How do you filter through contradicting information?

  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    Jul 22, 2012 9:29 PM GMT
    There's obviously many ways out there to reach a desired physique but how did you figure out what would work for you? For instance it's consistently stated that carbs are bad or fats are bad then the information is turned around. From a physiological standpoint some nutritional doctors claim that in order to remain in an anabolic state exercise should be performed on an empty stomach in order to activate the flight or fight response which promotes the release of hormones. Other opinions state that its best to maintain to a 2:1 ratio of carbs to protein before and after a workout to stimulate the muscles and by avoiding fat fast absorption is guaranteed but others will say fat is necessary to stimulate testosterone production.

    Other plans will follow the ideas that you should cut out fats or carbs at specific times. So really what can be done? I for one follow the idea of consuming primarily good fats and protein while saving carbs for before and after a workout or carb loading the night before, as I'm trying to add strength and tone.

    What do you do? Do you feel like your plan works? If it works how much trial and error was experienced before finding your ideal plan to meet your goals?
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    Jul 23, 2012 1:22 AM GMT
    Artesin saidThere's obviously many ways out there to reach a desired physique but how did you figure out what would work for you? For instance it's consistently stated that carbs are bad or fats are bad then the information is turned around. From a physiological standpoint some nutritional doctors claim that in order to remain in an anabolic state exercise should be performed on an empty stomach in order to activate the flight or fight response which promotes the release of hormones. Other opinions state that its best to maintain to a 2:1 ratio of carbs to protein before and after a workout to stimulate the muscles and by avoiding fat fast absorption is guaranteed but others will say fat is necessary to stimulate testosterone production.

    Other plans will follow the ideas that you should cut out fats or carbs at specific times. So really what can be done? I for one follow the idea of consuming primarily good fats and protein while saving carbs for before and after a workout or carb loading the night before, as I'm trying to add strength and tone.

    What do you do? Do you feel like your plan works? If it works how much trial and error was experienced before finding your ideal plan to meet your goals?


    Recently, I've switched to a high-protein/low(er)-carb diet that includes a reasonable amount of healthy fats. I've completely cut out fried food, processed snacks (chips, pretzels), sweets, pasta, and bread. I eat primarily lean meats (chicken, turkey, fish, seafood, lamb, eggs), fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, greek yogurt, and some cheese. (Plus, protein shakes.) If you do that, get plenty of sleep, and lift heavy you'll see gains.

    I think most people put too much thought and analysis into diet. I know I did. Just use common sense, and eat healthy.
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    Jul 23, 2012 1:48 AM GMT
    It basically comes down to getting a calorie surplus while getting adequate amounts of protein. When you eat your food doesn't really matter imo. How much protein you need to build muscle is another debate that plenty of people disagree on. I've seen people who had amazing results eating less than a gram per pound of bodyweight a day, so that leads me to believe that the supplement companies are telling people to eat more than they actually need because they want you to buy more protein.
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    Jul 23, 2012 2:44 AM GMT
    joe122 saidIt basically comes down to getting a calorie surplus while getting adequate amounts of protein. When you eat your food doesn't really matter imo. How much protein you need to build muscle is another debate that plenty of people disagree on. I've seen people who had amazing results eating less than a gram per pound of bodyweight a day, so that leads me to believe that the supplement companies are telling people to eat more than they actually need because they want you to buy more protein.


    You do have a valid point..the best results iv'e had ..the past three weeks..a 1600 calorie diet...
    i am 36.. 6'1.5 and now 186..The fact that i am pre diabetic changes all the rules..
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Jul 23, 2012 5:04 AM GMT
    It's all about the well planned evidence based studies for me. Gotta either wade through the literature, or follow someone that does.
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    Jul 23, 2012 5:13 AM GMT
    Some information works for some people's bodies, and other information works for other people's bodies; and still there are other bodies go between the given information and are their own combination of metabolism, diet, weight training, cardio and/or yoga. Find what your body type is, and do what works for you, and not works for your gym buddy; unless you both have the EXACT body types.
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Aug 19, 2012 9:03 PM GMT
    I read as much as I can on the subject, which ever side of the argument has the most valid points and isn't just a fad driven diet scam then I'll take it more seriously. Then I'll try to put it into affect in my own diet, and I it works it works, if not I try something else. I'm actually trying to find the right balance for my diet. I cut out most intense carbs for a long time so I could tone up then I realized I was running wicked low on energy. I eat more grains now, and I seem to be fine. Trial and error, but and educated guided trial and error is the way to go.