The AMA (American Medical Association), the largest association of physicians in America, cheers the healthcare reform being upheld by the Supreme Court

  • nanidesukedo

    Posts: 1036

    Jun 30, 2012 1:03 AM GMT
    http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/357490/20120628/ama-supreme-court.htm


    The AMA praised the decision, saying it will spur innovation, simplify administration and expand coverage.

    "This decision protects important improvements, such as ending coverage denials due to pre-existing conditions and lifetime caps on insurance, and allowing the 2.5 million young adults up to age 26 who gained coverage under the law to stay on their parents' health insurance policies," the AMA said in a statement.

    "The expanded health care coverage upheld by the Supreme Court will allow patients to see their doctors earlier rather than waiting for treatment until they are sicker and care is more expensive. The decision upholds funding for important research on the effectiveness of drugs and treatments and protects expanded coverage for prevention and wellness care, which has already benefited about 54 million Americans.

    "The health reform law upheld by the Supreme Court simplifies administrative burdens, including streamlining insurance claims, so physicians and their staff can spend more time with patients and less time on paperwork. It protects those in the Medicare 'donut hole,' including the 5.1 million Medicare patients who saved significantly on prescription drugs in 2010 and 2011. These important changes have been made while maintaining our American system with both private and public insurers."
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    Jun 30, 2012 1:08 AM GMT
    From a Liberal site:
    http://thinkprogress.org/health/2011/09/07/313211/77-percent-of-doctors-say-ama-does-not-represent-their-views/

    Seventy-seven percent of physicians “say the American Medical Association does not represent their views, according to a new volunteer-based online survey by the physician staffing firm Jackson & Coker. Just 11 percent said AMA’s stance and actions reflects their beliefs.” The doctors also rated AMA as ineffective in lobbying for their priorities, including tort reform (72 percent called AMA ineffective), physician practice autonomy (69 percent), physician reimbursement (68 percent), protections from insurance company abuses (75 percent), and “intrusive government regulations” (78 percent).

    The AMA took a big hit after it failed to secure a deal to stave off reimbursement cuts (changing the so-called SGR formula) as part of the Affordable Care Act and that did nothing to stop the slow bleed of doctors turning their backs on the organization. While it theoretically represents all physicians, the AMA’s paying membership comprises somewhere between 15 to 18 percent of doctors. Consequently, member dues accounted for a relatively small percentage of AMA revenue. The rest of its funds come from things like billing codes, CMS payment negotiations, and other non-membership-related operations.
  • nanidesukedo

    Posts: 1036

    Jun 30, 2012 1:16 AM GMT
    Seems medical students agree as well..

    And not only do they agree with the Affordable Care Act, they don't think it goes far enough:

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0023557

    Change is coming...and as the old ones die out...
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    Jun 30, 2012 1:22 AM GMT
    Of course, some organizations that see their members' reimbursement cut (continuing with current trends in Medicare) aren't happy, such as the orthopedics docs and urologists. But by and large, most medical organizations agree with the ACA.
    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/medical-organizations-respond-aca-ruling/story?id=16673570#.T-5TD_URZ8EMost major national medical organizations -- including the American Medical Association, the National Physicians Alliance, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Association of American Medical Colleges -- hail the ruling as a victory. Many of these organizations have been strong supporters of the ACA since Congress passed it in 2010.


    The American College of Physicians (the 2nd largest physician group in the US ) has mostly positive things to say about the decision, but this is particularly relevant:
    https://www.acponline.org/pressroom/supreme_court_upholds_aca.htm?hp
    ACP recognizes that even with the Supreme Court’s ruling, the political debate over the ACA continues and that its future is a major issue in the 2012 election. We hope that a day will come when the debate will no longer be polarized between repeal on one hand, or keeping the law exactly as it is on the other, but on preserving all of the good things that it does while making needed improvements. For instance, ACP continues to believe that there is an urgent need for more meaningful reforms to the medical liability system. Yet, in the meantime, we will continue to urge Congress not to take any actions, including funding restrictions, to impede successful implementation of the ACA and the enormous benefits to patients, even as we will continue to seek opportunities for bipartisan improvements.


    I find their info on the ACA very informative, and it goes into nuts and bolts of the law for internists.

    https://www.acponline.org/advocacy/where_we_stand/access/internists_guide/
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    Jun 30, 2012 1:23 AM GMT
    nanidesukedo saidSeems medical students agree as well..

    And not only do they agree with the Affordable Care Act, they don't think it goes far enough:

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0023557

    Change is coming...and as the old ones die out...

    Survey was not old dinosaurs but mid-career. I hardly think medical students are aware of the economic and business impacts and are any more qualified than a lay person. I don't think doctors in hospital practice see even a fraction of the business and economic issues faced by doctors in private practice, but that is just a supposition of mine. If hospital based doctors have a significantly different view of ObamaCare, that would suggest they are, in fact, insulated from many of the issues faced by doctors in private practice.

    In any event, I think doctors in private practice will have the greatest impact on voters if my assumption that the great majority of likely voters have as their primary physician, one in private practice. Even if that assumption is not correct, impacted by HMOs, I still think private doctors will be extremely influential in driving voter positions.
  • nanidesukedo

    Posts: 1036

    Jun 30, 2012 1:25 AM GMT
    socalfitness said
    nanidesukedo saidSeems medical students agree as well..

    And not only do they agree with the Affordable Care Act, they don't think it goes far enough:

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0023557

    Change is coming...and as the old ones die out...

    Survey was not old dinosaurs but mid-career. I hardly think medical students are aware of the economic and business impacts and are any more qualified than a lay person. I don't think doctors in hospital practice see even a fraction of the business and economic issues faced by doctors in private practice, but that is just a supposition of mine. If hospital based doctors have a significantly different view of ObamaCare, that would suggest they are, in fact, insulated from many of the issues faced by doctors in private practice.

    In any event, I think doctors in private practice will have the greatest impact on voters if my assumption that the great majority of likely voters have as their primary physician, one in private practice. Even if that assumption is not correct, impacted by HMOs, I still think private doctors will be extremely influential in driving voter positions.


    Your assumption that the majority of people receive their primary care from a private practice used to be correct, but is wrong now...Since 2000, the amount of private practices has declined by 20-30% and is expected to continue that trend..
    Hospital practices allows for the subsidization of costs and for better care of patients..
    Small and individual practices are a dying breed. Hospitals and large group practices (often associated with hospitals) are the current trend.

    Ya wanna know why private practices will have Zero influence on this argument?
    Here's a hint...think about the patients that go to private care practices.. Already have good insurance if you are seeing a private practice or small group doctor ;)

    You aren't uninsured or underinsured if you are seeing someone outside of a hospital practice

    But, also stating again...many small group and private, individual practitioners who act as PCP are for the healthcare law change (Internal medicine and family medicine tend to attract those sorts of people).

    As Q mentioned above, it's the private and small group practices of cardiologists, gastroenterologists, dermatologists, urologists, orthopedics, etc...who get charge happy with procedures who are not happy.
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    Jun 30, 2012 1:29 AM GMT
    nanidesukedo said
    socalfitness said
    nanidesukedo saidSeems medical students agree as well..

    And not only do they agree with the Affordable Care Act, they don't think it goes far enough:

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0023557

    Change is coming...and as the old ones die out...

    Survey was not old dinosaurs but mid-career. I hardly think medical students are aware of the economic and business impacts and are any more qualified than a lay person. I don't think doctors in hospital practice see even a fraction of the business and economic issues faced by doctors in private practice, but that is just a supposition of mine. If hospital based doctors have a significantly different view of ObamaCare, that would suggest they are, in fact, insulated from many of the issues faced by doctors in private practice.

    In any event, I think doctors in private practice will have the greatest impact on voters if my assumption that the great majority of likely voters have as their primary physician, one in private practice. Even if that assumption is not correct, impacted by HMOs, I still think private doctors will be extremely influential in driving voter positions.


    Your assumption that the majority of people receive their primary care from a private practice used to be correct, but is wrong now...Since 2000, the amount of private practices has declined by 20-30% and is expected to continue that trend..
    Hospital practices allows for the subsidization of costs and for better care of patients..
    Small and individual practices are a dying breed.

    Ya wanna know why private practices will have Zero influence on this argument?
    Here's a hint...think about the patients that go to private care practices.. Already have good insurance if you are seeing a private practice or small group doctor ;)

    You aren't uninsured or underinsured if you are seeing someone outside of a hospital practice

    Private practice patients, and in turn, their doctors, have significant influence on this because they are concerned about losing their insurance, losing the ability to see their preferred doctor, having to pay more, having to wait longer for primary and specialist services. In general, getting lower quality of care, paying more for the care, and paying more in taxes. Pretty major.

    My guess is that the percentage of registered voters seeing private doctors is higher than the general population pool of patients, and that of likely voters is still higher. Whatever the percentage is, I think private doctors will exert a significant influence on the opinion of voters.
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    Jun 30, 2012 1:58 AM GMT
    nanidesukedo saidSeems medical students agree as well..

    And not only do they agree with the Affordable Care Act, they don't think it goes far enough:

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0023557

    Change is coming...and as the old ones die out...




    You got this right !!! Some 'older' people cannot accept change because they fear it, its time such old geezers get out of the way and make way for our very inteligent younger people to take the reigns of government and move us forward. Younger leaders can end the status quo that the old geezers are so used to and that has made them rich. MOVE THEM ASIDE !!!