Calming muscle twitching after working out

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 14, 2012 3:38 PM GMT
    Do you guys have ways to calm the muscle twitching you feel at night in bed? (not THAT muscle, you bunch of horndogs!) I thinking mostly in the legs after running.

    Sometimes when I am trying to go sleep, I can feel like the fibers of my leg muscles twitching. I can be annoying. I am wondering if you guys do anything to calm that feeling.
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    Jul 14, 2012 4:40 PM GMT
    MY calfs twitch too after each workout. I blame it on age related bad venous system.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jul 14, 2012 4:42 PM GMT
    eat a banana before you workout- your lacking potassiumicon_idea.gif
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    Jul 14, 2012 4:45 PM GMT
    Like restless leg syndrome? I have that
  • TroyAthlete

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    Jul 14, 2012 4:53 PM GMT
    pf008 saidLike restless leg syndrome? I have that


    No, it's just a muscle spasm from inflammation, microtears during a workout.

    Stretch, ice, water, and some potassium (a banana) ought to do the trick.
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    Jul 14, 2012 4:55 PM GMT
    I think I know what you mean. My biceps have done it, locked up
    Too. I drink too much coffee and not enough water is my problem
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    Jul 14, 2012 7:21 PM GMT
    I've never experienced a muscle twitch. Either I'm doing something right or not working hard enough.

    * EDIT * Maybe it's because bananas are my go-to snack food.
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    Jul 14, 2012 7:29 PM GMT
    TroyAthlete said
    pf008 saidLike restless leg syndrome? I have that


    No, it's just a muscle spasm from inflammation, microtears during a workout.

    Stretch, ice, water, and some potassium (a banana) ought to do the trick.


    Excellent advice.
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    Jul 14, 2012 7:31 PM GMT
    A good fucking usually helps with any twitching I have.
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    Jul 14, 2012 9:50 PM GMT
    Sex and bourbon, in not particular order, usually does the trick.
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    Jul 14, 2012 10:03 PM GMT
    mplsmike saidSex and bourbon, in not particular order, usually does the trick.


    Hello stranger!!! icon_wink.gif
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    Jul 14, 2012 10:43 PM GMT
    A glass of milk has the same potassium as a banana--most fruits and vegetables have high potassium.

    Probably electrolyte disturbances (salt, water) and/or inadequate carbohydrate repletion post workout. Are you eating immediately after working out?
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    Jul 15, 2012 12:51 AM GMT
    I had the same problem after cycling workouts. A glass of milk a couple of hours after riding fixed the problem.
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    Jul 15, 2012 12:58 AM GMT
    Hmmmmm...the glass of milk or maybe a cup of yogurt sounds like good advice. I just ran this evening for 600 calories and my leg muscles are twitching right now. I just ate a banana. Let me have a glass of milk and see what happens.

    Thanks everybody for replying. I appreciate all the suggestions, advice, and hearing your experiences.
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    Jul 15, 2012 1:07 AM GMT
    I get this all the time (upper back, shoulders, forearms, glutes, etc). Doc checked all sorts of things, including potassium levels, nervous system, etc, and couldn't find any explanation for it other than... "It's probably just a side effect of your muscle mass and workouts." Very helpful.... icon_rolleyes.gif

    Any suggestions other than stretching and bananas? LOL.
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    Jul 15, 2012 1:19 AM GMT
    rbdude79 saidI get this all the time (upper back, shoulders, forearms, glutes, etc). Doc checked all sorts of things, including potassium levels, nervous system, etc, and couldn't find any explanation for it other than... "It's probably just a side effect of your muscle mass and workouts." Very helpful.... icon_rolleyes.gif

    Any suggestions other than stretching and bananas? LOL.


    Not really, without hearing an individual detailed history--could also be overtraining and/or under-recovery. Keep your blood sugar steady by eating every few hours (that's the main reason for the small frequent meals is because it controls insulin/glucose spikes). If your diet lacks in carbohydrate, your muscles won't be able to recover glycogen stores as fast.

  • mybud

    Posts: 11836

    Jul 15, 2012 2:08 AM GMT
    Stay hydrated......
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    Jul 15, 2012 2:31 AM GMT
    I chowed down on a couple of bananas and couple of glasses of milk. The twitching sensations have really subsided a lot.

    THANKS!

    I'll have some yogurt before bed.

    I usually have had oatmeal before bed. I guess there wasnt enough milk on just a bowl of cereal.
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    Jul 15, 2012 3:15 AM GMT
    So potassium is always the go-to solution people first think of. However as pointed out above, spasms can be caused by any electrolyte imbalance. The physiologically important electrolytes are:

    Sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), chloride (Cl−), hydrogen phosphate (HPO42−), and hydrogen carbonate (HCO3−)

    Sodium, potassium and calcium are the electrolytes primarily associated with muscle contraction. While potassium is important, you could just as easily be getting too little calcium or too little salt.

    While many people still associate salt with high blood pressure, that is actually an issue of deep contention since there is no real proof of this assertion. And so many people actually have insufficient dietary salt.
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    Jul 15, 2012 3:38 AM GMT
    principal0 saidSo potassium is always the go-to solution people first think of. However as pointed out above, spasms can be caused by any electrolyte imbalance. The physiologically important electrolytes are:

    Sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), chloride (Cl−), hydrogen phosphate (HPO42−), and hydrogen carbonate (HCO3−)

    Sodium, potassium and calcium are the electrolytes primarily associated with muscle contraction. While potassium is important, you could just as easily be getting too little calcium or too little salt.

    While many people still associate salt with high blood pressure, that is actually an issue of deep contention since there is no real proof of this assertion. And so many people actually have insufficient dietary salt.


    Yes there are other electrolytes, but because sodium nearly always comes with chloride in real food, no one mentions chloride. This is why I suggested milk--it has more electrolytes (sodium, calcium, and potassium, namely) than an electrolyte drink while also supplying protein and carbohydrate. Magnesium can be obtained by having a handful of nuts everyday.

    I disagree about salt and high blood pressure. Water follows salt, and since sodium is the extracellular ion, having excess sodium in the diet would mean extracellular volume increases, and therefore, more pressure on artery walls. In America, people who have poor diet choices often consume many processed foods, which are high in sodium, therefore constantly creating this situation of increased blood pressure that from an etiology standpoint is transient and easily rectified by sweating, kidney filtration and urination, and reducing sodium--but because people are loath to make dietary changes that have such effects, they chronically have high blood pressure.

    In order of magnitude of blood pressure reduction, however, sodium is the last (least effective) on the list. Increasing potassium intake (fruits, veggies, milk) reduces blood pressure more than sodium reduction alone. What works even better than those is aerobic exercise in the range of 40-70% VO2max, which lay people call the 'fat burn' zone (not the cardio zone). Additionally, relaxation therapies work better than any dietary change at managing blood pressure similar to the aerobic exercise reduction. Last, what will effect the LARGEST blood pressure reduction in the body is weight loss. If you are overweight, losing weight will have the largest blood pressure reductions.
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    Jul 15, 2012 4:05 AM GMT
    magnesium_calm.jpg

    this works so well!