Personal life in workplace

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 21, 2012 11:39 PM GMT
    Recently there has been a vacancy at my place of employment for a higher position, and I received a promotion into that position.

    Well in order to fill my old position I had to review a stack of resumes, in this stack of approved resumes, that my old supervisor liked. Well I come across one that was from a person that at one time I considered my best friend however due to me coming out is no longer in my social network (his choice). I gave him the benefit of the doubt and reviewed the resume only to realize over 50% of this document is complete bullshit. My old supervisor likes him for the position and has already scheduled a face to face interview with him.

    My question is should I inform my old supervisor of this, and bring my personal life into the workplace?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 21, 2012 11:47 PM GMT
    No. Absolutely not. Just do your due diligence on all of the applicants and let the boss know about everything you found all all the candidates. Research. I know that means you'll have to do some real work but hey... it's what having a career is about.

    If he gets hired, suck it up and don't bring our personal life into the workplace. EVER. When you clock in you drop your real personality and start putting on an act for EVERYONE. You get paid to be an actor in addition to whatever else you do throughout the day. It's called "soft skills" and you have to develop them, be PC, be approachable, show personal interest in people even if you secretly hate them, etc. It keeps the money rolling in and it's a skill no one ever teaches. Once that 5 o'clock hour hits and you're outta there? you can be you again.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 12:12 AM GMT
    if he hired,torture the fuck out of him,icon_twisted.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 12:23 AM GMT
    If you know for a fact that his resume is fraudulent then you are absolutely within your right to disclose this to your boss. What difference does it make if you gained this information via a personal relationship rather than a business one?
    Just be sure that you have your facts in order and that you are absolutely certain he didn't do what he claims.
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    Jul 22, 2012 12:27 AM GMT
    Yes if you know he is being untrue with his resume And if your Job has anything to do with his hiring. At the end its your responsability to the company
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 22, 2012 12:46 AM GMT
    Daas saidNo. Absolutely not. Just do your due diligence on all of the applicants and let the boss know about everything you found all all the candidates. Research. I know that means you'll have to do some real work but hey... it's what having a career is about.

    If he gets hired, suck it up and don't bring our personal life into the workplace. EVER. When you clock in you drop your real personality and start putting on an act for EVERYONE. You get paid to be an actor in addition to whatever else you do throughout the day. It's called "soft skills" and you have to develop them, be PC, be approachable, show personal interest in people even if you secretly hate them, etc. It keeps the money rolling in and it's a skill no one ever teaches. Once that 5 o'clock hour hits and you're outta there? you can be you again.


    Wow, so would you recommend smiling when you stab someone in the back?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 1:15 AM GMT
    Thanks for all of your input. I have some emails to write.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 1:23 AM GMT
    Falsifying information on a resume is a very serious professional offense. It would be nice if you can prove he is being untruthful.

    That is extremely serious to most employers. Does he know that you work there and are in the position of reviewing those.

    This is not about your personal life, this is about dishonesty in the workplace.


    It seems like a sticky situation. You might tell your employer to have him provide references that can back up this information.

    I have interviewed prospective employees with my boss. If it were me, I would say that we were once friends, and I don't remember some of this, but I might be mistaken. I just want him to be careful. I would reinterate that I didn't want be accused of undermining his chances as long as he can back up what he is saying.

    Of course, I have a strong working relationship with my employer and he would follow up without involving me further when I explained my concerns.

    If this guy is being dishonest on a resume that calls into question whether he will be trustworthy with company resources.
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Jul 22, 2012 1:30 AM GMT
    rondan saidRecently there has been a vacancy at my place of employment for a higher position, and I received a promotion into that position.

    Well in order to fill my old position I had to review a stack of resumes, in this stack of approved resumes, that my old supervisor liked. Well I come across one that was from a person that at one time I considered my best friend however due to me coming out is no longer in my social network (his choice). I gave him the benefit of the doubt and reviewed the resume only to realize over 50% of this document is complete bullshit. My old supervisor likes him for the position and has already scheduled a face to face interview with him.

    My question is should I inform my old supervisor of this, and bring my personal life into the workplace?


    If you know the resume is bogus then you need to let your boss know.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 2:03 AM GMT
    Does your former friend know where you work? It's interesting if he doesn't want you in his social circle but would want to work with you.

    I'll echo what other guys have said-- if you know details of his resume are fraudulent, it's your responsibility to report that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 2:05 AM GMT
    I don't know... never had to deal with that... my advice would only serve to make me believe I have something worthy to contribute, when I don't.icon_sad.gif
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    Jul 22, 2012 2:14 AM GMT
    Stuttershock saidIf you know for a fact that his resume is fraudulent then you are absolutely within your right to disclose this to your boss. What difference does it make if you gained this information via a personal relationship rather than a business one?
    Just be sure that you have your facts in order and that you are absolutely certain he didn't do what he claims.

    This ^^

    Based on your post I assume that the decision to hire is yours and not your old supervisor. So if you have info that an applicant isn't truthful either personally or if another employee provided you with that feedback. You would need to take that into consideration.

    If the decision isn't yours then you need to advice whoever will be making that decision of your info. But play it very tactfully.

    Also since your old supervisor decided on the applicants your ex-friend might not be aware that you are the interviewing manager. If you discreetly make him aware then maybe he may most likely decline the interview. But make sure to cover your bases to avoid any finger pointing that you sabotaged his job prospects. Considering you were friends you may still have mutual friends?
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Jul 22, 2012 2:18 AM GMT
    In a professional environment, your best course of action is to first let him be interviewed. Then once he's been met, ask your old supervisor the following question: "Have you followed up with references on him? I'd urge you to chain references and ask for the names of other people to whom you can speak about his experience and performance. I knew him very, very well, once, socially, and I'm greatly concerned about the accuracy of the resume, so I hope you'll check carefully if he's a serious candidate for you."
    Then shut up and let the cards fall where they may.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 2:27 AM GMT
    rondan saidThanks for all of your input. I have some emails to write.


    Have some faith in your boss, if he's good he'll catch him out. You could help this along by helping your boss prepare for the interview by writing some questions you 'think would be useful. 'Tell me about your experience' with said fraudulent information.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 2:50 AM GMT
    Again thank you all for your advice. All this is new to me, I've had communication with my old supervisor and apparently I will be sitting in on the interviews and I respectfully asked to not sit in on this one.
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    Jul 22, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    I think you simply need to say something like, "I used to know this guy pretty well and there are things on this resume that are different than I remember. It might be a good idea to ask about..."

    Regardless of whether you like the guy any longer, if you don't raise a red flag, you're helping him commit a kind of fraud.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jul 22, 2012 3:00 AM GMT
    I'm not sure ... but I think that might be illegal ... it is your word against his and it could be considered defamation of character.
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    Jul 22, 2012 3:07 AM GMT
    I would suggest writing to your boss to tell him that he may not be the most qualified person for his position. It's somewhat like looking someone up on facebook to see what kind of person he or she is; everything you do has a consequence- you know someone, you can possibly pull strings. However, if you burn bridges, well business is business and if the workplace has bad chemistry with the new guy on board or an incompetent member on the team (and on that note, lying on a resumé can bring both, imo) then productivity would decrease. If you know and think this guy doesn't have what it takes (especially since you mentioned that he lied on his resumé) then you should probably bring it up to your boss, since it's for the well being of the company. Put it into professional terms, and clearly leave your baggage at the door when you break it to him. However, if your boss still decides to hire him after he takes your word into consideration, you have to deal with it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 3:19 AM GMT
    MuscleComeBack saidIn a professional environment, your best course of action is to first let him be interviewed. Then once he's been met, ask your old supervisor the following question: "Have you followed up with references on him? I'd urge you to chain references and ask for the names of other people to whom you can speak about his experience and performance. I knew him very, very well, once, socially, and I'm greatly concerned about the accuracy of the resume, so I hope you'll check carefully if he's a serious candidate for you."
    Then shut up and let the cards fall where they may.


    I agree. Because of your past friendship with this guy, you are in a sticky situation. To just come out and tell the whole story of your friendship and why it ended and then say his resume is false might make you sound like you have a vendetta and are being petty. To not say anything, however, and the guy is hired and turns out to a bad worker and it later comes out you knew him and may have had knowledge of the falsehoods in his resume could make you look bad. Best thing is to just be short on details and say you knew him in the past and strongly suggest that your boss check the references, experience, and education. After that, it is all on your boss.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 5:43 AM GMT
    In big companies, applicant management software was written by psychologists who noticed that for every position, the tasks you did the most often, you list first..followed by things you do occasionally.

    The order by which you list tasks for work experience affects resume ranking during keyword searches by hiring managers.

    Resume padding is a surprisingly common problem. I think you should just tell them you know him personally and have concerns.

    Leave it at that.
  • blueandgold

    Posts: 396

    Jul 22, 2012 5:45 AM GMT
    I wouldn't. Somehow, somewhere, you're going to come across poorly for this action either now out in the future. Your objectivity is compromised. Just keep your mouth shut.

    Ask yourself this: if this guy was still your best friend or whatever, would you still be running to your boss?

    No one ever thanks the whistle blower. You just look like a rat.

    Just my opinion, I know it differs from a lot if other peoples on here.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11835

    Jul 22, 2012 5:56 AM GMT
    When they promoted you it was their assumption you'd do what was in the best interest of the company...If indeed his resume is 50% bullshit...The business professional in you needs to inform management..This has nothing to do with social ties...Business is business...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 8:24 AM GMT
    What you are saying is...
    "I am aiding someone unqualified to fill my position"..!! Hello!!??
    You were given the task to find the most suitable aplicants for the job..!
    This person comitted fraud, is unqualified and is pretty much your enemy??
    You don't really see how this is going to bite you in the ass do you??

    Let's turn the tables
    How many business owners or managers would hire the OP to help make hiring decisions??? ...hhhmm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 2:57 PM GMT
    Thank you, all of you for your input. I really do appreciate all your comments
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    Jul 22, 2012 3:06 PM GMT
    I know you're worried that it might appear biased that you don't like him if you bring up his falsified accounts on his resume, however, not bringing it up can be worse. If he ever gets hired and then fired for a lack of skill sets that his resume asserts he possesses, you withholding that information could be misconstrued as having a personal bias for hiring him in the first place. Just make sure you have evidence to she'd light to thr fact that his resume is a fake. That being said, make sure your own resume that they have on file was not doctored as well.