Suffering from a TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) and in need of serious advice.

  • southerngent8

    Posts: 12

    Jul 16, 2012 4:29 AM GMT
    Hey guys.
    I'm fairly new to this site, and haven't posted much on here. But I am in need of advice and I feel like this is a good place to turn to. I really hope maybe you guys can help me out. I know this is going to be an extremely long post but I don't know how else to explain myself other than giving you the whole story.
    When I was 16, On February 10th 2008, I was involved in a head on collision while on my way to church. I was driving a Ford Ranger travelling alone. It was a beautiful morning outside. I had stayed at my sister's house the night before and did not wake up as early as I normally would on a Sunday, so I was running late. Church started at 11am. It was about 10:45am when I left my sister's house headed to church. The church was at least 20 minutes away, and that was without any traffic. I was in a complete rush because I didn't want to be late to church. At around 10:50, 5 minutes after I had left, I was travelling down a curvy road going around 55 mph when the posted speed limit was 45. Around that same time there was a family of 4 (The mother was driving, the father was in the passenger seat, and their two children where in the back seat) travelling towards me in an Audi A6 sedan also on their way to church. They were running late as well. I came around a curve and as I did I looked away for a split second and my right tires ran off the road. In a panick I overcorrected and jerked the wheel trying to get back onto the road. When I did this I went head-on into the Audi. We hit on the drivers side of the front of our automobiles. The Audi came to a stop but the Ford Ranger I was in flipped onto the passenger side and slid down the road before coming to a stop on its side. I was knocked unconcious for maybe a minute or so. I knew right away that my right leg was broken, and I thought my left one was broken also. My back was hurting, and I had blood coming from the left side of my forehead, right above my eye. I was rushed to the hospital in an ambulance. The family that was in the Audi where all fine except for the mother who was driving. She was flown in a helicopter to a hospital here in atlanta with a broken neck, broken legs, and other injuries. She was in critical condition and was not expected to live. (She ended up making a full recovery thankfully)

    When I got to the hospital I told the doctors that my back hurt, both of my feet/ankles hurt, and my right leg was in severe pain. The blood coming from my forehead was from an inch long gash right where my eyebrow was. They ran multiple tests and determined that the my right leg/foot/ankle was broken in 7 different places. My foot was basically crushed. However, as for my back and my left foot, the doctor said there was nothing wrong. And that cut on my forehead would be fixed with stitches and not need anything else done to it. The doctor said that he wanted to try to "set" the broken bones in my right leg together so that he would not have to do any surgery. This was done and they put me in a wheelchair and sent me home with painkillers. As we were getting in the car to leave the hospital the nurse instructed me to stand on my left foot and get myself into the car. I tried this but could not do it because of the extreme pain. I couldn't even stand on my foot without crying out in pain but she ignored this and helped me into the car. I knew that something was definitely not right. If there was not anything wrong with my left foot then why was I having so much pain? Two days later we decided to go to a resurgens group who specialized in feet/legs to get a second opinion. X-rays where done and the doctor was amazed at what he saw. It turned out that both of my feet where crushed, not only my right foot. And the right foot that was supposed to heal on its own without surgery was a complete mess. I had bone literally breaking through the skin in my leg. The doctor said that he would have to do surgery for sure, and even with surgery he was not sure that I would ever walk again. There was just too much damage done. So two weeks later after some of the swelling was done I went in for surgery on my legs and feet. A 4 hour surgery ended up taking about 7 1/2 hours to complete. The doctor had to put 32 different pieces of metal into my right leg and foot including plates, screws, and pins. I went through another surgery months later, and a lot of physical therapy and was amazingly able to walk. During the days following my accident we also saw my regular doctor who ran multiple tests on me including an xray of my back. We found out that I had two broken vertebrae in my spine and internal injuries as well. None of this was detected when I went to the hospital the day of the accident.

    It has now been over four years since my accident and I am doing ok except for one thing. In April of this year I was diagnosed with a Traumatic Brain Injury from my car accident. In the four years I have been a completely different person personality wise. I suffered from depression, Post traumatic stress disorder, huge mood swings, etc. I had tests done because I thought I might be Bi-Polar but was told that I was not. It is extremely hard for me to learn new things now, and I struggle trying to go to college and pass my classes. My coordination/motor skills have been affected as well. But the main problem I have is with my memory. In march I got a job working at a restaurant in the kitchen as a prep cook, and lasted only a few weeks. I wasn't able to remember hardly anything about the job. This along with other things is what prompted me to see a neurologist. I had an MRI, CT Scan, and an EEG test done and was finally diagnosed with having a TBI. This is the reason that I can't remember anything. It is also the reason for my confusion, coordination, learning problems, etc. The neurologist put me on a medicine called Namenda that is generally used on paitients with Althzeimers to help with memory. But other than that the doctor said there is not much else they can do. He said that if the brain injury would have been detected right when it happened, that they could have done a lot more as far as therapy goes in order to reverse some of the damage. But since it went 4 years being untreated that I am kinda just stuck with it.

    So this is where I need some advice. This brain injury has made a huge impact on my ability to live everyday life. My memory is awful and it really effects my ability to do well in school and to keep a job. I am at a loss right now because I do not know what to do. I have been thinking about possibly taking legal action against the hospital because there was so much that went undiagnosed that day that I had my accident. They knew when I came in there that I had had trauma to my head, but failed to do tests to check for any brain injury. I feel completely helpless right now and I just don't know what quality of life I am going to be able to have living with a TBI. I feel like things could be totally different if the doctors would have done more. So I guess I just need some advice on what to do. Would you guys take legal action? Do I even have a case whatsoever if I tried to take legal action against the hospital? I know I have been scattered and It might be hard to understand all of this but its the best I could do. I hope you guys have some advice to give. I appreciate any and all advice, and I appreciate anyone who took to time to read this monsterously long post lol.

    Thanks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 11:26 AM GMT
    Your best bet is to get a legal consultation from an attorney specializing in medical negligence. Do a google search of any close to your area. The consultation will most probably be free. Good luck bud.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 11:58 AM GMT
    IzzyMuscle saidYour best bet is to get a legal consultation from an attorney specializing in medical negligence. Do a google search of any close to your area. The consultation will most probably be free. Good luck bud.



    Go to Martindale-Hubbard and look for a malpractice attorney who is either "AV" or "BV" rated. Then SUE THE BASTARDS!

    Remember you remain HOT!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 12:13 PM GMT
    See another Doctor
    I went through 3 neurolgists before I found my likeable 3rd

    don't become a victim ( like people are suggesting )
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 12:21 PM GMT
    You seem to have two issues, as I read them. The first is legal action. Definitely pursue it.

    The other is how you recover at least part of your prior ability. Believe it or not, you have at least two things going in your favor. The first is that with your diagnosis, your university now has an obligation to provide you with accommodations and possibly other support structures. Definitely look into your school's office of Student Accessibility Services (or some title similar to that). You'll be working with a group of professionals who are at least twice as dedicated toward insuring that you get a fair shot and can achieve everything that you set your mind to.

    The second thing in your favor is that the brain is malleable, intelligence is malleable. What that means is that human intelligence (or active brain functioning) is determined by neuroplasticity, which is to say that the brain is constantly changing. It used to be believed that once you're born, the number of neural connections you have is a set number and you only lose them. This, it turns out, is not the case. Just as your brain can change as a result of trauma, so too can it develop through work and exercise.

    Neuroplasticity refers to the changes that result from what you do. This process occurs when the brain changes as a response to a specific experience, like tying a tie, riding a bike, speaking a language, etc. When this kind of experience happens, the brain changes. It creates different, newer neurological pathways. People who have suffered extremely traumatic brain injuries--even those who have lost portions of their brain--have been able to recover at least some portion of functionality (and some of them complete recoveries) have described this process as "relearning" to do things.

    On two fronts you have a lot of hope. It will take a lot of work and it will not be easy, but it will be worth it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 12:40 PM GMT
    In Canada we very rarely sue... so i can't give you advice there. However, when i was your age i did have a lot of short term memory issues. Most people with asthma do. A doctor here suggested i take choline a B complex vitamin. It worked great. My advice...I would google alternatives for this and experiment from there. Our bodies are terrific at regenerating themselves under the right conditions. Personally I think you're only going to find 10-20% of the doctors or surgeons that are really good at a particular thing. It's a tough profession and even that may be a high percentage. Good luck with it.

    On another note... for any inflammation.. brain, poison ivy, arthritis, bruising, asthma, insect bites, etc. I suggest you take two limes, squeeze the juice right out of them, it would be about an inch in a glass.... add water to fill up that glass and down it. Limes have one of the more potent bio flavanoid Vitamin C 's especially when it's freshly squeezed. Don't add sugar and don't leave it sitting around, Vitamin C degrades very quickly. In 15 minutes it will start to take the pain, itch and inflammation away. Depending how bad the problem is you may have to take it several times in a day.

    Hope that helps...rob
  • Hammer89

    Posts: 237

    Jul 16, 2012 12:47 PM GMT
    Absolutely take legal action. I would've done it right away but you might have more of a case now than before with all the extra doctors visits because of the brain trauma that was undiagnosed.

    So again yes, nail 'em to the wall.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 12:59 PM GMT
    You shouldn't post on RJ for advice on medical and legal concerns.

    You nearly caused the death of an entire family because you were running late for church? Are you serious? Oh, and the family members were not all fine, as you so eloquently put it. The mother almost died. What's fine about that?

    And you claim the family you hit was running late as well, which tells me that you're not claiming full responsibility for your actions. Is it because they were running late, too, that you hit them? Tell me what made you look away from the road for a "split second" while on a curvy road that most drivers would consider worthy of their full attention. Were you texting, by chance? Were you reading the bible? What were you doing?

    By the way, a god doesn't care if you're late to his/her church. Show up, drop some money in the collection plate, and your god will smile upon you.

    So, it appears you're interested in pursuing legal recourse against the hospital. Never mind the fact that the other family could have taken you to the cleaners. It appears they didn't (praise that god of yours that you didn't lose your shirt). Given the nature of your accident, you'll need damn good lawyers.

    There are term limits for medical malpractice suits - they vary by state. Assuming you have a leg to stand on, so to speak, medical malpractice suits aren't easy to win. Even the legitimate suits often end in settlements that don't get the plaintiffs anywhere near what they're looking for. You won't be retiring early, especially after you've paid the legal team.


    * Edit

    Since you're so eager to worship your god; eager to the point of nearly destroying an entire family, you should ask yourself what He would do in this case. Would your god sue, or turn the other cheek?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 1:15 PM GMT
    Nicely put credo... mistakes do happen and then there is always the poor me syndrome.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 1:19 PM GMT
    GO TO THE DOCTOR.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 1:31 PM GMT
    southerngent8 saidHey guys.
    ......
    When I was 16, On February 10th 2008, I was involved in a head on collision while on my way to church. I was driving a Ford Ranger travelling alone. It was a beautiful morning outside. I had stayed at my sister's house the night before and did not wake up as early as I normally would on a Sunday, so I was running late. Church started at 11am. It was about 10:45am when I left my sister's house headed to church. The church was at least 20 minutes away, and that was without any traffic. I was in a complete rush because I didn't want to be late to church. At around 10:50, 5 minutes after I had left, I was travelling down a curvy road going around 55 mph when the posted speed limit was 45. Around that same time there was a family of 4 (The mother was driving, the father was in the passenger seat, and their two children where in the back seat) travelling towards me in an Audi A6 sedan also on their way to church. .......lol.

    Thanks
    Take your lumps and move on. Had you obeyed the law, you most likely would not be in this predicament. Not a great thing to hear, but.. thats life!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 1:44 PM GMT
    You're story is quite subjective. Learn to be more objective.

    Sorry you had to go through what you did. I work with TBIs a lot (processing disorders). The problem with the brain is that it is one of the least understood circuitry networks. Medicine is practice not science.

    Every detail of your hospital visit is documented, and if it's not... It didn't happen. The first thing you can do is get a copy of all medical records from the hospital. TBI is under codes 851, 852, or 853. Without a diagnostic code no one will take you seriously. Then it's your word against theirs'. Good luck with that.

    Therapy for TBIs is difficult because the problem first has to be diagnosed. Therapy often times involves habituation; It's boring, and you might think how does this even help? Fortunately it does. Frankly I would skip the neurologists and go straight to a diagnostician that can work with cognition problems (speech-language pathologist-they do much more than just speech. IE) working memory vs. short-term memory).

    Remember the brain must first receive a stimulus in order to process it and then execute an action. Disorder in that circuit is where a specific lesion is found.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 1:59 PM GMT
    Neurofeedback is showing strong promise when it comes to treating TBI. Go have a look for a neurofeedback therapist near you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 2:17 PM GMT
    First, get a legal opinion to see if this is too long ago, and if you have grounds for malpractice. Many personal injury attorneys will give you a first consultation for free. Call and find out, then make the appointment. The worst they can say is you're out of luck, but that's not worse than doing nothing at all. But act quickly, as a statutory clock may be ticking in your State, and hospital records may be purged.

    Second, I also suffer from a series of TBIs. (In relating my own case I risk the usual bullies here descending on this thread, and claiming I'm trying to make it about me. But you ask for advice, and I have your condition myself as an example for you). My worst was a motorcycle accident at 19, though I had more head injuries during my subsequent Army career.

    During one injury at 12 I was unconscious for nearly a day in the hospital, and the motorcycle accident even longer. In both cases I not only didn't remember the accident, but for a period of time of several hours prior to the accident (retrograde amnesia). So that when I finally regained consciousness in the hospital I had no idea where I was, or why I was there. Those memories have never returned.

    The accident at age 12 diminished my thinking skills somewhat, demonstrated by academic tests I was taking at the time, particularly entrance exams for very competitive prep schools. The tests taken after the accident all scored lower than those before.

    But the motorcycle accident caused the most dramatic changes. At first I had stroke-like symptoms, my voice a bit impaired, and I couldn't play the piano. My speech returned, but my piano skills never fully did.

    My IQ also took a big hit, as I learned when I took a Wechsler (WAIS) test in college, as part of a psychology course. Another thing I lost was short-term memory like you, though oddly, my long-term memory actually is excellent. Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) was another consequence, getting worse over the years.

    But the biggest problem was epilepsy, which didn't develop until well into my adulthood. The cause of epilepsy often cannot be determined in an individual with certitude, but head trauma is the best candidate in my case, given how often my noggin was knocked, continuing all during my Army years.

    The good news is that while I got epilepsy out of it, my thinking skills continued to improve, a slow recovery like a stroke victim often has. Initially in 1968 I was deeply depressed, not only because of what had happened to me, but as a likely direct result of the brain injury itself. You might want to be evaluated for that.

    My depression & despair were factors in my enlisting in the US Army 8 months later, during Vietnam, and you probably don't wanna do that! Think twice and even 3 times first, when making major decisions, until you feel the emotional fallout from your accident has passed.

    Personality changes are typical with TBI. In fact, this was taught in classes I took for my teacher certification, so students with this condition would be properly recognized and teaching accommodations & allowances made for them.

    Ironically, I myself qualified for such accommodations in college, while I was taking these same teacher courses. One was getting an extra time allocation for any major tests I took, my thought processes being slower than other students. I was evaluated to get a doubled time allowance, meaning a test that other students had 1 hour to finish, I would get 2 hours (though I never used it all). And I could take the test in a private, quiet area by myself with only a proctor, rather than in the classroom with the other students.

    Another accommodation was free tutorial services. But except for Algebra I never used them, instead becoming a volunteer tutor myself in US History and Political Science. I also got priority in my class scheduling, so I wouldn't get back-to-back classes I'd have trouble getting to in the short 10 minutes between periods. You might consider such services for yourself. The campus office that provides them can vary by school, but start with the Dean of Students, where you may need to first establish your medical need with doctor statements.

    Best of luck to you. Don't let yourself get depressed, things will likely improve. I can't address the orthopedic issues, but the neurological situation, based on my own experience, and what I was taught, can definitely get better on its own with time. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 2:25 PM GMT
    I see you live in Georgia. I'm assuming that the accident and hospitalization took place in Georgia? Only a lawyer licensed in Georgia can really give you advice on the legal questions. I am not giving you legal advice.

    I note that if you google you can find some some summaries of the "statutes of limitations" for various types of lawsuits - i.e., the time you have to bring suit. Here's one summary of the Georgia statute of limitations for medical malpractice. I have no idea how accurate it is or how it would apply in your case - again, consult a Georgia attorney.

    Professional Malpractice: Actions for medical malpractice must be commenced within two years of the date the act giving rise to the injury occurred. If a person was unable to discover the injury during that initial two year period of time, the limitations period will be extended. In cases where a health-care provider leaves an object in a person's body, the person has one year from the date of discovery to file suit. However, no medical malpractice action may be brought more than five years after the date that act giving rise to the injury occurred.

    http://www.expertlaw.com/library/limitations_by_state/Georgia.html#3

    Personally, from a purely moral standpoint, I would tend to separate out any culpability for the accident from whether you were properly treated in the hospital. Just because you caused an accident doesn't mean that you're not entitled to proper medical care. I have no idea whether you got proper care, and only a Georgia medical malpractice lawyer (working together with doctor experts) could tell you whether you have a decent malpractice claim.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19133

    Jul 16, 2012 2:30 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidIn relating my own case I risk the usual bullies here descending on this thread, and claiming I'm trying to make it about me.


    Perhaps you should have listed "Extreme Paranoia" as another ongoing symptom of TBI icon_rolleyes.gif No, in all seriousness, I found reading about your brain injuries quite enlightening and interesting. These are the kinds of posts that you are appreciated for here at RJ. Your insight helps others, and you should be commended for this. No reason to tinge your posts with negativity towards others here before it happens.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 3:08 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    Art_Deco saidIn relating my own case I risk the usual bullies here descending on this thread, and claiming I'm trying to make it about me.

    Perhaps you should have listed "Extreme Paranoia" as another ongoing symptom of TBI icon_rolleyes.gif No, in all seriousness, I found reading about your brain injuries quite enlightening and interesting. These are the kinds of posts that you are appreciated for here at RJ. Your insight helps others, and you should be commended for this. No reason to tinge your posts with negativity towards others here before it happens.

    But it does happen here routinely, not "extreme paranoia" at all, and I was hoping to immunize my post against it, and spare the OP the derailment. It appears I failed.

    But I do like to share my experiences if they can be instructive to others. It's better than just talking theory & opinions. During those same teacher courses I mentioned above I developed a slide show about classroom accommodations, based on my own difficulties. It was so well received by my own teacher-ed professor that I was invited to present it to other classes, as well.

    I talked about hearing loss, limited mobility issues, cognitive challenges, and how I had devised ways for me to deal with them, and had made use of existing campus policy for the disabled. So that these future teachers would look for such issues with their own students, especially the young, know how to employ appropriate accommodations within the school environment, and to make their students & families aware of resources & strategies for them to use.

    And strangely enough, those teacher candidates didn't think I was making it all about me, but rather making it all about them, and their future students with special needs. I already had my own strategies, helping me to get straight As, Dean's List every semester, why should I give away my secrets to the competition? Because it's not about me, I lack that selfish gene so common in the gay community that it's assumed we all have it.

    Do I not always say we should share our experiences here, rather than hoard them? Even the OP's request for advice is a kind of sharing, of problems we might have overlooked in ourselves or our friends. And so, yes, I get real unhappy with guys who derail these threads for their own warped agendas, which I think are far more destructive than my "extreme paranoia."
  • southerngent8

    Posts: 12

    Jul 16, 2012 7:05 PM GMT
    credo saidYou shouldn't post on RJ for advice on medical and legal concerns.

    You nearly caused the death of an entire family because you were running late for church? Are you serious? Oh, and the family members were not all fine, as you so eloquently put it. The mother almost died. What's fine about that?

    And you claim the family you hit was running late as well, which tells me that you're not claiming full responsibility for your actions. Is it because they were running late, too, that you hit them? Tell me what made you look away from the road for a "split second" while on a curvy road that most drivers would consider worthy of their full attention. Were you texting, by chance? Were you reading the bible? What were you doing?

    By the way, a god doesn't care if you're late to his/her church. Show up, drop some money in the collection plate, and your god will smile upon you.

    So, it appears you're interested in pursuing legal recourse against the hospital. Never mind the fact that the other family could have taken you to the cleaners. It appears they didn't (praise that god of yours that you didn't lose your shirt). Given the nature of your accident, you'll need damn good lawyers.

    There are term limits for medical malpractice suits - they vary by state. Assuming you have a leg to stand on, so to speak, medical malpractice suits aren't easy to win. Even the legitimate suits often end in settlements that don't get the plaintiffs anywhere near what they're looking for. You won't be retiring early, especially after you've paid the legal team.


    * Edit

    Since you're so eager to worship your god; eager to the point of nearly destroying an entire family, you should ask yourself what He would do in this case. Would your god sue, or turn the other cheek?


    My God believes in forgiveness. He is a forgiving god. We all make mistakes and fall short sometimes. I do take full responsibility for my actions. I am fully aware that by a dumb mistake that I made I put the lives of others at risk, and in doing so almost caused a mother to lose her life. I am completely aware that I was at fault for the accident. I told the police in the police report that I was the one who caused the accident. I told them that I was speeding. I was honest from the get-go. This isn't a matter of whose fault was the accident though. Yes, I am interested in taking legal action against the hospital. Are you saying that it is acceptable for so many things to go undaignosed just because I was the one who caused the accident? The reason I haven't thought about a lawsuit before this point in time is because I have been on the other side of a lawsuit before. The family did take legal action against me and they won their case. I never tried to place the blame on anyone else. And I don't expect to get a huge paycheck if I decide to take further action. It's not about the money whatsoever. I just want somebody to be held responsible for not diagnosing the injuries that I got. I do not feel as though I got the care that I should have, and because of that I am having a hard time trying to live a normal life.
  • southerngent8

    Posts: 12

    Jul 16, 2012 7:12 PM GMT
    Thank you for all of the advice guys. I thought that this would be somewhere to start as far as just getting opinions on the situation. I'm just trying to figure out how to get through each day as it comes. Each day brings new struggles from my TBI, but with those struggles comes a solution to getting past it. I don't want anyone feeling sorry for me. That is not at all what I wanted. Just a little advice. Thanks again guys
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 16, 2012 7:30 PM GMT
    Everyone needs to know about the concept of a statute of limitations. Taking a wait and see attitude can, and does, depriveat people of their rights. When my brother died in an accident my parents were too distraught to pay attention when I told them about the insurance policy he told me he had recently taken out (I was a kid at the time). They didn't properly follow through and found out too late that the statute of limitations kicked in, preventing them from making a claim.

    PS - regardless of the cause of the accident you were still entitled to competent care. I get what you weregaining at even if some people didn't.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 18, 2012 1:17 AM GMT
    Hi. First I want to say I'm sorry to. Hear about your tbi. I had a tbi a year ago, and I know exactly what you are going through with memory loss, cognitive skill loss, and sequential/critical thinking skill loss. I've been through months of rehabilitation, and am lucky that my biggest issue is severe memory loss (short-term).

    As for legal action, I doubt it's worth the time or effort to pursue. The doctors missed a pretty major diagnosis, yes. But it's best for you to get on with it. There are all kinds of resources available to you, and the ABTA (American Brain Tumor Association) is an invaluable resource to turn to.

    My neurooncologist is dr. Tim cloughesy. He specializes in tbi's. If you would like to know more, please feel free to hit me up on here. And don't feel self-pity. I went through that phase, it's a really bad place to be. Things will get better but you have to do the work. The work is hard. Create a "new" normal for yourself.
    Best,
    ~will
  • kanzanrr

    Posts: 11

    Jul 19, 2012 9:09 PM GMT
    From your description of your medical event, I read your TBI was only really diagnosed by your memory deficits, so I don't see how suing the hospital that initially saw you would do any good-- the problem developed over time, you didn't have a concussion from the accident -right? The initial care does sound pretty bad, that they missed the second crushed foot, however the accident in general would bias a jury against you....Just my take for what its worth.

    Along with the prior good comments, I would also spend time researching on the internet for legitimate memory aids/supplement etc. Example this ScienceDaily.com link about a memory supplement for alzheimer's. Something new seems to show up weekly. Wish you the best.
    -----nutrient cocktail can improve memory --------
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120710120238.htm
  • shawn06

    Posts: 337

    Jul 19, 2012 10:02 PM GMT
    Well I would consider consultation with a lawyer. You may not get what you want out of it but at least you'll know if you have a case or not. It doesn't matter if it was your fault, we all make serious mistakes in life and have to suffer the consequences however if the doctors may have missed something that will inevitably effect your quality of life then go for it.
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Jul 23, 2012 11:51 AM GMT
    First off, honestly, what is taking legal action against th hospital going to do at this point? Get your memory back? My best guess is it's not.

    I have 2 very close people to me in my life who have TBI's. My best friend and my fiance. They are 2 very different people with 2 very different back grounds, yet they both have so much in common. They both have problems with fine coordination, memory, and I'm not sure if this is related to the the TBI or just a coincidence, but both of them make things up that aren't real or true all the time.
    It seems like they have such a hard time remembering all the details, so they make them up just to keep the narrative going. Most of the time I just let it slide, but when it gets really out of touch with reality I yank them back to earth. For both of them.
    I have discovered that the TBI is a mixed bag of tricks, with weird mood swings, short tempers, paranoia, and a slew of other issues but there are definitely others like you, who are going through the same things. There are also books, which I plan on reading.
    One thing my fiance has found that is working for his memory is Brahmi Goto Kola. It supports brain and nervous function and helps with many other issues. He reports having a clearer head and better memory when he remembers to take it (oddly enough). Also, one of the things that make St. John's Wort so great for depression is that it actually helps in healing the brain. That would be something I would consider. I would choose to look into alternative therapies and medicines because most pharmaceuticals do just as much bad as they do good. Do the research on the pills you take, make sure they're as good as the doctor thinks they are, most of the time they're not.
    So do your research, you'll find your answers. Good luck bud.
  • Thorbaugh

    Posts: 110

    Jul 30, 2012 7:18 AM GMT
    credo saidYou shouldn't post on RJ for advice on medical and legal concerns.

    You nearly caused the death of an entire family because you were running late for church? Are you serious? Oh, and the family members were not all fine, as you so eloquently put it. The mother almost died. What's fine about that?

    And you claim the family you hit was running late as well, which tells me that you're not claiming full responsibility for your actions. Is it because they were running late, too, that you hit them? Tell me what made you look away from the road for a "split second" while on a curvy road that most drivers would consider worthy of their full attention. Were you texting, by chance? Were you reading the bible? What were you doing?

    By the way, a god doesn't care if you're late to his/her church. Show up, drop some money in the collection plate, and your god will smile upon you.

    So, it appears you're interested in pursuing legal recourse against the hospital. Never mind the fact that the other family could have taken you to the cleaners. It appears they didn't (praise that god of yours that you didn't lose your shirt). Given the nature of your accident, you'll need damn good lawyers.

    There are term limits for medical malpractice suits - they vary by state. Assuming you have a leg to stand on, so to speak, medical malpractice suits aren't easy to win. Even the legitimate suits often end in settlements that don't get the plaintiffs anywhere near what they're looking for. You won't be retiring early, especially after you've paid the legal team.


    * Edit

    Since you're so eager to worship your god; eager to the point of nearly destroying an entire family, you should ask yourself what He would do in this case. Would your god sue, or turn the other cheek?


    I have to say CREDO - you officially have shown yourself to be an incredibly INSENSITIVE JERK!!