Patriotism: ignorant human emotion or healthy love?

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    Jul 04, 2012 6:39 PM GMT
    the timing seems right lol but i feel that patriotism is always looked on as positive.

    yet for someone to live in a country their whole lives and never travel and to say their country is the best... seems very ignorant to me. I get it, you love your family cuz they're yours, its just human. you think your family members are the best but isnt that just a slight form of naive ignorance?
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    Jul 04, 2012 6:42 PM GMT
    "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel."

    (Samuel Johnson, 1775)
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    Jul 04, 2012 6:45 PM GMT
    track_boi saidthe timing seems right lol but i feel that patriotism is always looked on as positive.

    yet for someone to live in a country their whole lives and never travel and to say their country is the best... seems very ignorant to me. I get it, you love your family cuz they're yours, its just human. you think your family members are the best but isnt that just a slight form of naive ignorance?


    Who says patriots don't travel? Who says patriots say their country is the best?
    I think you're venting, which is fine, just don't pose it at a discussion topic.

    Personally I never understood patriotism. The country one was born in doesn't make the person. That country's good qualities don't make the person good. That country's soccer team's success doesn't make the citizen a more valuable person.
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    Jul 04, 2012 6:58 PM GMT
    Patriotism = self respect
    self criticism = strengthening ones' self and ones' nation
    dealing with any criticism constructively = idealism
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    Jul 04, 2012 8:56 PM GMT
    I don't believe there exists such a thing as an ignorant human emotion.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:02 PM GMT
    There's a continuum, to be honest, as far as I see it.

    quiet self-assurance --> moderate, considered, self-analyzing patriotism --> uncritical, non-analytic patriotism --> jingoism

    The first two are fine. The last two cause problems amongst nations, and is often used to paper-over real issues that should be addressed internally... as if you can't be self-critical and self-analyzing, you won't want to change anything. Which often serves the causes of certain polities wielding power.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:03 PM GMT
    Patriotism is buying lots of bumper stickers and pin-on buttons and flags to adorn your property.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:04 PM GMT
    As long as we're doing sweeping generalizations:
    You are 22. What the Fu*k do you know about anything!
    icon_lol.gificon_wink.gif
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:08 PM GMT
    Patriotism is about taking pride in the positive things your country has to offer. It doesn't mean you think you're the best in everything or that you don’t acknowledge where other countries do better.

    At least that's how i think of it.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:10 PM GMT
    What if I've been all over the world and still think my country is the best?
  • Havasu

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    Jul 04, 2012 9:16 PM GMT
    I always thought American patriotism was more like wearing a football jersey for the winning team. While I pay taxes and support my own country, I don't particularly think I'm a superior human for being born here instead of any other country. There are so many different types of people here that the only common bond is that we are all diverse. And I really don't believe that the US is even the leader in "freedom" anymore, judging by the fact countries like Canada are more progressive with gay marriage. Some Americans are pure genius, many aren't. Look around at Walmart sometime. If I scan my Tumblr and Twitter feeds, I often think the US has some of the most unhappy people in the world. People's patriotism increases depending on world events. I'm proud to be an American when "we" are winning all those Olympic medals. How much training involved me as an American citizen? None. Maybe some of my tax dollars were spent in the process somewhere, but I did none of the work and can't take any of the credit.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:17 PM GMT
    IMHO, Patriotism is healthy and needed. However, patriotism cloaked in fanaticism is a detriment to all.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:20 PM GMT
    WhyWhySee said
    Stuttershock saidPatriotism is about taking pride in the positive things your country has to offer. It doesn't mean you think you're the best in everything or that you don’t acknowledge where other countries do better.

    At least that's how i think of it.

    How can someone be proud of something that other people accomplished?


    I don’t know... why do people feel sentimental over anything? It's an emotional yearning to connect with something that is beyond yourself as an individual. Perhaps it just fulfils a need to fit into a bigger picture.

    Maybe pride is the wrong word, perhaps it's just an enthusiasm to share something that was part of your everyday existence that others have never experienced.
  • Zorain

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    Jul 04, 2012 9:20 PM GMT
    though the essence of question is not fully conveyed but i would say that all human emotions are explainable if u have ur own image at stake........if u want to give reasons.....than every wrong deed also has.....and we are humans we are too busy reasoning for ur own selves..........
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:25 PM GMT
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:26 PM GMT
    Larkin saidWhat if I've been all over the world and still think my country is the best?
    You didn't have enough sex in the other countries.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:26 PM GMT
    "That public virtue which among the ancients was denominated patriotism, is derived from a strong sense of our own interest in the preservation and prosperity of the free government of which we are members."
    Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776)
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:27 PM GMT
    I personally have no need to feel a sense of patriotism because I had no control over where I was born and brought up. I certainly can say that I grew up a happy child, but I owe that more to my parents than the country, state, and town in which I was raised. I feel that happiness is what you make of it regardless of where you live.

    Territories and governments always change, so what we have today may not necessarily be around tomorrow. Who knows if years from now the US will get bigger or states start to secede from the union to become independent countries? Maybe Texans are more proud to be Texans rather than Americans after all, hehe icon_cool.gif
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    Einstein said nationalism was like the measles. . . an infantile disease.

    Cocooning ourselves with patriotic symbols, like the flag, or shopworn cliches, like "we're the best country in the world," is a superficial way to shield ourselves from the enormous obstacles now facing us. Constantly giving ourselves props won't help.







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    Jul 04, 2012 9:35 PM GMT
    LittleDudeWithMuscles saidEinstein said nationalism was like the measles. . . an infantile disease.

    Cocooning ourselves with patriotic symbols, like the flag, or shopworn cliches, like "we're the best country in the world," is a superficial way to shield ourselves from the enormous obstacles now facing us. Constantly giving ourselves props won't help.









    I agree, but Patriotism and Nationalism are different.

    George Orwell said:
    Nationalism is ‘the worst enemy of peace’. According to him, nationalism is a feeling that one’s country is superior to another in all respects, while patriotism is merely a feeling of admiration for a way of life.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:36 PM GMT
    Larkin saidWhat if I've been all over the world and still think my country is the best?


    I think that traveling and seeing other parts of the world makes you love your country more because of that connection with home.

    It took me traveling outside of the US to make me love the US more. And I wouldn't trade that experience for anything.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:45 PM GMT
    Stuttershock said
    LittleDudeWithMuscles saidEinstein said nationalism was like the measles. . . an infantile disease.

    Cocooning ourselves with patriotic symbols, like the flag, or shopworn cliches, like "we're the best country in the world," is a superficial way to shield ourselves from the enormous obstacles now facing us. Constantly giving ourselves props won't help.





    I agree, but Patriotism and Nationalism are different.

    George Orwell said:
    Nationalism is ‘the worst enemy of peace’. According to him, nationalism is a feeling that one’s country is superior to another in all respects, while patriotism is merely a feeling of admiration for a way of life.



    True, but therein lies the problem. For most people, 'patriotism' is defined by the former, not the latter.
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    Jul 04, 2012 9:59 PM GMT
    LittleDudeWithMuscles saidTrue, but therein lies the problem. For most people, 'patriotism' is defined by the former, not the latter.


    Then we should be diligent to clarify the misconception (and to quote my favourite movie/book), "call each thing by its right name".

    Because it is hard to simultaneously defend something you think is a positive influence when it shares it's name with something you also believe to be negative.
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    Jul 04, 2012 10:02 PM GMT
    Stuttershock said
    LittleDudeWithMuscles saidTrue, but therein lies the problem. For most people, 'patriotism' is defined by the former, not the latter.


    Then we should be diligent to clarify the misconception (and to quote my favourite movie/book), "call each thing by its right name".

    Because it is hard to simultaneously defend something you think is a positive influence when it shares it's name with something you also believe to be negative.
    Completely off-topic, but that's exactly what's happened to the word "gay." It's become a negative word, even though the REAL word(s) for it still retain their original meaning (same gender attraction).
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    Jul 04, 2012 10:03 PM GMT
    WhyWhySee saidThis was on Facebook the other day. I thought it was interesting.
    548229_470585352969453_105684402_n.jpg


    That's basically how I feel too. I prefer to be proud of things I can control. Labels can change at any time according to circumstance. Besides, no one is 100% anything because humans have always migrated and intermingled throughout our species' history.