Multiple Personality Disorder

  • urhereurthere

    Posts: 185

    Jul 13, 2012 12:40 AM GMT
    We all know what MPD is, but i never met someone that suffered from that condition... how do you think it would affect your lives? i mean, if you had this problem, do you think it would change your life or not? have you ever thought you might develop alter egos?

    this may be a dumb topic but it felt kinda interesting
  • araphael

    Posts: 1148

    Jul 13, 2012 7:19 AM GMT
    Having completed a residency in a psychiatric hospital many years ago, I can tell you from experience that this particular disorder, not to be confused with schzephrenic disorder, is manageable actually. The root of 'multiple personality disorder" as it is commonly called, is often psychological instead of physiological which means there is hope of cure beyond pharmacology. But before you quickly classify yourself as this, take a little time. Often if the painful experiences from yonger years are dealt with effectively through counseling, you can avoid the necessity of drugs. But do not rule out the benefits of drug therapy. Just my ignorant opinion on your question. Good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 13, 2012 7:24 AM GMT
    I have that, Im a different person entirely depending on whom Im talking to.. Im different person to my mom, to my grandparents, to my friends, to the girls, to my bro's, to my teachers, will be to my kids and wife too.. hell, I completely change my personality depending on what country I'm in and whatever is appropriate to that culture... Im just a chameleon like that
  • urhereurthere

    Posts: 185

    Jul 14, 2012 2:39 AM GMT
    GreenHopper
    Im not quite sure that applies here... Im talking becoming a completely different personality, having a different taste and common sence. like having another person living inside your self...

    Araphael
    does what GreenHopper says apply here? and does someone that never actually "changed" per say know they have it or does this disorder just appear out of the blue?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2012 2:47 AM GMT
    I believe this is now called Dissociative Identity Disorder. Shirley Mason aka "Sybil" is the most famous case having a personality that split into 16 different people due to extreme childhood abuse. They made a movie about it in the 70s starring Sally Field.

    I did read later on that they believe her whole case was a complete fraud, but I cannot be sure. Its definitely a very interesting disorder.
  • rf_dal

    Posts: 380

    Jul 14, 2012 3:01 AM GMT
    JackBlair69 saidIt was long-running hoax, only recently exposed and debunked.


    Whoa really? That's crazy, no pun intended
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2012 3:07 AM GMT
    lennyvalen saidGreenHopper
    Im not quite sure that applies here... Im talking becoming a completely different personality, having a different taste and common sence. like having another person living inside your self...


    Haha yes I was half joking.. the fact of the matter is that we all have different personalities, just look at the changes we all go through in life! What I think would make it pathological is when we "deny" those aspects of ourself and then make them into completely different identities that forget about each other to a degree..

    I mean lets say for instance you say to yourself

    "wow, that is well done, congrats to you (insert own name)"

    "Omg, you fucked up, dont be so stupid next time"

    or when years later you think of something you did a long time ago and you say

    "o wow, Ive changed haha, I would do that differently now"

    we are always constantly "talking" to ourselves... even our brains are split into two different sides, that really respond differently to different situations... we have our different moods in which we react very differently to the same situation,

    So i think, in a nutshell, MPD is simply when we push away (go into denial) about aspects of ourselves, certain memories of ourselves, and create different "persona's" for it... in order to complete the denial, your day-to-day persona completely pushes those things out of awareness, and then they may surface in another personality

    Just a theory though
  • urhereurthere

    Posts: 185

    Jul 14, 2012 3:08 AM GMT
    does it appear out of the blue or can people feel it coming or having a symptom?
  • urhereurthere

    Posts: 185

    Jul 14, 2012 3:10 AM GMT
    JackBlair69 saidIt was long-running hoax, only recently exposed and debunked.


    are you for real?
  • spacemagic

    Posts: 520

    Jul 14, 2012 3:16 AM GMT
    A diagnosis of Multiple Personality Disorder requires not only distinct personalities, but ones that take control of a person's thoughts and actions, accompanied by memory loss. Just sayin'.
  • urhereurthere

    Posts: 185

    Jul 14, 2012 3:19 AM GMT
    obscurereference saidA diagnosis of Multiple Personality Disorder requires not only distinct personalities, but ones that take control of a person's thoughts and actions, accompanied by memory loss. Just sayin'.


    yeah thats right but is it true? does that really happen?

    and about symptoms? if i had that disorder would i have any feeling or something about it? its psychological so i dont think any physical symptom would appear rigth?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2012 3:24 AM GMT
    lennyvalen said
    obscurereference saidA diagnosis of Multiple Personality Disorder requires not only distinct personalities, but ones that take control of a person's thoughts and actions, accompanied by memory loss. Just sayin'.


    yeah thats right but is it true? does that really happen?

    and about symptoms? if i had that disorder would i have any feeling or something about it? its psychological so i dont think any physical symptom would appear rigth?


    Many have said it was indeed a hoax... that people who suffered from it were simply acting
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2012 3:25 AM GMT
    Yep...no longer referred to as multiple personalities disorder.

    It will not be in the DSM V
  • spacemagic

    Posts: 520

    Jul 14, 2012 3:30 AM GMT
    Yeah, it really happens. As far as MPD or DID, it's all a mental experience. No physical symptoms really. Different personalities taking over at different times, with that "alter" having different traits than the actual person... different name,different accent, different lingo, different age, or maybe different gender. Along with lapses in memory, especially about personal identifying information or history. It can be observable by other people.

    It's completely different from just acting different in front of different people. People like that are social chameleons, or just have strict internal rules about different sets of conduct around particular people. I might act wholesome and good around my grandma, but I'll get wasted with my brother. I'm a courteous and thoughtful professional, but when it's just me and my coworkers, I cuss like a sailor and make lewd jokes. That's not multiple personality disorder. It's the same personality, just exhibiting some traits at some times, and other traits at others.
  • urhereurthere

    Posts: 185

    Jul 14, 2012 12:59 PM GMT
    Doesnt it scare you that you (any of you) could get that disorDer?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2012 3:40 PM GMT
    Just goes to show that you can't judge a thread by its title.

    I thought this was going to be a discussion about how posters claim to be delightful in person yet exhibit rudely online. Or maybe even how someone would never be nasty to their waiter but think nothing of, rather relish in, treating a fellow poster like a piece of crap.

    :::sneezes:::::mumbles:::::bullshit::::::

    My mistake.

    Given my explorations into consciousness, I'd tend towards the Sociocognitive Model of DID**

    **http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_identity_disorder
    "Skeptics believe that a small subset of doctors are responsible for diagnosing the majority of individuals with DID. Psychologist N. Spanos and others skeptical of the condition have suggested that in addition to iatrogenesis***, DID may be the result of role-playing rather than separate personalities"

    What it is about my experiences with altered states of consciousness, particularly with my experiences in dream yoga, is that no matter whether I experience myself with my body awake, in all the many moods of that, or whether I experience myself in a nonlucid dream where I can always recognize which dream character was mine--even if it did not behave as I'd prefer--or whether I experience myself in a lucid dream when obviously I know myself, or whether I experience myself in other states of consciousness variously deprived of the awareness of the body, whether I have had a few too many drinks or whether I am sober, thoughtfully exploring numerous aspects of consciousness unconstrained by sensory input in dream yogic states, that even when there is no outside world, no inside dream, nothing but experiencing the self as its thoughts, there is not a hint of the nonrecognition of the self. About the self, there is only continuum.

    You can remove all about us that we might think holds us together, our careers, are physical abilities, our bodies, our dreams, our families, our friends, our experiences, and you can put what remains into a black box where nothing exists but your own conscious mind and you will still be 100% you.

    For those who think they'd have a problem with that, consider therapy.

    ***http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iatrogenesis
    " brought forth by a healer"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2012 4:05 PM GMT
    obscurereference saidYeah, it really happens. As far as MPD or DID, it's all a mental experience. No physical symptoms really. Different personalities taking over at different times, with that "alter" having different traits than the actual person... different name,different accent, different lingo, different age, or maybe different gender. Along with lapses in memory, especially about personal identifying information or history. It can be observable by other people.

    It's completely different from just acting different in front of different people. People like that are social chameleons, or just have strict internal rules about different sets of conduct around particular people. I might act wholesome and good around my grandma, but I'll get wasted with my brother. I'm a courteous and thoughtful professional, but when it's just me and my coworkers, I cuss like a sailor and make lewd jokes. That's not multiple personality disorder. It's the same personality, just exhibiting some traits at some times, and other traits at others.


    (ignoring the "it's not real" posts because I'm not convinced this is a widely held belief by most mental health professionals)

    the memory blocks are pretty key. the dissociation occurs generally really young in response to some sort of horrible (really really bad) trauma like sexual or physical abuse, a sort of means of escape for the child that carries through to adulthood. it's a very rare disorder but sometimes people have it and do not even realize it for years because their only symptom is a occasional memory lapse (which occurs when an "alter" takes over and the dominant personality steps back).

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2012 4:21 PM GMT
    homastj said

    (ignoring the "it's not real" posts because I'm not convinced this is a widely held belief by most mental health professionals)

    the memory blocks are pretty key. the dissociation occurs generally really young in response to some sort of horrible (really really bad) trauma like sexual or physical abuse, a sort of means of escape for the child that carries through to adulthood. it's a very rare disorder but sometimes people have it and do not even realize it for years because their only symptom is a occasional memory lapse (which occurs when an "alter" takes over and the dominant personality steps back).



    Perhaps it is a sub-disorder of PTSD.
  • Ethan_1990

    Posts: 34

    Jul 14, 2012 4:23 PM GMT
    It's actually called Disassociative Identity Disorder now.
  • urhereurthere

    Posts: 185

    Jul 15, 2012 3:16 AM GMT
    ok its DID now. i started the thread with that name, didnt no better, slag off.
    i just started this thread out of curiosity and because i find it pretty interesting psychologically.

    imagine you did have alter egos that would jump in in your life unexpected :S
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 15, 2012 3:30 AM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    homastj said

    (ignoring the "it's not real" posts because I'm not convinced this is a widely held belief by most mental health professionals)

    the memory blocks are pretty key. the dissociation occurs generally really young in response to some sort of horrible (really really bad) trauma like sexual or physical abuse, a sort of means of escape for the child that carries through to adulthood. it's a very rare disorder but sometimes people have it and do not even realize it for years because their only symptom is a occasional memory lapse (which occurs when an "alter" takes over and the dominant personality steps back).



    Perhaps it is a sub-disorder of PTSD.


    could make sense. I was getting the impression others thought it was all "made up" which seems asinine to me. claims made by DID patients and their therapists can be really outlandish and bizarre (read some memoirs from DID patients sometime - weird shit) but it just seems to be a really strange disorder
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 15, 2012 7:52 PM GMT
    At layman's level, I've been reading up a little on DID since this thread. Found this while searching for some physical manifestation that would make sense to me...

    http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?Volume=163&page=630&journalID=13

    ...making me less skeptical about it. I guess it isn't hard to imagine amnesia, considering who even remembers what they had for lunch a week ago Thursday. What I still find so very hard to relate to is that even though I don't remember lunch, I still remember me, so some skepticism remains.

    " Hippocampal and Amygdalar Volumes in Dissociative Identity Disorder

    Smaller hippocampal volume has been reported in several stress-related psychiatric disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), borderline personality disorder with early abuse, and depression with early abuse. Patients with borderline personality disorder and early abuse have also been found to have smaller amygdalar volume. The authors examined hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in patients with dissociative identity disorder, a disorder that has been associated with a history of severe childhood trauma. Method: The authors used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala in 15 female patients with dissociative identity disorder and 23 female subjects without dissociative identity disorder or any other psychiatric disorder. The volumetric measurements for the two groups were compared. Results: Hippocampal volume was 19.2% smaller and amygdalar volume was 31.6% smaller in the patients with dissociative identity disorder, compared to the healthy subjects. The ratio of hippocampal volume to amygdalar volume was significantly different between groups. Conclusions: The findings are consistent with the presence of smaller hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in patients with dissociative identity disorder, compared with healthy subjects.
    "


    I would like to see a brain scan to see if it shows that memories are indeed unretrieved when a person is supposedly exeriences DID. But the article notes that

    "Apart from single case reports, published brain imaging studies of dissociative disorders are few. In one study, patients with depersonalization disorder had higher activity in somatosensory association areas (40). In another study, functional MRI was used to examine brain activation in PTSD patients in a dissociative state while reexperiencing traumatic memories; greater activation was found in the temporal, inferior, and medial frontal regions and in occipital, parietal, anterior cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortical regions "

    That's all from 2006 though. Perhaps more work has been done since then.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 15, 2012 8:05 PM GMT
    MPD/DID is the end product of a war in psychiatry and psychology. Precisely for the reason our psychiatry resident highlighted -- it is considered primarily a psychological disorder and immune to treatment with drugs.

    It is part of a larger group of disorders called dissociative disorders that get little or no attention from most clinicians.

    This is an argument that goes back pretty far when dissociation was considered to be part of "hysteria" which psychiatry has also fought to separate itself from.

    I think to say it was a hoax or that it does not exist is very short sighted. Clearly, there are well documented cases of dissociative identity disorder and many victims of trauma experience dissociation. They are not told how to feel and have these experiences before they seek therapy.

    In some sense, all psychiatric and psychological diseases are cultural. In Western culture, Schizophrenia is regarded as an organic brain disease. In other cultures they are seen as gifted, "two-spirited" and shamans.

    I have met people who suffer from DID, though they are increasingly rare as time goes on. I think the phenomena behind DID is still very much present but we do not label it as such anymore and finding someone with that diagnosis is difficult.

    DIDI on the other hand, often causes significant impairment in the way someone can function. They are unaware of their other personalities (usually called "alters") and it is particularly bad during times of stress. A large percentage of people with DID have child abuse histories. It makes sense to me then that during a critical period of personality formation that traumatic abuse would cause splitting that could become severe enough to cause something like DID. GreenHopper mentioned that he uses splitting when interacting with different people and for the most part that is normal and we all do it. Splitting is very common in children during their personality formation as they establish who they "are."