What would you do if you were diagnosed with cancer?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 22, 2012 4:21 PM GMT
    ...and let's say you still have time to react. You're not going to drop dead "tomorrow." But you dont know if the therapy will cure you or not.
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    Jul 22, 2012 4:39 PM GMT
    I am a survivor of advanced stage cancer; I'd do anything to survive it again just as I have already done the first time. The chemo is so hard on your body that you lose your hair and taste buds as your pores are always releasing the chemicals; I needed pot to survive it. Strange thing is after my final surgery and after the chemicals wore off after a few weeks or so, I felt like a brand new human being. They say chemo changes your hair when it grows back, but mine grew back the same. The experience was one I will never forget. I learned so much about myself after surviving it.
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    Jul 22, 2012 7:50 PM GMT
    Sustenance saidI am a survivor of advanced stage cancer; I'd do anything to survive it again just as I have already done the first time. The chemo is so hard on your body that you lose your hair and taste buds as your pores are always releasing the chemicals; I needed pot to survive it. Strange thing is after my final surgery and after the chemicals wore off after a few weeks or so, I felt like a brand new human being. They say chemo changes your hair when it grows back, but mine grew back the same. The experience was one I will never forget. I learned so much about myself after surviving it.


    wow
    inspirational story mate.

    xx
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    Jul 22, 2012 7:51 PM GMT
    Sustenance saidI am a survivor of advanced stage cancer; I'd do anything to survive it again just as I have already done the first time. The chemo is so hard on your body that you lose your hair and taste buds as your pores are always releasing the chemicals; I needed pot to survive it. Strange thing is after my final surgery and after the chemicals wore off after a few weeks or so, I felt like a brand new human being. They say chemo changes your hair when it grows back, but mine grew back the same. The experience was one I will never forget. I learned so much about myself after surviving it.

    What did you do the first time to survive it?
  • A_1991

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    Jul 22, 2012 7:52 PM GMT
    Start cooking meth.
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    Jul 22, 2012 7:53 PM GMT
    i would be excited, if it would kill me really fast
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    Jul 22, 2012 7:54 PM GMT
    Indulge in things I would have otherwise avoided if it was not a treatable cancer.

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    Jul 22, 2012 7:59 PM GMT
    ATC84 saidIndulge in things I would have otherwise avoided if it was not a treatable cancer.


    And if there was therapy, but it was not certain if you would be cured? What would you do?
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    Jul 22, 2012 8:12 PM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo said<-- Multiple cancer survivor here. I've gone through hell and back twice.

    I've made so many changes to my life, my outlook, healing myself and my mind. If I were to get cancer again I'm not sure what I'd do. I don't think I can go through the treatments again. I may just let nature take its course.

    I sort of went crazy after the second one. By the time the first one went into remission I had a second distinct cancer in less than twelve months. With that type of experience I felt/feel like a time bomb ready to go off (again). It's exhausting.

    Good answer. Thanks.

    What do you mean by "healing myself"?
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    Jul 22, 2012 8:24 PM GMT
    A_1991 saidStart cooking meth.


    Ok breaking bad haha
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    Jul 22, 2012 8:31 PM GMT
    running11 said
    A_1991 saidStart cooking meth.


    Ok breaking bad haha


    OMG i just finished season 4! I totally got that reference.

    ON Topic:

    Live everyday as I do now. Like stated in 'Breaking Bad' "everyone has a death sentence from birth". Cancer changes nothing except the timer, and in life as uncertain as this, no one knows how long they have so why worry?
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    Jul 22, 2012 8:47 PM GMT
    I wrote a will, a living will and assigned a health care proxy.

    This is an easy one since it's not hypothetical - I was in fact diagnosed, had time to react and from the outset it was considered terminal.

    The preliminary diagnosis was leukemia but while everyone else was freaking out I took the position that I wasn't going to think about it until I had a final diagnosis, and didn't. Except in the week interim between the preliminary and final diagnosis while awaiting the bone marrow biopsy results when I addressed the practical aspects and did that paperwork.

    The final diagnosis wasn't as bad, just a rare incurable cancer of undetermined prognosis, Stage IV. It's been about a decade and several relapses, remissions and treatment protocols later at Memorial Sloan Kettering I'm considered a rock star. I don't worry about turning 50, I'm just glad I'm making it.
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    Jul 22, 2012 8:55 PM GMT
    I don't know what I'd do exactly but I know for a fact I would be a hell of a lot more productive and stop wasting so much time.

    We all know we are going to die, that we have a limited amount of time here but it's just so easy to forget that and take it for granted.

    It would give me a real sense of my mortality which even as I write this I don't really feel.
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    Jul 22, 2012 9:53 PM GMT
    Good answers, guys. Thanks for responding.
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    Jul 22, 2012 10:37 PM GMT
    Caslon20000 said
    Sustenance saidI am a survivor of advanced stage cancer; I'd do anything to survive it again just as I have already done the first time. The chemo is so hard on your body that you lose your hair and taste buds as your pores are always releasing the chemicals; I needed pot to survive it. Strange thing is after my final surgery and after the chemicals wore off after a few weeks or so, I felt like a brand new human being. They say chemo changes your hair when it grows back, but mine grew back the same. The experience was one I will never forget. I learned so much about myself after surviving it.

    What did you do the first time to survive it?


    Well, I went through two surgeries (one in the beginning and one at the end) and 4 months of chemotherapy 4 days a week.

    On a personal level, I had to open myself up to the idea of God and spirit because confronting my emotions alone was very hard. I really had to throw myself out there to others who were also fighting it and sometimes others who were fighting it threw themselves out to me.

    You really can overcome anything with the strong desire to live. I tell most people who are diagnosed with it or dealing with someone diagnosed with it that you have to fight the negative feelings that come with it and believe that God wants what it best and is there for those who look at the bright side of things. There are always bright sides to it... For instance, I had so many people (friends and family) that fought the good fight along with me.

    I mentioned that I smoked weed, I believe I had to because the medication they give you for sickness and appetite simply do not work. I needed to eat and eating was gross without taste buds to help.

    I know many will be prejudice towards the idea of spirit unless you have been through cancer yourself, but spirit is a reality and I quickly became aware that life is a neverending experience. I became aware of having fought cancer off in a previous lifetime as crazy as that sounds. I had faith I would do it again!

    Perhaps it is all part of psychosis when confronted with death. I am a strong believer when it comes to metaphysics. I will always be there in spirit for those fighting cancer just as those fighting cancer will always be there for me. I am still human, but I am also freed from fear through becoming spiritually aware.
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    Jul 22, 2012 10:45 PM GMT
    Thank you for your reply, Sustenance. Good response.
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    Jul 22, 2012 10:47 PM GMT
    I would fight it to a degree but not till I was a walking skeleton.As a Christian I dont fear death.This life is just a passage to eternal life.Ryan
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    Jul 22, 2012 10:56 PM GMT
    Whoa! I was just thinking about this today. This is what I would do if in case the treatments didn't quite work as well as expected:

    I would somehow work meaningful things in-between my treatments, write remembrances...a sort of mini autobiography. Take photos of all the places and things that meant something to me and make a scrapbook, collect all the music I loved to play at my memorial and contact all the people I knew to let them know how I loved them and what they brought to my life. Then travel to all the places I want to see.

    This post rates three out of five Debbie Downers.
    debbie_downer-150x150.jpgdebbie_downer-150x150.jpgdebbie_downer-150x150.jpg

    Bwa-BWAAAH!
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    Jul 22, 2012 10:59 PM GMT
    I was given a 10% chance of survival from a brain tumor.

    I never told anyone I had cancer and I didn't get treatment straight away, I was happy doing something and unconcerned about dying after finally being happy.

    But I went through treatment after talking to doctors, a radical new kind of treatment that didn't involve chemo. It was a specific kind of radio therapy and injections of drugs.

    I went for it, more out of guilt for family then for my own desire to survive. Actually I'd accepted I was going to die and I'd found a great deal of peace in that knowledge, but I couldn't bare to tell my family I was going to die and they would have to watch it happen.

    Now, I get the joys of having a fuzzy brain that doesn't function like it used too, a body that isn't the same as it once was.

    But I've gained one very valuable thing that happens to make it worth while, even just a little bit.

    An ability to take the fears I have, the hatred I experience, the anger of my own body and smoosh it all down into something useful that drives me forward to achieving something else.

    I've also worked out that I don't need much at all, that what I really need I already had, that what I really need is love, laughter and happy memories

    If there is a next time, I'm saying no... not because of what it did to me, not because I couldn't do it again or because I want to die, but simply because I already have everything I need and if I need to leave it I go out knowing I had everything I needed and wanted.
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    Jul 22, 2012 11:09 PM GMT
    WickedRyan saidI would fight it to a degree but not till I was a walking skeleton.As a Christian I dont fear death.This life is just a passage to eternal life.Ryan

    Thanks for responding.

    How would you fight it, Ryan?
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    Jul 22, 2012 11:12 PM GMT
    lilTanker saidIf there is a next time, I'm saying no... not because of what it did to me, not because I couldn't do it again or because I want to die, but simply because I already have everything I need and if I need to leave it I go out knowing I had everything I needed and wanted.

    Ok, so you would do nothing for your stated reasons. Thanks for answering.
  • Timbales

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    Jul 22, 2012 11:13 PM GMT
    depends on what kind
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    Jul 22, 2012 11:14 PM GMT
    RowBuddy saidLately, someone I know found out they have cancer, and I have thought that if I found out I did, I would just let it take me. It seems like a good way to go. I would have time, presumably, to take care of my estate, and sell everything, and make sure the money goes where I want it. That way nobody fights, and my family is not burdened with taxes. I would just hook up the morphine drip and bide my time till the end. I really do not see a future for myself other than being old and alone in a warehouse for old people, pooping my pants and worrying about bedsores anyhow. No visitors, no family. Ive never had a boyfriend longer than a couple months or so and I have never seen a gay relationship last longer than several years. I can't really have kids of my own, and I am not sure I believe in gay marriage. The more gay people I meet the more I find them shallow and petty and flakes. I don't belong in the gay world just as much as I don't belong in the straight world. I would rather die young and painlessly than endure for years with slowly declining health 50 years after all my family is gone, never having known love or what its like to have a family of my own, let alone a legacy.

    Thanks for responding, Sunshine. icon_eek.gif
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    Jul 22, 2012 11:16 PM GMT
    Timbales saiddepends on what kind

    pick a kind ... or a couple of kinds. What would you do in case of prostate cancer or pancreatic cancer or lung cancer or testicular cancer? Any one?
  • Timbales

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    Jul 22, 2012 11:31 PM GMT
    Caslon20000 said
    Timbales saiddepends on what kind

    pick a kind ... or a couple of kinds. What would you do in case of prostate cancer or pancreatic cancer or lung cancer or testicular cancer? Any one?


    there are lots of different kinds, and different stages, so I really don't know.