait until I'm back somewhere I can experience that feeling!
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    Aug 01, 2008 10:34 PM GMT
    I'm with McGay. We have a mountain place in NC and my partner would be happy to spend all of his time there, staring at the poison ivy and dancing around the fire when he burns the trash. I want bookstores, coffee shops, good restaurants and theater. Asheville (where southernguy lives) would have been ideal, but it's too far from Atlanta for convenient commuting.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 10:39 PM GMT
    Three out seven days of the week. I love going to parks and remoted wilderness areas by myself and just absorb my surroundings. Hiking up mountains allowing myself to 'get lost' in some unknown wilderness area thrills me and brings me to life. I'm going to be moving to Arizona and can't wait to visit Sedona and someday the Grand Canyon.
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    Aug 01, 2008 10:51 PM GMT
    I am not into heat, humidity, and bugs. In Virginia, that pretty much keeps one indoors. Like anyone, I like to get outside on a nice day. But I am definitely not a nature nut.
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    Aug 01, 2008 11:09 PM GMT


    Modified from Doreen Virtue's "talk with angels",


    >>Spend time alone in nature. "Sounds and smells of nature are invisible, so they take your mind to the invisible realm of spirit, where things vibrate higher and faster than matter. There are healing properties in nature....

    Being in nature helps you to adapt to the natural rhythm of the earth, and since timing and cycles are a part of everything, you become more in sync with the rhythm of life.

    <<

    from personal experience, I've noticed that spending time in nature alone has calmed me down, has sharpened my mind, no longer worry about all the small things, have become more confident and lastly, I feel more innocent, knowing that I am still part of earth.

    It's funny how from early on we see nature as an enemy to a good life: we build forts, cut trees, spray pesticides, DDT (or whatever the alternatives today are) the mosquitoes, etc....



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 02, 2008 12:46 AM GMT
    I grew up surrounded by farms and untouched wilderness, on my own. So I can officially say that I've had my fill with nature.

    Give me a good grey polluted city anyday.
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    Aug 02, 2008 2:14 AM GMT


    We're out in White Rock now. Burnaby, where we lived before, is a place of sooted buildings and town planning, where houses and large yards with heavy plantings are being replaced with townhouse complexes and condo towers. We've been here since July 12th and my breathing has tremendously changed. I'm not sure what we were breathing before.

    So now, being out in nature is as simple as going outside. We have a hawk in the backyard and bats at night. The odd bald eagle floats overhead occasionally. Granted, we're considered 'in the city', but only a few blocks from open land and farms.

    Both of us love outdoors, and have spent time kayaking in the gulf islands. Alone with each other. Not much talking, just a lot of existing.

    We both find it's like recharging batteries and I feel a connectedness that stays with me for a few days.

    -Doug