Staying home going to University VS Going away

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2012 3:39 AM GMT
    I currently stay at home and go to university because of costs as my parents are willing to pay for tuition but not costs of room and board. But as I'm nearing the end of my time at school I have to wonder how it would have been to go away for university. I have a lot of friends who went away to school but had to take out huge amounts in loans. And I didn't want that for myself since the economy is so bad anyway. But do you think I'm missing out?

    So did you guys go away to school or stay at home?
    Which do you think is better not owing loans or have fun away at university?
    Let me know your opinions icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2012 3:44 AM GMT
    If you like being a drunk asshole every night of the week then it's okay.
    If you prefer to study on weekdays than binge on alcohol, stay home.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2012 3:50 AM GMT
    Or you can rent a 3 bedroom house and get 10 roommates to split the costs. icon_lol.gif
  • tautomer

    Posts: 1010

    Jul 11, 2012 3:56 AM GMT
    I moved 2000 miles away to go to college and had to take out a very large amount of loans. It was one of the best decisions I have ever made. The education I got there, and all of the friends and experiences I have gained have no monetary value at all. Truly priceless.

    Mind you, I took out these loans know that I'll be able to pay them off. With the degree I am working on (currently in grad school), I can easily start off with 6 figures. If I didn't have plans to get a PhD I would not have done what I did.

    College is what you make of it. Would I have had a good experience if I stayed in New Jersey for college? I'm sure. Nevertheless, I don't know how close it would have come to living in Montana, partly because the climate there (I thrive in the cold and mountains).
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Jul 11, 2012 3:57 AM GMT
    I went away to college, and I'm glad I did.....I discovered there were people far different than me in the world. Also, I learned more about my home state at the time (Georgia) and yeah....I did get homesick.

    Went to a small school about 130 miles from Atlanta and did I ever miss civilization, however, the experience overall was great and wouldn't have traded it for anything.
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    Jul 11, 2012 4:02 AM GMT
    Go away. I stayed home and regretted it. icon_neutral.gif
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    Jul 11, 2012 4:34 AM GMT
    I did both... there are advantages and disadvantages to both
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    Jul 11, 2012 4:56 AM GMT
    I went about 2000 km from home to go to school and have not regretted it at all. I went in not knowing a single person, and that forced me to come out of my shell a bit and meet people. Have made some amazing friends and actually plan on staying in the area once I'm down my undergrad.

    For me personally i needed that experience of being far from home and living on my own. I actually prefer it, but it helped me appreciate my family and friends back home a little more.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2012 5:00 AM GMT
    My parents had a fund (4 figure - nothing extravagant) saved for me when I graduated high school. They told me I could use it toward college, or a car if I went in the military.

    I chose the US Navy and paid cash for a recently-used car (3 years old).

    However, that wasn't the highlight of my military journey. The highlight was receiving the Desert Storm service ribbon.

    ...just something to chew on while you ponder the decision. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 11, 2012 5:02 AM GMT
    I think you should stay attend university for at least one semester, just to see what it's like and get the whole college experience. How far away from home would you be?
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    Jul 11, 2012 10:57 AM GMT
    When I went away to college it did increase costs significantly. I got a scholarship which covered just over half and I was paying out of state fees which was even worse. But the whole experience was worth it.

    Moving to a different environment which requires you to adapt, make new friends, explore and yet remained focused on school work really helped with personal growth and development. Some of my closest friends are now college buddies and the responsibility and independence it taught was invaluable. Totally worth every penny IMO.

    But go for every scholarship you can to try cut loan requirements. Huge loans are not fun to repay...especially when you're trying to get your feet on the ground after you graduate.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jul 11, 2012 11:39 AM GMT
    I think it's a great choice to stay at home during college. Many of these people who went away may end up back with their folks when they can't afford a place to live on their own because of debt.

    Just do what you can to be independent and get out there socially.
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    Jul 11, 2012 12:22 PM GMT
    I lived on-campus as an undergraduate and in an off-campus apartment for law school even though my parents' home was 35 miles away in the burbs. The experience enriched my life a hundred times over.
    But I didn't pay off the last of my student loans until I was 42.
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    Jul 11, 2012 12:47 PM GMT
    Comrade_Cranky said
    TexDef07 saidI lived on-campus as an undergraduate and in an off-campus apartment for law school even though my parents' home was 35 miles away in the burbs. The experience enriched my life a hundred times over.
    But I didn't pay off the last of my student loans until I was 42.

    Wow. I guess being a lickspittle to corporate overlords doesn't pay as well as you'd imagine.

    A lickspittle to corporate overlords? It sounds like the Daily Worker circa 1935. JP, you're usually clever enough to come up with something a little less dated than this.
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    Jul 11, 2012 1:15 PM GMT
    I didn't go away to school and I regret it every day. Don't worry about the money, you'll find a way to pay it off if you're doing something you love. It's not about partying, it's about getting out there in the world, learning to be independent and meeting new people/making new friends.
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    Jul 11, 2012 1:25 PM GMT
    In life you can play it safe or stretch the boundaries of your comfort zone... I think some regret the former, but ive never heard of anyone regretting the latter. College is THE major, critical period in life for the latter.

    Take a risk and go somewhere new and exciting. It will force you to learn more about yourself, shake you open to new ideas and perspectives, make you form a whole new circle of friends, and give you a clean fresh start with reputation (near home, you'll always be who youve always been, no matter how much you change.)

    Ppl who stay home for college always hang with the same crowd they always have, they rarely change at all, and I always find it sad and a little pittiful.
  • cyberwrassler

    Posts: 88

    Jul 11, 2012 1:29 PM GMT
    go away...leave home..spread your wings...enjoy the full experience. Unless money is the main issue..then you have to weigh your options.

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    Jul 11, 2012 1:39 PM GMT
    How far away are we talking? For me, I had to get away from Allentown, PA or I would go insane. I really wanted to go to NYC for school but I knew I couldn't afford it and I knew myself enough to know it would have been overwhelming. I opted for Temple University in Philadelphia. It was still close to home (about a 1.5 hour drive) but still a world away.

    If your parents are covering tuition, finding a part time job and finding a place to split between friends sounds like a good idea. You get to host parties, go to parties, learn how to deal with people and conflicts, more in depth time and money management, more individual freedom etc.

    The loans are annoying once you leave school, but you'll pay it off in time.
  • BardBear

    Posts: 533

    Jul 11, 2012 2:55 PM GMT
    I applied to five schools, three were out of state. My parents encouraged me to go to those schools and I selected the one farthest away.

    Just outside of Fargo, North Dakota.

    Within a year and a half (covering two winters), I had left...to Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Talk about remote!

    But I wouldn't change it for the world, I tell you. I learned what I like about life and, well, men, far from home, able to experience the world on my own terms and felt the heat when I truly screwed up (it happened on occasion.)

    However, don't live life with regret. You have no idea the importance education is, period. Home or away, that is the main point.

    Just, for me, going away was perfect. My brother? He went away and was back in six weeks, the Mama's Boy. So it is really how you look at it.

    Peace,
    Bardy
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    Jul 11, 2012 3:04 PM GMT
    I say, go away if you can afford it. It is awesome to get a completely different experience, one you just won't get by staying at home. But if it would result in an unmanageable debt level, especially given how bad the job market is for grads now, I could understand how it wouldn't be worth it.

    Comrade_Cranky said
    TexDef07 said
    Comrade_Cranky said
    TexDef07 saidI lived on-campus as an undergraduate and in an off-campus apartment for law school even though my parents' home was 35 miles away in the burbs. The experience enriched my life a hundred times over.
    But I didn't pay off the last of my student loans until I was 42.

    Wow. I guess being a lickspittle to corporate overlords doesn't pay as well as you'd imagine.

    A lickspittle to corporate overlords? It sounds like the Daily Worker circa 1935. JP, you're usually clever enough to come up with something a little less dated than this.

    I'm nostalgic for the old insults. Would you have preferred "enemy of the people"?


    Just exactly what is up with you these days? Feeling extra cranky? Don't make me get all defensive.
  • Sportsfan1

    Posts: 479

    Jul 11, 2012 3:20 PM GMT
    Both have their advantages and disadvantages. I was very fortunate that I did both. My parents did not help at all towards going to a university so I was more or less forced to stay at home. My experience at the university was of incalculable value. I did not have to accrue any debt by having to get some student loans. While living at home, I worked part-time to pay for the university. Later after I started working I was able to save a lot of money to go away to school in a different country. That was one of the most valuable experiences of my life. A different country, a different language, a different culture, meeting new people. I cannot tell you how rewarding that was for me. Only you can make this decision. Which ever one you choose, do not have any regrets, everything works out for the best. Wishing you all the very best!
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    Jul 11, 2012 3:51 PM GMT
    I went away for college and I have no regrets. Going away for college teaches you how to grow up and forces you to face the realities of being an adult. On the upside however, you have freedom and ability to do what you want. Just make sure that if you do move away that you have a smart and well strategize plan into how you go about it.

    On the other hand, staying home is not bad either. You've got the rest of your life to live away from your parents and it would be better not to owe any loans because once you get a job, tax and bills will eat up your paycheck.

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    Jul 11, 2012 5:40 PM GMT
    A lot of what you guys say is true. I have gotten comfortable just living at home and being friends with the same group for the past like 10 years. It is nice to have my parents pay for all my bills and not worry about that. The reason I was so adamant about not taking out loans was because I read a lot of books on it with statistics and sob stories of the millions who are in debt. And that made me want to turn away from loans at all costs. Since I'm nearing the end of my undergrad degree.


    I guess there's always grad school to go away right??
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    Jul 11, 2012 5:45 PM GMT
    IceBucket saidGo away. I stayed home and regretted it. icon_neutral.gif


    DITTO. There is a great deal of maturation and confidence building that takes place when away from the security of Mom and Dad's home.

    However, as others have said, if you are not assured a good paying job when you get out, it would be foolish to rack up a shit load of debt.
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Jul 11, 2012 5:55 PM GMT
    WestCoastGuy saidA lot of what you guys say is true. I have gotten comfortable just living at home and being friends with the same group for the past like 10 years. It is nice to have my parents pay for all my bills and not worry about that. The reason I was so adamant about not taking out loans was because I read a lot of books on it with statistics and sob stories of the millions who are in debt. And that made me want to turn away from loans at all costs. Since I'm nearing the end of my undergrad degree.


    I guess there's always grad school to go away right??


    You're making good decisions it seems. I went to the opposite coast for college and it changed my life trajectory immensely. One of the best decisions I've ever made. But I went on a fellowship that paid for it.

    My roommate had stayed in-state for undergrad. But he went 2,000 miles away for law school afterwards at a very stereotypically "collegy" ollege. So he saved money, but then later on got the going-away experience he craved. Best of both worlds.