creatine

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    Aug 02, 2008 1:22 PM GMT
    Will taking creatine before my work out help with energy?
    I find that I poop out halfway through my workouts. If so what kind do you recommend and how soon before my work out should I take it? Thanks!
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    Aug 02, 2008 4:24 PM GMT
    Thanks Much More!
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    Aug 02, 2008 4:40 PM GMT
    I love creatine, works great for me. It's also dirt cheap.

    Just be sure you pick up pure creatine monohydrate and not one of the packages cut with a ton of sugar, or you'll pack on some weight.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Aug 04, 2008 10:51 AM GMT
    There's a lot of controversy on the creatine question
    supposedly it helps in ATP production
    ATP is the mainstay our bodies use to produce energy
    even if it does
    I think the potential for kidney damage outweighs its use
    Drink LOTS of water when you use the stuff...
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    Aug 04, 2008 10:48 PM GMT
    GeorgeE saidWill taking creatine before my work out help with energy?
    I find that I poop out halfway through my workouts. If so what kind do you recommend and how soon before my work out should I take it? Thanks!


    A BIG NO to your question

    Creatine is all about short term quick energy release it will do nothing for your long term endurance.

    As to noticing a big difference in strenth as opposed to a well structured programme thats highly debateable too.

    Reassess your workout dont look for a something thats missing that you never needed before
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    Aug 04, 2008 10:58 PM GMT
    Regardless of how you assess the mixed science on creatine, it doesn't appear to make sense for you. "Just getting back to working out" on a program of just 30 minutes three days each week suggests that your workout intensity is not all that high. Supplements may be helpful for ripped/built guys to bump up another level, but they're a fantasy crutch for guys who haven't been working at full intensity, volume, and weight. Stick to the basics. As to your energy, look at your diet, caloric intake before workouts, and sleep first. Those are much more likely culprits than insufficient creatine in your muscles, given your workout regime.

    A four-year old learning to ride a bike doesn't need a carbon-fiber frame. You don't need creatine.
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    Aug 04, 2008 11:03 PM GMT
    well done Boarder I couldnt have put it better myself if you could award a post merit points that would go to top of the class.

    Its about time we all stopped believing in fairytales! prince Charming wont arrive with your big muscles in a bag on the back of his stallion! It takes effort pills and potions are not the panacea increasing effort is
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    Aug 04, 2008 11:41 PM GMT
    I turn to the Mayo Clinic website when I am considering supplements. (Mayo Clinic is where doctors in my home town would send people when they were stumped, so maybe I'm a little biased in their favor. I have no idea if it is as well respected outside of the Midwest.)

    Here's what they have to say about creatine.

    Two things they mention have me considering creatine as the first supplement I'll ever try. First, they say there is strong scientific evidence that creatine will increase muscle mass. Unfortunately they do not explain how it does so. Second, they say that concerns about kidney damage are not as strong as in the past. On the other hand, they mention that there is limited study on the safety of creatine. And the list of side effects is scary. But the list of side effects on most drugs is pretty scary. I guess its a risk one has to decide whether to take or not.

    As far as energy is concerned, they say there is unclear or mixed evidence that creatine will enhance athletic performance and endurance. Obviously, some people here feel it has worked for them.
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    Aug 05, 2008 12:19 AM GMT
    now look at the significance of the volume of muscle mass and look at the impact it has when stopping creatine and you will find that this added mass is as a result of a two fold effect 1) increased water 2) increased energy expenditure

    Creatine will give you that short term ego boost but with that comes abuse, their is no evidence to suggest that a controlled dosage of creatine will cause kidney damage, but seldom do people take controlled measured doses people get results they want more they then increase usage of "insert supplement name" without realising the physical impacts. before everyone jumps on me just go read all the body building boards of "ive been on a continual cycle for 3 years" blah blah blah. Whilst they may not have any obvious long term effects now its not to say they wont have but I am not going to scare monger as you say formulate your own opinion.

    The fact still remains tho unless your training diet sleep and hydration are all 100% then dont waste your money as it simply becomes another excuse or a crutch.

    As to hypothetical "it worked for me" statements save that for the pink patch or slendertone brigade. Scientific evidence shows quite clearly that creatine does as it says on the tin, it offers increased short burst energy with no long lasting endurance effects.

    Now what you could tenuously claim is that if each session your perceived effort increases then so would your level of fitness and on the back of that endurance. As to what degree this would be higher than if you were to simply knuckle down and push harder each session then no controlled studies of a long enough duration exist that would test this in an unbiased way

    In short save your dollars get a trainer I know creatine is cheap but for return on investment you cant beat a quality trainer
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    Aug 06, 2008 11:56 PM GMT
    Thanks Everyone,
    You have given me a lot to think about. I really appreciate your input.
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    Aug 11, 2008 3:52 AM GMT
    GQjock saidThere's a lot of controversy on the creatine question
    supposedly it helps in ATP production
    ATP is the mainstay our bodies use to produce energy
    even if it does
    I think the potential for kidney damage outweighs its use
    Drink LOTS of water when you use the stuff...


    Yay! I get to be a total biochemistry nerd right now:

    Adenosine Tri-Phosphate (aka. "ATP") is the main source of energy used by our bodies; contracting your muscles is one of the activities that requires ATP. Energy is released from ATP when it loses a phosphate and becomes Adenosine DI-Phosphate (ADP). ADP can, in turn, lose its third phosphate to release more energy and become Adenosine MONO-Phosphate (AMP).

    What creatine does is it grabs on to free-floating phosphates and gives it to AMPs and ADPs so that they can become ATPs with more phosphates to lose and therefore provide more energy. Creatine occurs naturally in our body and its main job is to provide the body with readily available ATP for muscle contraction. Replenishing used ATP by creatine is much faster than replenishing used ATP from blood sugar.

    In theory, yes, taking creatine should help you with energy troubles.

    Okay, nerd-mode off...

    I usually ingest any pre-workout supplements about an hour or two before my workout. I take creatine, but it's already pre-mixed into my whey protein powder. I use NitroTech Hardcore Whey Protein.
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    Aug 11, 2008 4:15 AM GMT
    jeffy87 said

    Yay! I get to be a total biochemistry nerd right now:

    Adenosine Tri-Phosphate (aka. "ATP") is the main source of energy used by our bodies; contracting your muscles is one of the activities that requires ATP. Energy is released from ATP when it loses a phosphate and becomes Adenosine DI-Phosphate (ADP). ADP can, in turn, lose its third phosphate to release more energy and become Adenosine MONO-Phosphate (AMP).

    What creatine does is it grabs on to free-floating phosphates and gives it to AMPs and ADPs so that they can become ATPs with more phosphates to lose and therefore provide more energy. Creatine occurs naturally in our body and its main job is to provide the body with readily available ATP for muscle contraction. Replenishing used ATP by creatine is much faster than replenishing used ATP from blood sugar.

    In theory, yes, taking creatine should help you with energy troubles.

    Only if there is some theoretical reason to believe that your folk "poop out" is the same thing as ATP deficiency. And nothing in the OP's workout regime suggests that as a likely diagnosis. Creatine is just water retention unless you are doing a superintense workout that actually overtaxes your body's natural supply of creatine (and ATP). It isn't totally inconceivable that GeorgeE's 90 min per WEEK workout is doing that, but it is extremely unlikely.

    Guys who are ripped and defined and huge (or getting there) from intense workouts and repeatedly overcoming training plateaus need to stop advising newbies and low-intensity occasional exercisers to follow their own same programs, especially when it comes to supplements. I'm not anti-creatine in the least; I take it myself. But recommending supplements with total disregard for or ignorance of the actual physical condition, diet, and training program of the individual is irresponsible.