Any teachers here?

  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Jul 09, 2012 1:53 AM GMT
    I'm thinking about stopping pursuing my Masters in TV/journalism, and purse a masters in secondary education. Does anyone have advice on school, etc., and how does the job market look? Is it improving? Ideally I'd like to teach English/Social Studies/History. Thanks in advance.
  • Cdnontherun

    Posts: 69

    Jul 09, 2012 2:57 AM GMT
    As a school principal, I'll throw in my 2 cents. First of all, if you are looking for an easy career with three months off, look elsewhere. Teaching is not, nor has been for that matter, a cake walk. However, if you are still interested, it can be a great profession. You can be creative and really make a difference in people's lives. As to your choices, I'm going to tell you something that the education schools won't: teaching jobs in history and social studies are practically non-existant. English is a bit easier and adding an English as a Second Language endorsement would give you a lot more options. Finally, the job market is looking better. Hope that helps.
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    Jul 09, 2012 3:05 AM GMT
    I am a teacher 12 years in...it is absolutely a great profession if you are in it for the right reasons as said above, teaching high school can be challenging with today's kids but if you are in it for the kids then go for it
    As for jobs it depends on where you are looking, every place is different you'll really have to research the place you want to end up in
    Good luck!
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    Jul 09, 2012 3:11 AM GMT
    I would tend to agree with the above posters, and also add that the "high demand" teaching jobs are math, science, and special ed. A lot of the humanities teachers I've known have had more luck using their special ed certification (when they're dual certified) to find work.

    Look for a program with a strong internship program, especially in urban education. Some MAT programs do the minimum student teaching requirement, but you'll really learn the profession once you're in the classroom... all the courses on development and learning, or race, class, and gender are great to think about, but your day to day work will be learned from a good mentor teacher and in a school with a solid administration.

    good luck! the first few years are the hardest - be ready to make some sacrifices to free time.
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    Jul 09, 2012 3:32 AM GMT
    If you want something bad enough, you'll do anything it takes to make it happen.
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    Jul 09, 2012 3:45 AM GMT
    If you want something bad enough, you'll do anything it takes to make it happen. -Paulflexes

    I couldn't have said it better myself. Teaching is only for those who can't not do it. If you can be fulfilled doing anything else, then it's probably not right for you.
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    Jul 09, 2012 3:52 AM GMT
    I love being a teacher. I teach high school English, and it is my joy. Understand that it is more than a career; it is a lifestyle. The career dominates your life. While there may be vacation times, the hours you put in during the school year are long.

    Also, English has more grading. It takes a great deal of time to grade those essays for content as well as form.

    Certainly it is a rewarding profession, but it is a demanding, high-stress field.

    I couldn't give it up. It is my passion in life.
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    Jul 09, 2012 3:56 AM GMT
    Also, I would really advise that you do student teaching. My state allows alternatives around that; however, a semester of student teaching under a really good master teacher can make a world of difference in your surviving the first three years of teaching.
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    Jul 09, 2012 3:59 AM GMT
    you really need to do a practicum, what education courses "teach" is not what you learn when you are in an actual classroom, nothing beats that education!
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    Jul 09, 2012 4:02 AM GMT
    I always loved teaching.. was a music teacher in school, as well as private english and sciences teacher and tutor... I aim to teach at university after I finish medical school actually

    Only thing is.. its a lot of hard work for little money.. but its rewarding enough on a personal level to recommend it icon_smile.gif
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Jul 09, 2012 6:33 AM GMT

    I'm not sure how i'd go in an institutional setting, but I absolutely adore teaching privately, in workshops, small groups, and one-on-one. It is definitely something that you must put a lot of yourself into. The level of responsibility you take on is vast, because of the level of impact you can have. A good teacher makes all the difference. Wish you all the best.
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    Jul 09, 2012 6:59 AM GMT
    RJ.PTA.Meeting Bitches! Someone left glitter in the teacher's filing cabinet! We need a roll call, strip down and need the mommas to paddle their babies!icon_mad.gif
  • tyler_helm

    Posts: 299

    Dec 15, 2012 3:36 AM GMT
    The Humanities in California are a Dime a dozen. Math, Science or a math Science combo can write their own ticket. In California you need to have a credential reguardless of the degree you have. Network with a school now see of you can do an internship or something.