Online tracking/ calorie counter.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 11, 2007 2:17 PM GMT
    I have recently had some revealing moments and would like some advice. I do cardio, am already in pretty good shape, but since I am 35, I am building it up a little fat in the midsection. Up until a few days ago, I didn't understand why. I then began to focus in on my diet. I typically do an hour in the gym daily and have stepped up the cardio to burn the fat off and decreased my calories and fat.

    It is realtively easy to track calories burnt on the elliptical and target my heart rate for fat burn (keeping it between 111 and 130 for an hour)

    Diet on the other hand is not so easy. I was using an online log where I can track by searching for foods then adding them. There are many flaws I am finding in that method.

    For instance, I logged the 6 miller lite that I drank on a Friday night, and the log recorded 0% alcohol.

    Long story short, my calculations were brutally rendered. I began breaking everything down for myself down to the tomato slices! It is too much work, but has revealed some of the issues of why I thought my fat intake was ok (24% on the online counter) vs. the 34% I calculated by really breaking everything down.

    So, now to my question... Does anyone know of a more reliable online tracker? I would also love to have one that can sync well with the data that a heart rate monitor can extract from a workout--that way all I have to do is track the food.

    Can anyone suggest anything that has worked well for them?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 11, 2007 6:55 PM GMT
    Any on-line resource is only going to have some general approximations of nutrition information. Even the nutrition information on food labels can only be an average value, unless it's a product made from large volumes of well-analyzed bulk materials. The real world is just too heterogenous to conform to neat tables. It's probably futile to get too anal about the last few percentage points.

    Actually, beers should fall into the well-characterized category. The regulations are weird though. I had some friends who opened a small brewery, and they wanted to put all the specific gravity, carbs, and alcohol information on the label. The ATF wouldn't let them - it's against the law. Now the FDA is making noises about REQUIRING this sort of information on the label. Your tax dollars at work. In circles.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Aug 11, 2007 8:48 PM GMT
    6 miller lites will "not" help your waist line...FYI ;-)

    i recommed www.nutritiondata.com to my clients.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2007 12:07 PM GMT
    here is the site i have used in the past. www.thecaloriecounter.com My advice is get the basics down and don't drive yourself crazy with it. You'll do more counting that eating and living. It will drive you insane. You know as well as anyone else if you drink a few beers or eat a piece of cake you will have to do extra cardio to burn it off. Also stress and not sleeping well can effect your fat around your belly. Good luck and buy the way your looking great keep it up
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2007 7:19 PM GMT
    I find planning what I'll eat is a bit easier than retroactively calculating calories, but that's just me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2007 9:12 PM GMT
    With regard to calorie counting, here's a low-tech method that I find convenient for me and my eating habits:

    I eat a fairly small variety of foods and usually in fairly constant quantities (what I refer to as my personal "standard serving"). So to keep an approximate count of calories over the course of a day I first begin by making up a number of 1" x 3" in cards (of various colors cut from 3x5 cards). For convenience, the color of the card is generally representative of a food type (e.g. dairy, vegetable, fruit, etc.). Each card has a food item written on it, the number of calories (for my standard serving of that food item) and the size of the standard serving).

    I begin each day with the compartmented array of cards filled and an empty bowl. As I eat/drink things over the course of a day, upon each helping I remove the appropriate card from the array and add it to bowl. At the end of the day I simply count up the number of calories for all the cards in the bowl. Then empty the bowl, putting each card back into its appropriate compartment in the supply--and I'm ready for the next day.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2007 9:13 PM GMT
    I forgot to mention that I do the same thing for my cardio and work-out excercises--except that I subtract the associated number of calories from the daily total.