problems holding onto heavy weights

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 18, 2012 6:01 AM GMT
    does anyone else have problems holding onto the bar, and keeping a proper grip onto it while doing certain exercises?

    e.g. with dead lifts, i've reached a point where i'm doing 100kg with 6 sets of 8 reps. the problem i find is that i can lift it up fine, but my hands can't hold onto it for longer than 3 reps, before i have to put it down and get a proper grip of it again.
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    Jul 18, 2012 6:09 AM GMT
    Google wrist exercises. Your problem is not unique.
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    Jul 18, 2012 12:49 PM GMT
    You can also try wrist straps where you wrap the strap around the bar/dumbbell as well as your wrist. I start losing my grip with more weight, but part of my problem is that I grip the bars to hard, which weakens my ability to hold on the bar/dumbbell.
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    Jul 18, 2012 12:52 PM GMT
    I have the same problem- hands and wrists are inherently weak, and its difficult/painful holding em long enough for shoulder shrugs, side bends, etc
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 18, 2012 1:17 PM GMT
    Deadlifts are my favorite lift, and I have the same problem with them, but I just try to plow though, and let it be an endurance test as we'll as strength.
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    Jul 18, 2012 1:19 PM GMT
    I sometimes have the same problem. My trainer suggested holding the bar with one hand over hand and the other underhand so your wrists are alternating. This seems to help with the grip but if it's really heavy it can still slip.
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    Jul 18, 2012 3:00 PM GMT
    I don't like wrist straps since you're just hiding a weak point in your body. If you don't use them, your grip with get better the more you workout.

    As for deadlifts, I use an alternate grip whenever I'm over 225lbs or so and it makes a huge difference. I also use chalk to prevent sweat from making the bar slick.

    grip.jpg
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    Jul 18, 2012 3:07 PM GMT
    I had the same problem but started using the fat grip attachments when I do dumbbells
    and my gym has fit grip bars that weigh 80lbs so I just started using them instead.
    img18.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 18, 2012 3:07 PM GMT
    You can get wrist straps. It helps a lot.
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    Jul 18, 2012 3:32 PM GMT
    For deadlifts I use a mixed grip. Alternating for all sets including warmups.
    For dumbell rows I use straps.
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    Jul 18, 2012 3:37 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidGoogle wrist exercises. Your problem is not unique.
    This*^&
    rope-guy-pic.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 18, 2012 4:49 PM GMT
    Lifting gloves always help improve the grip. The addition of wrist straps for stiff-legged dead-lifts makes a huge difference.
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    Jul 18, 2012 5:00 PM GMT
    2874dc10e792ac4e24e58a3b01528da4.jpg

    get the 'captains of crush hand grippers', they really helped me improve my grip strength which before was holding me back from doing heavier weights
  • riamu79

    Posts: 42

    Jul 18, 2012 5:36 PM GMT
    Do behind the back wrist curls or farmers walks to strengthen your forearms and grip.

    When doing deads or cleans, use a double overhand grip for everything except the heaviest weight - this will work out your forearms and grip as well.
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    Jul 18, 2012 6:34 PM GMT
    just use wraps. the little strips of material that go around your wrist and onton the bar. there is no need to under work a muscle like lats because your fingers cant grip.

    no one will judge you on your grip strength...well most wont icon_lol.gif

    i used to think that doing everything raw was essential. but in reality it doesnt matter unless you are competing in a specific lift that requires raw technique.

    have a look at kai greene's treadmill confessions on youtube. he says the same "im not being judged on my grip strength, im being judged on my physique".

    he knows im right...
  • Bakerboy

    Posts: 70

    Jul 18, 2012 6:36 PM GMT
    czarodziej saidI have the same problem- hands and wrists are inherently weak, and its difficult/painful holding em long enough for shoulder shrugs, side bends, etc
    Yes, I particularly have this problem with shoulder shrugs. I end up doing smaller weights and more reps just because my hands/wrists start to hurt while holding onto them (and it doesn't help that I'm tall and have long arms).
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    Jul 18, 2012 6:41 PM GMT
    I'm a former pole vaulter, strong grip was a life and death issue ;)
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    Jul 18, 2012 6:42 PM GMT
    It seems odd to me that you're having trouble doing shoulder shrugs because of pain in your wrists/hands. Your wrist should be in line with your forearm and not flexed at all. The weight should really be hung from the shoulders. You might have an injury or something that's causing the pain.
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Jul 18, 2012 6:43 PM GMT
    Blueavenger saidI sometimes have the same problem. My trainer suggested holding the bar with one hand over hand and the other underhand so your wrists are alternating. This seems to help with the grip but if it's really heavy it can still slip.


    +1

    Under/over grip and/or straps (or chalk) ought to do the trick.
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    Jul 18, 2012 6:45 PM GMT
    Maybe you need to build more strength with the lower weights first?
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    Jul 18, 2012 9:30 PM GMT
    imasrxd saidI don't like wrist straps since you're just hiding a weak point in your body. If you don't use them, your grip with get better the more you workout.

    As for deadlifts, I use an alternate grip whenever I'm over 225lbs or so and it makes a huge difference. I also use chalk to prevent sweat from making the bar slick.

    grip.jpg
    i'll give this a try, i remember reading about it in a men's health ages ago.

    i already use a gym gloves and struggle with that, i find that if i remove the gloves i have a better grip for deadlifts.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 18, 2012 10:58 PM GMT
    Farmer's walks helped me with grip and forearm strength. Just grab some moderate-to-heavy weight in one or both hands and go for a walk.

    farmers-walk.jpg
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:08 PM GMT
    Is it that the bar feels too "loose"? If that's it, then try:
    • Weightlifting gloves
    • Wrist Straps
    • Barbells/dumbells with the bulge-type bar, which will fill your hand better (if available)
    • A rubber handgrip cover for the bar(s), to assist in making the bar both bigger and for better friction for the grip
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:34 PM GMT
    You need to up your grip strength. Google how to do that. I wouldn't use straps because that won't help you gain grip strength which not only helps build muscle in your forearms but it also helps with a lot of lifts.
  • YJacket

    Posts: 146

    Jul 22, 2012 4:10 PM GMT
    I stagnated on deadlifts for a while because my grip was weak. Actually was more because of sweaty hands--yeah, I blame friction.

    I made the two greatest discoveries that worked: chalk and a hook grip.

    The hook grip takes some getting used to, and it hurts like hell initially, but it's even better than the alternating grip. And it has carryover to other pulling exercises--olympic lifting and so on.

    When I finally pulled 500, I was very pleased that my grip didn't give way. My legs turned to jello, but that's a different matter. icon_biggrin.gif