Neanderthals had knowledge of plants' healing qualities: study

  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Jul 18, 2012 6:36 PM GMT


    Neanderthals had knowledge of plants' healing qualities: study

    http://phys.org/news/2012-07-neanderthals-knowledge-qualities.html
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    Jul 18, 2012 9:11 PM GMT
    If there's one thing I learned from all my anthropology and archaeology courses in college, it's that ancient peoples and other Homo species were a lot more clever, thoughtful, and advanced than we tend to give them credit for. These were not simple people considering they did not live simple lives. A lot of things we like to take credit for as modern humans or from past civilizations might have originated even further back in time before Homo sapiens.
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    Jul 18, 2012 9:15 PM GMT
    I wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.
    I feel sad for them. icon_cry.gif
  • monstapex

    Posts: 478

    Jul 18, 2012 9:32 PM GMT
    Aress saidI wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.
    I feel sad for them. icon_cry.gif


    ALeqM5hPPxMBZkhz4l9llzJ1BiE69DD0NQ.jpg
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    Jul 18, 2012 10:22 PM GMT
    Aress saidI wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.

    RJ
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    Jul 18, 2012 10:23 PM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidCool article!

    So...evidence of cooked starchy carbohydrates eaten by our predecessors 30,000 years ago?!

    Oh no! What will all the Paleo supporters say now?! icon_question.gificon_question.gif

    ummmmm....that they went extinct? icon_wink.gif
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Jul 18, 2012 10:48 PM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidI wasn't aware that neanderthals and modern humans coexisted together at one time. Derp! I guess it makes sense I just never thought about it. Imagine what that would be like in our present time if we had a similar yet slightly different species to us in current times. We'd probably have more wars and conflict that we already have on this planet in current time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal_extinction_hypotheses


    Yes, there is actually a book that argues that all primitive tales of monsters originate in the primeval fear homo sapiens had of their only superior predator: neanderthals. (I'm not saying I buy this. Just saying there is a book that argues this.)

    Btw, paleo is about (in part) avoiding highly cultivated and processed grains; nothing wrong with some starchy carbs.
  • blueandgold

    Posts: 396

    Jul 18, 2012 11:19 PM GMT
    Aress saidI wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.
    I feel sad for them. icon_cry.gif


    Read the Neaderthal Parrallax by Robert Sawyer. It premises an alternate universe where they hadn't died out and what their civilization would be like. The first book won the Hugo award.
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:19 PM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidI wasn't aware that neanderthals and modern humans coexisted together at one time. Derp! I guess it makes sense I just never thought about it. Imagine what that would be like in our present time if we had a similar yet slightly different species to us in current times. We'd probably have more wars and conflict that we already have on this planet in current time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal_extinction_hypotheses


    Latest DNA studies suggest we interbred in Europe, so you could very well have some neanderthal genes.
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:25 PM GMT
    Aress saidI wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.
    I feel sad for them. icon_cry.gif


    There are still echoes of homo sapiens neaderthalensis among us. No, I don't mean forum trolls, hahahah. What I'm referring to is that Europeans/Caucasians have 1-4% neanderthal DNA.
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:26 PM GMT
    minox said
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidI wasn't aware that neanderthals and modern humans coexisted together at one time. Derp! I guess it makes sense I just never thought about it. Imagine what that would be like in our present time if we had a similar yet slightly different species to us in current times. We'd probably have more wars and conflict that we already have on this planet in current time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal_extinction_hypotheses


    Latest DNA studies suggest we interbred in Europe, so you could very well have some neanderthal genes.


    Whoops, didn't read all the way down, and missed that the DNA issue was already raised. icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:28 PM GMT
    intensity69 said
    minox said
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidI wasn't aware that neanderthals and modern humans coexisted together at one time. Derp! I guess it makes sense I just never thought about it. Imagine what that would be like in our present time if we had a similar yet slightly different species to us in current times. We'd probably have more wars and conflict that we already have on this planet in current time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal_extinction_hypotheses


    Latest DNA studies suggest we interbred in Europe, so you could very well have some neanderthal genes.


    Whoops, didn't read all the way down, and missed that the DNA issue was already raised. icon_smile.gif


    So you and I are the first to think about breeding and sex with cavemen ;)
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:29 PM GMT
    minox said
    intensity69 said
    minox said
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidI wasn't aware that neanderthals and modern humans coexisted together at one time. Derp! I guess it makes sense I just never thought about it. Imagine what that would be like in our present time if we had a similar yet slightly different species to us in current times. We'd probably have more wars and conflict that we already have on this planet in current time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal_extinction_hypotheses


    Latest DNA studies suggest we interbred in Europe, so you could very well have some neanderthal genes.


    Whoops, didn't read all the way down, and missed that the DNA issue was already raised. icon_smile.gif


    So you and I are the first to think about breeding and sex with cavemen ;)


    Hahahah... I'm sure that's niche porn that's already been produced. icon_razz.gif
  • mz29xy

    Posts: 37

    Jul 18, 2012 11:29 PM GMT
    the bitter taste in certain herbs/plants is a sign of medicinal properties.
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Jul 18, 2012 11:30 PM GMT

    Previous Thread:

    DNA: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1701527
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:31 PM GMT
    minox said
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidI wasn't aware that neanderthals and modern humans coexisted together at one time. Derp! I guess it makes sense I just never thought about it. Imagine what that would be like in our present time if we had a similar yet slightly different species to us in current times. We'd probably have more wars and conflict that we already have on this planet in current time.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal_extinction_hypotheses


    Latest DNA studies suggest we interbred in Europe, so you could very well have some neanderthal genes.


    I wonder if some of the features that we think of as distinctly European, such as pale skin or blue eyes, are really from our Neanderthal ancestors! That said, it seems unlikely because Asians also have that 1-4%.
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    Jul 18, 2012 11:34 PM GMT
    To paraphrase Carl Sagan: Ancient peoples were people. Individually they were as clever as us.

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    Jul 19, 2012 1:00 PM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidCool article!

    So...evidence of cooked starchy carbohydrates eaten by our predecessors 30,000 years ago?!

    Oh no! What will all the Paleo supporters say now?! icon_question.gificon_question.gif


    Erm nothing.. it doesn´t impact the model at all icon_smile.gif

    NOW, if you can find them eating danish pastries, french bread or brownies, that would be quite another thing.
  • ZacktheMan

    Posts: 340

    Jul 24, 2012 4:11 AM GMT
    Aress saidI wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.
    I feel sad for them. icon_cry.gif


    sigh!!!


    Neanderthals never became extinct. They lived in the mountain ranges of Europe during times of cold weather, while the rest of the human populations lived in warmer lands of Far east Asia, Asia minor, and Africa. The Father of Pathology, Rudolf Virchow, determined that the apish look of their legs was simply the result of a lack of Vitamin D.

    Neanderthals had a significant longer childhood than the other humans living at that time. Certain bones in the human body do not grow much until after puberty, while other bones grow continuously during their entire life span. This accounts for the apparent differences in appearances with humans elsewhere.

    Neanderthals were fully capable of inter-breeding with other humans, therefore they were fully human. Descendants of Neanderthals are alive and well today in places like Spain, but genetically mixed with other humans that migrated from Africa and Asia Minor into Europe.

    Unfortunately, evolutionists in the 19th century and a good part of the 20th century, in their efforts to find the missing link between apes and man chose to depict the differences between Neanderthals and other humans by arranging their facial bones to look more like an ape. People with Neanderthal features are alive and well in Spain, and other locals.

    Fortunately, evolutionary paleontologists rose up against the evolutionary biologists (whom control the spending the money allotted by governments to scientists) during the last 30 years of the of the 20th century by freeing themselves to publish what they actually saw in the Fossil record rather than fabricate untruths of the geological in order to sell evolution as a fact to students and the unwary public.

    Furthermore:

    Humans are not descendants of the Apes.

    Evolutionary scientists do not believe that humans evolved from chimps or apes. They believe that because apes are most similar to humans physically, and because they assume evolution is a fact, then apes and humans must share a recent common ancestor, 'Recent' being maybe some 10, 15, or 20 million years ago. As with all such speculations, and as Paleontologists Colin Patterson has pointed out, these conjectured cousins sharing common ancestors are constructs of the evolutionary scientists imagination, and not derived from scientific findings. Patterson is far from being alone on this understanding of the fossil record:

    "All paleontologists know that the fossil record contains precious little in the way of intermediate forms; transitions between major groups are characteristically abrupt."[Gould, _The Panda's Thumb_ (1980), 189.]


    _Paleobiology_ 3: 134 (1977), Gould & Eldredge: "In fact, most published commentary on punctuated equilibria has been favorable. We are especially pleased that several paleontologists now state with pride and biological confidence a conclusion that had previously been simply embarrassing: ('all these years of work and I haven't found any evolution')."


    "The extreme rarity of transitional forms in the fossil record persists as the trade secret of paleontology. The evolutionary trees that adorn our textbooks have data only at the tips and nodes of their branches; the rest is inference, however reasonable, not the evidence of fossils." Gould, _The Panda's Thumb_ (1980), 181.

    What Gould wrote is very true. There exist no evolutionary Tree of Life. Read Romer, and others who categorize all species, orders, etc. all they have are the nodes on the tree of life, there are no branches connecting species to species transformation of a single Phylogeny, i,e, a major transformation of a line of Ancestor- descendant species evolving from an older species into a clearly evolved descendant species, not even one.

    In fact, the opposite is true. The fossil record is a record of species suddenly appearing in the fossil record, and remaining the same throughout their time in the fossil record, and are either still alive unchanged, or have became extinct.

    Human fossils with Neanderthal traits have also been found in North America, seemingly to be the first humans that settled in North America, prior to the Asian migration.



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    Jul 24, 2012 4:43 AM GMT
    Neanderthals made lots of wild guesses based on experience.

    The definition of learning (all teachers should know this) is "a change in behavior as a result of experience."

    In other words, what the neanderthals "knew" did not contain conclusive evidence; however, enough people did experience its positive effects enough to form a conclusive decision at the time.
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    Jul 26, 2012 4:27 PM GMT
    monstapex said
    Aress saidI wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.
    I feel sad for them. icon_cry.gif


    ALeqM5hPPxMBZkhz4l9llzJ1BiE69DD0NQ.jpg


    Touché.
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    Jul 26, 2012 4:30 PM GMT
    ZacktheMan said
    Aress saidI wonder what the world would be like if Neanderthals hadn't died out.
    I feel sad for them. icon_cry.gif


    Humans are not descendants of the Apes.

    Evolutionary scientists do not believe that humans evolved from chimps or apes. They believe that because apes are most similar to humans physically, and because they assume evolution is a fact, then apes and humans must share a recent common ancestor, 'Recent' being maybe some 10, 15, or 20 million years ago. As with all such speculations, and as Paleontologists Colin Patterson has pointed out, these conjectured cousins sharing common ancestors are constructs of the evolutionary scientists imagination, and not derived from scientific findings. Patterson is far from being alone on this understanding of the fossil record:


    That's very true. Chimpanzees are our "brother" species rather than our "parent" species.
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    Jul 26, 2012 4:37 PM GMT
    nicobolsillo saidIf there's one thing I learned from all my anthropology and archaeology courses in college, it's that ancient peoples and other Homo species were a lot more clever, thoughtful, and advanced than we tend to give them credit for. These were not simple people considering they did not live simple lives. A lot of things we like to take credit for as modern humans or from past civilizations might have originated even further back in time before Homo sapiens.


    This. Even their philosophies have some merit to modern times.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 26, 2012 5:03 PM GMT
    This thread reminds me of one of my favorite books, "Clan of the Cave Bear." I've never seen the movie, but I've heard it's terrible. I highly recommend the book though.icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 30, 2012 7:09 AM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidCool article!

    So...evidence of cooked starchy carbohydrates eaten by our predecessors 30,000 years ago?!

    Oh no! What will all the Paleo supporters say now?! icon_question.gificon_question.gif


    That 30,000 years isn't enough time to evolve