Question for the physical therapists here.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 05, 2008 5:53 PM GMT
    My podiatrist recently told me my ankle drop won't ever go away. She said I am going to need an AFO brace for the rest of my life.

    I say bullshiticon_exclaim.gif

    Is she right? Are there exercises I can do to lessen/alleviate the problem? The AFO brace is a monstrosity and I refused to wear it as it made my skin crawl.
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    Aug 06, 2008 2:41 PM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidIs it your left foot? Just curious.

    I would probably recommend to get another opinion in person by another professional. I don't think anyone could do you justice by telling you what to do or not to do without an actual examination.


    It's actually the right foot (stroke-related).
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    Aug 07, 2008 7:17 PM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidOh my gosh! Very sorry that you had a stroke. What was that induced from? Curious here. You look quite young.


    Diabetes
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    Aug 07, 2008 7:29 PM GMT
    I dont know a thing about ankle drop. But is it something that muscle development can help? Or muscle and nerve development together can help?

    I am just wondering about balancing exercises. Like first standing on the one foot, then moving up to standing on a foam pad, then on to a bosu ball.

    I didnt have anything like what ankle drop sounds like, but I couldnt stand on one foot for more than a few seconds and my trainer put me thru balancing exercises to both develop the muscle strength and nerve coordination.
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    Aug 19, 2008 5:25 AM GMT
    It really depends on how severe the stroke was? Also how long ago you had the stroke, as you will probably regain the most in terms of ms strength within a year of the stroke, after that the recovery is not so great, in terms of big ms gains. I would recommend an evaluation by a Physical Therapist, you might benefit from NMES, or Neuromuscular Re-Education which basically helps stimulate the nerve to contract, it might help you. Hope I shed some insight.

    Jon, PT