New York is [b]NOT[/b] the center of the universe!

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    Aug 06, 2008 1:56 AM GMT
    There are a huge number of guys on here who live in New York. Many of them seem to have no concept that there is more to this country and more to the World than just that one city. I could very be wrong, but all the guys from NY seem to have an arrogance about them.

    I've visited NYC once. I found it incredibly expensive and crowded with some very rude people. Traffic was also horrible.

    I was impressed with Broadway and the museums, but that aside, it is someplace I really never want to live, and not really a place I care to visit all that often.

    So New Yorkers... Tell this Texan what makes NY a better place than Texas with its wide-open spaces, tight Wranglers, outstanding economy, and dirt cheap housing prices?
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    Aug 06, 2008 2:13 AM GMT
    I think it's all about someone's personality. I absolutely LOVED living in NYC. There are TONS of things to do, you don't need a car, the food is amazing, there's always something new opening, the people I met were all wicked friendly (totally OPPOSITE of South Florida), etc.... I am trying my hardest to move back actually. The one thing I missed was nature.

    But, my limited experience with Texas was not good. So, I wouldn't pick it to live anytime soon. Granted I was in Houston, but there was WAY too much sprawl, way too much of a reliance on cars, too much concrete and the people didn't seem all that nice to me.

    I'd pick NYC. icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 06, 2008 2:29 AM GMT
    Between Chicago and NYC, I'd pick Chicago too - for all the reasons you mentioned. icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 06, 2008 2:32 AM GMT
    BigSETXjock saidThere are a huge number of guys on here who live in New York. Many of them seem to have no concept that there is more to this country and more to the World than just that one city. I could very be wrong, but all the guys from NY seem to have an arrogance about them.

    I've visited NYC once. I found it incredibly expensive and crowded with some very rude people. Traffic was also horrible.

    I was impressed with Broadway and the museums, but that aside, it is someplace I really never want to live, and not really a place I care to visit all that often.

    So New Yorkers... Tell this Texan what makes NY a better place than Texas with its wide-open spaces, tight Wranglers, outstanding economy, and dirt cheap housing prices?
    Amen. I've never to NYC, but I deal with lots of NYC people over the phone. We have to discuss their drama first before we can ever get any business done. I can't stand that.
  • joeindallas

    Posts: 484

    Aug 06, 2008 2:33 AM GMT
    Good and Bad everywhere. BTW Upper East Side and Manhattan is not all of New York. If you visit NYC during any Work day you have MILLIONS of people who do not live there. Many of the people you might call arrogant well other than Mister Trump probally were not born in New York.
    Yes it is crowded but land in the East is Valuable. Manhattan is as large or small as the Airport in Dallas/FortWorth.
    Two, Bad things I can tell you about Texas BUSH, CHEENEY and the 4 000 Hot men and women died for a LIE.

    Hard for me to say that Boston guy here and Yankee (baseball) hater
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    Aug 06, 2008 2:36 AM GMT
    BigSETXjock saidThere are a huge number of guys on here who live in New York. Many of them seem to have no concept that there is more to this country and more to the World than just that one city. I could very be wrong, but all the guys from NY seem to have an arrogance about them.
    I've visited NYC once. I found it incredibly expensive and crowded with some very rude people. Traffic was also horrible.
    I was impressed with Broadway and the museums, but that aside, it is someplace I really never want to live, and not really a place I care to visit all that often.
    So New Yorkers... Tell this Texan what makes NY a better place than Texas with its wide-open spaces, tight Wranglers, outstanding economy, and dirt cheap housing prices?

    Anyone can spot out more negatives than positives . . .

    The fact that so many cultures and backgrounds come together in one place. Walk in my college, one of the most international educational instutues in NYC, you'll see what I'm talking about.

    The fact that each borough is like a seperate city. If you drive or walk through each boroughs neighborhoods, you'll notice how significantly different each borough is.

    Each borough has something special about it
    - The Bronx is the only borough connected to the mainland. The contrast from Mott Haven or Soundview to Co-Op City and Riverdale as far as culture, archetecture, and landscaping just showcases a portion of the variety you'll find withing a borough. Edgar Allen Poe's cottage is still up in the north bronx.
    - Brooklyn has a very avant-garde and artistic community along the L trainline; Coney Island, the city's amusement park and Prospect Park/Botanical Garden.
    - Staten Island has a very suburban feel to it, it has it's own Ferry & the Staten-Island Railroad. Plust it's closest to New Jersey
    - Manhattan is the greatest place for those that love archetecture. From the Cathedrals, to the Skyscrapers, to the Cloisters (a museum in upper manhattan), along with Manhattan being a prime spot for all the entertainment events. And there's always something open in Manhattan - even if it's just a Truckers Diner at 3:00am after coming from a concert
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    NYC isn't far from the suburbs and prime hiking areas like the Hudson Valley's Pine Meadow Lake Loop & Breakneck Ridge as well as Bear Mountain and the Old Croatian Aquaduct Trial. Long Island is full of beaches and camping areas as well.
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    The rudeness thing is such a weak argument.

    People are rude everywhere. Politeness does tend to fall off to the wayside given the extremely large number of people in NYC. In a small town, everyone knows everyone; but when it comes down to absolute strangers, it becomes a matter of personal space and annoyance with the same rude treatment.

    I say excuse me. I get annoyed when people are inconsiderate of those around them. However, some people are also VERY unaware of what's going on - ESPECIALLY tourists. When there's a flow of people walking through Times Square, the most annoying thing is when someone stops dead in the middle of the sidewalk and decides to point and take pictures of tbe buildings. In my opinion - the tourists are much more inconsiderate than "new yorkers": if you want to take pictures and oogle at the buildings, then step off to the side - OUT of the way. New Yorkers are more than happy to answer questions if they can help. I've seen 3 or 4 people jump in just to help one person get to their destination on the subways. Sometimes people stop me and ask for directions to so and such and I say what I know or say I don't know, and they're usually pretty greatful.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    I'd love to continue, but I don't think anyone's actually going to read this whole rant thing . . . .
  • joeindallas

    Posts: 484

    Aug 06, 2008 2:38 AM GMT
    maverick I live in Dallas not an HONEST person here.
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    Aug 06, 2008 2:40 AM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidBlind, I read your whole rant. I'm sorry if my post sounded like I generalized. From what little I've read from your posts you seem like a sweet and genuine guy.

    awww thank you, my posts precede me lol
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    Aug 06, 2008 2:58 AM GMT
    BigSETXjock saidSo New Yorkers... Tell this Texan what makes NY a better place than Texas with its wide-open spaces, tight Wranglers, outstanding economy, and dirt cheap housing prices?

    Outstanding economy is only indicative of current status and recent history leading up to the point we're at now. Our economy wasn't ALWAYS this bad - but I'll admit it is MUCH worse than when I was 10 years old. Also you must admit - if you visit tourist traps, then you will pay tourist trap prices. Villa Pizza across the street from the Port-Authority on 42nd St/8th Ave is notorious for their freakishly high prices for a basic pizza slice and soda ($4.00+ anyone?). However, that is tourist central. They have five to six BIG widescreen High Def flat TV monitors that display the overhead menus. And you wonder why it costs so much to eat there? It's all about milking the tourists for profits. Now if you find somewhere off to the side, you wont be paying so much for food, but most tourists will go where stuff is readily available, not where stuff is the cheapest.

    I'm a fan of the surbubs - I don't really like 100% Grey and Glass nor am I fond of 100% Green and Crass. However, I enjoy where I live for what it's worth and what is has to offer.

    Pride can be mistaken for arrogance very easily. Think about what NYC has to offer: Columbia University and NYU; the Museums (the Met and MoMa); the Dance Companies and Dance Schools (Broadway Dance Center, Alvin Aliey, American Ballet Theatre), all of Broadway's Theatres, the TriBeCa Film Festival, the Zoos in Brooklyn, the Bronx and Manhattan; the Botanial Gardens of Queens, the Bronx, and Brooklyn; the beach of Staten Island, the Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn; the resturants; among other things. There really is something for everyone.

    But you really can't judge a location when you've only visited for a short term. So you come to NYC for a weekend, go to a few events, festivals, etc. and you get bumped into and ignored... thus that's grounds for assuming everyone's rude...
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    Ohhh Trust me I got more to say icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 06, 2008 3:24 AM GMT
    i tend to agree with most of the posters here. New York is a great city to visit, but i could not imagine being there putting up with all the people, traffic, garbage and expense everyday. andppl who live there tend to think that it is the greatest place in the world and no where else can compare which amazes me when i think i can live else where, own a hosue and a car, travel and enjoy a social life, while most of the ppl i know that live there jsut struggle to pay rent for a 500 sq ft apartment.icon_confused.gif
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    Aug 06, 2008 4:12 AM GMT
    BigSETXjock saidSo New Yorkers... Tell this Texan what makes NY a better place than Texas with its wide-open spaces, tight Wranglers, outstanding economy, and dirt cheap housing prices?


    So Texas is the center of the universe? Well, at least it isn't Scranton...
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    Aug 06, 2008 4:25 AM GMT
    I lived in New York for 15 years, and only left because I fell hard for a Virginia boy.

    But let me tell you, this myth about the rudeness of New Yorkers is persistent nonsense. I know people there who have walked 20 blocks out of the way to help some out-of-towner find his way around.

    The culture of New York is brisk. Someone mentioned in an earlier post that the East Coast style of interaction is teasing, sarcasm, and sometimes mild insult, and that's true. It is a place that values verbal acuity and wit, and tends to value people more by what they do than what they have, since the ordinary status symbols (big house, fancy car) are not applicable to a place where everyone lives in small apartments and doesn't own an automobile, by and large (there are exceptions). Socializing is done in restaurants, coffee shops, diners, clubs, because no one owns enough space to socialize at home.

    It's just a whole different lifestyle, but it's exciting and mentally stimulating, and Manhattan contains a healthy share of the most interesting, accomplished, and physically stunning people on the planet.

    Chicago is nice too, but the culture is deadly earnest.

    I am not a fan of the west coast culture. And I've been to Texas many times, and I can't think of a single thing there that interests me even slightly.
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    Aug 06, 2008 4:52 AM GMT
    I'd take a $2000 a month 5th floor walk-up in the West Village over Beaumont, Texas any day.
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    Aug 06, 2008 5:40 AM GMT
    Just to put a period on the other posts, many of which offered support for the almost painfully obvious fact that there is good and bad everywhere -- I agree with this completely.

    But I'll also add that I think there's a tendency lately on RJ to offer up thread topics that focus on negatives (e.g. "that annoying guy at the gym," "What do you hate about your town," "Guys without headshots on RJ: annoying or stupid?" "What bugs you about your job," "Why are New Yorkers so rude compared to Texans?", etc.) and on and on and on about dislike and hatred and negativity. Blech.

    Note that my post itself is now negative too, which is often a symptom of negative threads. But now that I'm here in negative land anyway, I'll take the next step and be a bit provocative and kinda rude:

    As someone who's lived in a dozen or more places, and who has spent years traveling abroad, my personal opinion is that someone's view of another place or another people or another culture says WAY more about themselves than it does about the place, people, or culture they are talking about.

    In short: people come to places with prejudices. These prejudices color their interpretation of events, and thus their experiences are often a self-fulfilling prophecy. There's a name for this behavior in psychology, but I'm not a psychologist, so I'm hoping one will post (EDIT: it's called Confirmation Bias)

    While I've lived in Manhattan (during 9/11, in fact, where the entire city became one incredible connected supportive loving family for a week or two -- an experience that I still hold as a touchstone of civilization at its finest), I'll give a non-NYC example: one from my current home town of SF.

    The prejudiced opinion of many visitors to SF is the following:

    * Kinda kooky, in a harmless, silly lefty way
    * Lotsa gays
    * Pretty Victorians nestled in picturesque hills
    * Sunny blue skies with fluffy clouds
    * Great food and cafes with a European style of life (i.e. urban, walkable, historical, colorful)
    * A great vacation destination

    This prejudiced view is largely positive, thank goodness, cause everyone seems to just LOVE their time here in SF while visiting. I know everyone wants to visit me, now that I live here, and they all LOVE it here.

    Strange thing is: the reality of SF is a bit of that stuff above, but its also

    * Fucking freezing and foggy and damp and drizzly here most of the year (we wear coats pretty much year round)
    * Dirty and unkempt
    * Filled with homeless and panhandlers
    * Home of laughably inept and incompetent government and city services
    * Actually quite deadly serious about most things that non-SF people think are kooky

    But yet, people love to visit here: by the planeload, busload, and trainload. And they keep coming back, cause they LOVE SF!!! They seem to be able to ignore all the things that we who live here see. Which is wonderful for them, actually -- and us too, since we make so much money off the touristas (just selling them goofy Alcatraz-themed sweat shirts and hoodies for when they freeze their asses off dressed in shorts and t-shirts brings in untold MILLIONS).

    In the case of NYC, or Mumbai, or Mexico City, there are plenty of negative prejudices, a small chunk of which are true (but often no more true than any other place), and, surprisingly, visitors to those places often have experiences that are colored by those prejudices. Go figure.

    For the record, I've spent a lot of time in Texas, altho I've never lived there, and I think it's great -- even including Houston ;) And just like I don't blame people from Wyoming for Dick Cheney, I think it's a bit whacked to blame Texans for George Bush, who, in fact, is a transplanted Easterner. Nor do I think Texans all tote guns, drive pickups, drink a 6-pack of beer a day, or feel that their state is actually its own country, and therefore not subject to Federal jurisdiction in any way. Those would be prejudices, and therefore I don't let them get in my way of really enjoying the True Texas, which is a tiny bit of all those things, but, in reality, it's also a whole heckofalot more, including, even... people who love New Yorkers cause they are so friendly.

    Long-windedly and patronizingly yours,

    K

    PS Professor JPrichVa has offered one of the better explanations of NYC culture I've seen in a while. *doffs hat*
  • MuslDrew

    Posts: 463

    Aug 06, 2008 5:42 AM GMT
    I've always had a blast when I go to NYC. I don't like uptown at all, which seems to be the busy, very important, rushed neighborhood. but i love running around downtown. The shopkeepers are very friendly, even when you don't spend any money. If you eat where the locals eat the food is great, service is good and prices are surprisingly moderate. It was explained to me that there is so much competition that they all have to be good and priced carefully to stay in business. I love the gyms there. Nice variety of bars/clubs/lounges. I don't particularly enjoy driving so the subway and taxis are ideal for me.And last but not least, the men! If I could spend winters elsewhere I'd like to try living there.
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    Aug 06, 2008 5:51 AM GMT
    MuslDrew saidI've always had a blast when I go to NYC. I don't like uptown at all, which seems to be the busy, very important, rushed neighborhood. but i love running around downtown. The shopkeepers are very friendly, even when you don't spend any money. If you eat where the locals eat the food is great, service is good and prices are surprisingly moderate. It was explained to me that there is so much competition that they all have to be good and priced carefully to stay in business. I love the gyms there. Nice variety of bars/clubs/lounges. I don't particularly enjoy driving so the subway and taxis are ideal for me.And last but not least, the men! If I could spend winters elsewhere I'd like to try living there.


    icon_biggrin.gif aww that's cute, What do you wear when you go runnig, so i an go spot you one day hehe ;p

    you mean Midtown is busy icon_biggrin.gif, uptown is well.. harlem, washington heights, and inwood for the most part icon_biggrin.gif
  • groundcombat

    Posts: 945

    Aug 06, 2008 6:02 AM GMT
    BigSETXjock saidThere are a huge number of guys on here who live in New York. Many of them seem to have no concept that there is more to this country and more to the World than just that one city. I could very be wrong, but all the guys from NY seem to have an arrogance about them.

    .....

    So New Yorkers... Tell this Texan what makes NY a better place than Texas with its wide-open spaces, tight Wranglers, outstanding economy, and dirt cheap housing prices?


    That's wierd..I always seemed to notice that sense of "no place is beeter" arrogrance from Texans....strange.
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    Aug 06, 2008 6:02 AM GMT
    being born and raised in the midwest, then spending 4 years in new york for school, i tend to agree with the original claim that new yorkers believe that they are the center of the universe, and that everything revolves around them.

    i don't have a hatred of or anger towards new yorkers, it's just something that i noticed over years of interaction with them. some of my closest friends in the world are new yorkers, but they still do have that arrogance. however, it's not enough for me to write off the city or its people.

    i absolutely loved my time in new york. it would be nice to live there again one day. but i'm much happier where i am now.
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    Aug 06, 2008 6:04 AM GMT
    New York is awesome. I've lived in many cities and there's just nothing like the spirit and energy of New York. It's not even my favorite city but it truly is the only one of its kind. Can't wait to go there later this month.
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    Aug 06, 2008 6:05 AM GMT
    Of course New York isn't the center of the universe. LA is. Duh. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 06, 2008 6:21 AM GMT
    I once read: the only people to truly love NYC, are the ones whom have the choice to leave, and the rest wish they could.

    New Yorkers always stand out in Oz, over all the rest of Americans. Because they are load, and rude.

    Not long ago, one was in line at an American fast food out let, yes One eats cheaply, and poorly sometimes, when in a hurry.

    Then I hear an American being very load and rude, almost screaming out. OMG we don't have to wait this long in New York.

    As for Texas they have a sweet little town named after me called Pattison. So it cant be all that bad!

    Also there is a national park in WI way up north, that has WI highest water fall in a Nat. Park called Pattison. So not only does Ones family have a long history in Oz, it also does in the US of A.

    In fact both sides of my family tree do. So guys for all you know. One could be on your family tree.
  • ROYCE13

    Posts: 315

    Aug 06, 2008 6:27 AM GMT

    I am a Texan, native Californian, lived Austin, Houston, Dallas and currently San Antonio and a few other places. Texans are friendly for the most part on the surface, but do not always go the extra mile. I live i New York 2 times a year for about 3-4 weeks, sometimes in a hotel and usually in an apartment. I love NY. People may appear rude, but an educated, cultured, travelled person or a person with a bit of insight would not compare a 10 million population city like NYC with anything other than an equal. You must be there a bit, or know what it is you want to do while you are there, or you do not get the best experience.

    NY ers are very friendly, from my 30 year experience there, they may not be as "Hi Y'all" friendly as in the south, but when you need anything or are in need of help they come thru. Every year there are silly random tests done by TV stations all over US and NY usually comes in 1st or top in friendly and honest tests.

    I work and live in Paris each year as well and the same complaints are waged against Parisians. Again, since I am there for 30-45 days, my experience is different. I learned the language as well and always have a pleasant experience, but they can be trying I will give you that.

    Since I travel and work all over, I try not to compare and complain, why bother, I enjoy each city for its differences, good and bad. Parisians do think Paris is the best city in the world, I agree 95%, NY ers do think NYC is the center of the world though, but it has been to an extent all these years so to speak. Texans do think that Texas is its own country and I agree there to, we are a damn great state.

    And I do love Chicago as well, cleaner and less expensive and less crowded than NY, but also a bit less vibe and such, no offense ok.

    Moral of the story, each place is great and horrible thru different eyes and experiences and exposures. But, compare apples to apples not to canyons(oranges). stretch the mind a bit guys.
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    Aug 06, 2008 6:31 AM GMT
    I have not been to NYC for years now but never had a problem with it? Yes people are busy to and fro' to work etc but every big city is the same!

    A couple of times the rudeness appeared and I just answered "Oh sorry you don't speak real english" and moved on!

    Texas I did not like boring by far!


    SFO yes it was dirty and cold in July!


    LA hated it!

    Chicago would love to go!


    Arizona I loved so much and felt I was home for strange reason!

    FLA Too sticky but loved sth beach and all those Latino's
    Caramba!!!!!!!!!!!
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    Aug 06, 2008 6:35 AM GMT
    ROYCE13 said
    I am a Texan, native Californian, lived Austin, Houston, Dallas and currently San Antonio and a few other places. Texans are friendly for the most part on the surface, but do not always go the extra mile. I live i New York 2 times a year for about 3-4 weeks, sometimes in a hotel and usually in an apartment. I love NY. People may appear rude, but an educated, cultured, travelled person or a person with a bit of insight would not compare a 10 million population city like NYC with anything other than an equal. You must be there a bit, or know what it is you want to do while you are there, or you do not get the best experience.

    NY ers are very friendly, from my 30 year experience there, they may not be as "Hi Y'all" friendly as in the south, but when you need anything or are in need of help they come thru. Every year there are silly random tests done by TV stations all over US and NY usually comes in 1st or top in friendly and honest tests.

    I work and live in Paris each year as well and the same complaints are waged against Parisians. Again, since I am there for 30-45 days, my experience is different. I learned the language as well and always have a pleasant experience, but they can be trying I will give you that.

    Since I travel and work all over, I try not to compare and complain, why bother, I enjoy each city for its differences, good and bad. Parisians do think Paris is the best city in the world, I agree 95%, NY ers do think NYC is the center of the world though, but it has been to an extent all these years so to speak. Texans do think that Texas is its own country and I agree there to, we are a damn great state.

    And I do love Chicago as well, cleaner and less expensive and less crowded than NY, but also a bit less vibe and such, no offense ok.

    Moral of the story, each place is great and horrible thru different eyes and experiences and exposures. But, compare apples to apples not to canyons(oranges). stretch the mind a bit guys.


    Some truly good points.

    Yes and Melbourne Australia, is one of the worlds most livable cities, just stay away from the western and Northern suburbs; yuk!
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Aug 06, 2008 6:38 AM GMT

    I loved living in NYC...living there and visiting there are VERY different...it took me a good 6 months to acclimate to the environment from the midwest...

    Once I "became a New Yorker" I felt proud of sharing the history that city has...the people who have walked down those streets...NYC doesn't "make" people...it "makes them stonger"...

    All in all, it's quite a conservative city...but I always knew were people stood...upfront...there was no "guessing games"...I got raw unadulterated truth...which isn't for everyone...I learned what friends were and what acquaintances were...and never to mix up the two...

    I knew I wasn't going to settle in NYC forever...I was saving that for San Francisco...but I truly am glad for the experience...

    - David