Do you consider Obama black or white?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 7:21 PM GMT
    Regardless of your personal beliefs, the reality is that the man is no more black than he is white. His genetic makeup is no more sub-Saharan African than it is western European. Yet, despite this fact, many continue to refer to Obama as an "African-American", despite the fact that this is only marginally true.

    Why disregard the man's European ancestry? It's true, he may have dark skin and kinky hair, but the man is not an "African-American" in the true sense of the word.

    As a member of the same ethnic makeup as Obama, I find it interesting that the mainstream media has designated Obama as a black man and nothing else. To me, it's concordent with the "one drop rule" of the past and other forms of ethnocentrism and ignorance in an attempt to maintain racial heirarchy.

    Why don't people of mixed racial ancestry have a say in the matter? If Obama called himself white he'd be no more wrong than if he called himself black, because the truth of the matter is that he's neither. Yet, if he did this, I bet people would be willing to object, yet don't object to him being called black.

    So the reality here is that Obama won't be the first black President, he'll be the first mixed race President. I don't understand why that concept is so hard for some to grasp....
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    Aug 01, 2008 7:44 PM GMT
    A human male with a caucasian mother and a african father. Being Canadian this sort of conversation does not happen as much.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:00 PM GMT

    I think this subject is stretching itself beyond belief. You said yourself the man is both and since Black America is experiencing a great shortage of good black role models, I beg you, "Can we please have him?"
    PLEASE!

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    Aug 01, 2008 8:03 PM GMT
    GuiltyGear said
    I think this subject is stretching itself beyond belief. You said yourself the man is both and since Black America is experiencing a great shortage of good black role models, I beg you, "Can we please have him?"
    PLEASE!



    Well I can't see him doing as bad a job as the incumbent. It would be a refreshing change if the US elected someone that was not WASP (and this is coming from a WASP). Not because there is anything wrong with being WASP, but the USA like many other countries is very diverse. It is not healthy in a democracy for one particular group to feel they are entitled to be the power brokers.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:05 PM GMT
    Honestly I don't really give it much of a thought. I guess if pressed I'd say I consider him bi racial.

    Do you think that someone like Jesse Jackson would let him get away with making his european ancestry more pronounced? I tend to believe that the media is trying there best to be as P.C. knowing this particular topic in America is a damned if you do damned if you don't type of situation.

    Someone will get offended along the way. Instead of focusing on the mans workability where ethnicity shouldn't be a factor it becomes a deterrent. Instead of trying hard to unite this messed up nation it could become a catalyst to divide.

    Hopefully the greater masses don't see color or ethnicity. Hopefully they look much deeper and reach for what really counts.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:08 PM GMT
    I consider him a man. Thread over!
  • TallGWMvballe...

    Posts: 1925

    Aug 01, 2008 8:10 PM GMT
    Very interesting.

    Ethnically, racially he IS a 50/50 blend... perhaps and hopefully he is the best of both and can be a strong force to bring the waring parties together,
    Black and White in America have a long and mostly bad history.
    I certainly hope, wish and support that Obama will be a NEW breed in every sense of that word; a new Powerful force which we have never seen before.

    Perhaps he is "The One" to help us all work towards seeing we are on this ride together and we need eachother.


    Black, White, or someone else is way less important than what he brings to the table; something new, something fresh, intelligent and honest.

    Let him be a great role model for people of ALL races!
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:13 PM GMT
    You could probably put Barak in the same catergory as Tiger Woods

    EDIT: before anyone takes this the wrong way, I am refering to the term "multi-racial"
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:18 PM GMT
    spryte21 saidYou could probably put Barak in the same catergory as Tiger Woods

    EDIT: before anyone takes this the wrong way, I am refering to the term "multi-racial"



    PHEW! i thought you were trying to label him a successful, multi-millionaire athlete.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:21 PM GMT
    Are you serious! WTF is up with these forums!
  • joggerva

    Posts: 731

    Aug 01, 2008 8:25 PM GMT
    neverfollow86 saidmany continue to refer to Obama as an "African-American", despite the fact that this is only marginally true.

    Why disregard the man's European ancestry? It's true, he may have dark skin and kinky hair, but the man is not an "African-American" in the true sense of the word.


    His father is African, and his mother is American; I'd say he has a pretty good claim to the term African-American if he wanted.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:25 PM GMT
    I think if a man or women is bi racial, they should not have to pick a race and say that is what they are. I think bi racial people are really beautiful. I just think it is sad when they are expected to identify with one race. I’m Irish and English but I am not expected to choose to be one or the other. I just don't get it. Why can't he just say he is bi racial and leave it at that?
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Aug 01, 2008 8:42 PM GMT
    This is part of what Barack had to say when confronted about not being on top of Black Issues recently:

    "That doesn't mean I am always going to satisfy the way you want these issues framed... which gives you the option of voting for somebody else, it gives you the option of running for office yourself, those are all options. But the one thing I think is important is, that we are respectful towards each other. And what is true is that the only way we are going to solve our problems in this country is if all of us come together, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, young, old, disabled, gay, straight... that has got to be our agenda."

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/08/01/obama-heckled-for-not-foc_n_116308.html

    Race is an issue, but it's not the main one. We can't hide from it, as in the past, and we'd be dumb to think that someone isn't going to bring it up again and again. It's not the main issue, though.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:50 PM GMT
    neverfollow86 saidRegardless of your personal beliefs, the reality is that the man is no more black than he is white. His genetic makeup is no more sub-Saharan African than it is western European. Yet, despite this fact, many continue to refer to Obama as an "African-American", despite the fact that this is only marginally true.


    Claiming that any reference to Obama as African American is "marginally true" is patently illogical, for as you've stated Obama is half-black and half-white. For the sake of discourse, let's be fair and accurate icon_smile.gif.


    neverfollow86 saidWhy disregard the man's European ancestry? It's true, he may have dark skin and kinky hair, but the man is not an "African-American" in the true sense of the word.


    Although I recognize the need for one to acknowledge one's ancestral origins completely, I find it both naive and, to an extent, impractical to dismiss readily the notion that Obama might be African American. After all, the one-drop rule is still a part of our current zeitgeist. And if I recall correctly, Obama himself identifies as African American.


    neverfollow86 saidAs a member of the same ethnic makeup as Obama, I find it interesting that the mainstream media has designated Obama as a black man and nothing else. To me, it's concordent with the "one drop rule" of the past and other forms of ethnocentrism and ignorance in an attempt to maintain racial heirarchy.

    Might it be more accurate to describe yourself as a member of the same genetic makeup--not ethnic makeup--as Obama? The word "ethnic" connotes customs and social views, and Obama's customs and social views largely mirror those of an African American, not a biracial individual with no ethnic-specific loyalties. As regards the "one-drop" rule, I recognize its merits and demerits, but would rather not debate them in this thread--not now, anyway.

    neverfollow86 saidWhy don't people of mixed racial ancestry have a say in the matter? If Obama called himself white he'd be no more wrong than if he called himself black, because the truth of the matter is that he's neither. Yet, if he did this, I bet people would be willing to object, yet don't object to him being called black.

    To an extent, people of mixed racial ancestry do have a say in the matter. Consider Tiger Woods, who identifies himself as Caublasian. The media accepts it; I have no issue with it. Yet in the political arena things are different: politicians cannot transcend race as easily as athletes can. Race and politics are generally concomitant, which makes it more difficult for mixed-race individuals to publicly present themselves as having no ethnic-specific loyalties. In fact, mixed-race individuals with high political aspirations must navigate the political arena with the skills of a master trapeze artist. How well as Obama performed? This remains to be seen.

    neverfollow86 saidSo the reality here is that Obama won't be the first black President, he'll be the first mixed race President. I don't understand why that concept is so hard for some to grasp....

    This is one way to look at it. It is legitimate. For me, however, I see Obama, the son of an African man and a Caucasian woman, as an African American solely because of his choice to identify as such, though I suspect that his mixed-race background has been a boon thus far. Nevertheless, I'm unsure that he'll become our next President.
  • bmwneeded

    Posts: 3

    Aug 01, 2008 8:50 PM GMT
    The reason why he is referred to as the black candidate goes back to the 1 drop rule. That is: ONLY one drop of African blood within your DNA makeup is enough for one to be considered black and be subject to the Jim Crow Laws that existed at the time.

    Today it is PC to say biracial however, when people are press to pick one race or another, most people tend to say what they usually see - black.

    Now, I am not to saying that all people today will say and or choose one race verses the other; I am saying people see a black man before them and so a black he will be. No one would automatically think that his mother was white if they did not know his family background.

    Those who can true see pass black and or white are those who have had more exposure to persons who are biracial and/or the way one may have been raised with diverse leaning parents.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 8:52 PM GMT
    I consider him one thing; cunning. I think he is next step in the evolutionary path he shares with the Clintons.

    This election is interesting, liberals eat up the latest packaging of a sleazy politician and conservatives see their candidate as a difference slice of the same cake. It would be funny if it weren't so important.

  • Aug 01, 2008 9:00 PM GMT
    one drop rule. isn't it great?
    america has some obsession with
    labeling people.
    i forgot what the case court case
    was but does anyone know of the kid
    in louisianna that was 1/256th black?
    the child was blonde hair, blue eyed
    and the case had to be taken to court
    because of the American's obsession with
    labeling. RIDICULOUS!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 9:02 PM GMT
    If he was in uptown Manhattan after midnight trying to get a cab (and he was unknown), he'd be black. I'm sure the guy has experienced anti-black discrimination. He certainly is now.

  • Aug 01, 2008 9:04 PM GMT
    but i do get a bit peeved when the media
    and general public refer to him as black.
    the first black candidate..the first black president.
    makes me want to open palm slap my forehead.
    there making such a big deal out of it people seem distracted by his different look rather be interested
    in what he can potentially do for America.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 9:06 PM GMT
    Whatever he is, I wish he was more handsome. I think it'd more easily garner him the shallow vote and the shallow vote makes up at least 80% of the voting American public.
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Aug 01, 2008 9:12 PM GMT
    McGay saidWhatever he is, I wish he was more handsome. I think it'd more easily garner him the shallow vote and the shallow vote makes up at least 80% of the voting American public.


    We should be allowed to text our votes like on American Idol.
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    Aug 01, 2008 9:13 PM GMT
    Then in that case, we should get Simon, Paula and Randy to judge the candidates on live TV. Screw the debates.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2008 9:14 PM GMT
    Obama himself refers to himself as African American and that is the only thing that matters.


    Actucally he is more African American than those of us who have been born state side because of his African Hertiage.

    He's proud of both.

    In this country if you have 1% of African American, Latino, Asian...are a consider that race.

    If you go back and read about the colonial period during the slave trade in this country it is explained rather clearly.

    I was born Cuban and African American but I look more African American than I do Cuban but I am proud of both.


    Race will always be an issue in this country and those think diffreny is not living in the real world.

    If Obama is elected the racial tensions in this country who magically go way were talking over 300 years of it's not going to go way over night.
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    Aug 01, 2008 9:14 PM GMT
    RunintheCity saidBecause his race is being defined BY OTHERS, he is LABELED as black.

    The only and real answer to this question is the answer Mr. Obama himself provides to whomever asks.



    RUNintheCITY has it right. We must answer/define ourselves. Mr. Obama is no different. ASK HIM! Don't ask us.

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    Aug 01, 2008 9:21 PM GMT
    It'd be cool if Cher were to become first lady or veep.

    Half Breed - Cher


    My father married a pure Cherokee
    My mother's people were ashamed of me
    The indians said I was white by law
    The White Man always called me "Indian Squaw"

    CHORUS:
    Half-breed, that's all I ever heard
    Half-breed, how I learned to hate the word
    Half-breed, she's no good they warned
    Both sides were against me since the day I was born

    We never settled, went from town to town
    When you're not welcome you don't hang around
    The other children always laughed at me
    "Give her a feather, she's a Cherokee"

    Repeat Chorus

    We weren't accepted and I felt ashamed
    Nineteen I left them, tell me who's to blame
    My life since then has been from man to man
    But it can't run away from what I am

    Repeat chorus