UT San Diego - Five worst presidents and why

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    Jul 24, 2012 4:55 PM GMT
    http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jul/22/presidential-busts/
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    Jul 25, 2012 6:58 AM GMT
    JP_Crankworthy saidI suppose this makes sense if you live your life entirely within the right-wing bubble, which you do.

    To the rest of the world, this piece is just silly.


    " if you live your life entirely within the right-wing bubble,"

    I do
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 25, 2012 12:33 PM GMT
    Mostly it is a temper tantrum against Obama.

    Turning to Carter, inflation ran high, but it did under Ford. Under Carter, not Reagan or Ford or Nixon, degregulation started: the communication industry (it was the Carter administration that pursued the case against ATT ending their monopoly), transportation (trucking and the airline industry and the process of dismanteling the ICC) and oil. Releasing the potential of our economy was not a GOP idea, but a democratic one.

    Debt under Carter as a % of GDP dropped, but rose to staggering heights under Reagan.
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    Jul 25, 2012 12:52 PM GMT
    Oh that "neutral" UT San Diego. Grain of salt, anyone? Or maybe a block of salt?

    http://www.sandiegoreader.com/weblogs/news-ticker/2012/jun/07/union-tribune-owners-family-members-climb-aboard-r/

    As noted here earlier, Union-Tribune owner Douglas F. Manchester has been a long-time financial supporter of presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

    Back in January, Manchester gave $25,000 to the Romney-backing Super PAC, "Restore our Future," on top of the same amount he'd contributed to the PAC the August before.

    And this March 21, the developer-publisher kicked in $10,000 to the federal campaign account of the local GOP, according to a Federal Election Commission filing.

    The San Diego hotel mogul's enthusiasm for multi-millionaire Romney, who owns a beach house in La Jolla where he hangs out during surfing breaks from the campaign trail, is shared by other members of the Manchester family, according to a disclosure report posted online by the FEC.

    Leading the list is Elizabeth C. Manchester, the publisher's estranged wife, who gave $2500 to Romney for President, Inc. on February 29.

    According to the disclosure, she's given a total of $3000 to the Romney cause so far.

    The couple's son, Douglas W. Manchester, who is listed as working for his father's Manchester Financial Group and has an address in Austin, Texas, where the firm is in the business of real estate development, gave $2500 the same day his mother did, according to the records.

    The website of Manchester Senior's La Jolla-based company says his son graduated from Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and since then "has applied his business knowledge in all aspects of the hotel, insurance and real estate industries.

    "This career path has led him to Austin to engage the firm in commercial real estate ventures and hotel development."

    U-T scribes have thus far kept clear of a national debate of sorts now raging over Romney and his beachfront La Jolla residence, once owned by ex-San Diego Democratic mayor Maureen O'Connor, widow of Republican Jack-in-the-Box multi-millionaire Bob Peterson.

    Yesterday the New York Times posted a lengthy piece chronicling the trials and tribulations of Romney's neighbors in the tony Barber Tract, including worries by a gay couple in the neighborhood that the former Massachusetts governor will supersize his relatively modest house on the sand into a view-blocking McMansion.

    The Times story brought a quick retort from a pundit with the conservative Weekly Standard, who claimed the piece was "politically loaded" against the Mormon candidate and asked, Is Romney holding Fast and Testimony meetings in the middle of his cul-de-sac? What do his neighbors care about his religion?
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    Jul 25, 2012 12:58 PM GMT
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/11/business/media/san-diego-union-tribune-open-about-its-pro-business-motives.html

    "Newspaper as Business Pulpit"

    There is a growing worry that the falling value and failing business models of many American newspapers could lead to a situation where moneyed interests buy papers and use them to prosecute a political and commercial agenda.

    That future appears to have arrived in San Diego, where The U-T San Diego, the daily newspaper bought by the local developer and hotelier Douglas F. Manchester, often seems like a brochure for his various interests.

    Mr. Manchester is anti-big government, anti-tax and anti-gay marriage. And he’s in favor of a remade San Diego centered around a new downtown waterfront stadium and arena.

    Public agencies that have not gotten the hint have found themselves investigated in the news pages of The U-T. A sports columnist who was skeptical of the plans found himself out of a job, and the newspaper has published front-page editorials and wraparound sections to promote political allies who share its agenda. According to several employees at the paper, a feature called “Making a Difference” has included flattering profiles of many of Mr. Manchester’s associates.

    The oddest part? Mr. Manchester and the chief executive, John T. Lynch, who also owns part of the paper, are completely open about their motives.

    “We make no apologies,” Mr. Lynch said by telephone on Friday. “We are doing what a newspaper ought to do, which is to take positions. We are very consistent — pro-conservative, pro-business, pro-military — and we are trying to make a newspaper that gets people excited about this city and its future.”

    He added: “We totally respect the journalistic integrity of our paper and there is a clear line of demarcation between our editorials and our news. Our editor, Jeff Light, calls the shots.” (Mr. Manchester was traveling in Europe and unavailable for comment.)

    Others in San Diego are not so sure. Rob Davis is a senior writer at Voice of San Diego, a Web site covering the city, and has watched as The U-T has become a player rather than observer in civic events. He points out that when officials at the Port of San Diego, a public agency that oversees the land in question, did not warm to The U-T’s big development plan (which it unveiled on its front page), the agency was soon the subject of investigative pieces about its finances. “The U-T is an important institution in this city and you want to see it succeed,” Mr. Davis said, “but there is a very real fear here that it will not be advocating for the public’s good, but the owner’s good instead.”

    Many of us grew up in towns where the daily paper was in bed with civic leaders, but the shared interest was generally expressed on the editorial page. Occasionally, appropriate lines of inquiry would be suspiciously ignored in coverage, but the news pages were just that, news.

    At The U-T, which was known as The San Diego Union-Tribune when it was owned by the Copley family, that pretense was obliterated from the start. Mr. Manchester was no stranger to politics, having contributed $125,000 in support of Proposition 8, which bans gay marriage in California, and suffering some boycotts at his hotels as a result.

    After Mr. Manchester bought the newspaper last November, he brought in Mr. Lynch, a radio executive who, like Mr. Manchester, believed that a new stadium for the Chargers was crucial to the city’s future. In an interview soon after the purchase, Mr. Lynch told Mr. Davis the sports pages should advocate for a new stadium and “call out those who don’t as obstructionists.”

    A longtime sports columnist, Tim Sullivan, was skeptical. He noted that the previous stadium deal had not worked out well for the city and wrote that if a new stadium was to be erected, due caution was required.

    A week ago Friday, he was brought in to the editor’s office and fired. A huge uproar ensued, with posts on Facebook and Twitter and many calls of protest to the newspaper. Mr. Sullivan has since entered negotiations over his departure and would not discuss the specifics of his firing. But in the days after he was let go, he did comment to a local blog on what he believed was behind his dismissal.

    “Mr. Lynch appears to be of a mind to make the stadium happen and bulldoze the opposition or even those who raise questions,” Mr. Sullivan told the Sherman Report, a sports media blog.

    Mr. Lynch said his real problem with Mr. Sullivan was that he was not on board with the newspaper’s plan to emphasize multimedia. He said the parties had begun discussions that may lead to a truce. “That door is not closed yet,” Mr. Lynch said. (Mr. Sullivan said on his Facebook page on Thursday night that his employment status had been changed to “on vacation.”)

    Mr. Lynch says the newspaper needs to stop acting like one in order to be a viable business. The U-T has begun a television initiative and one of its first moves was to start a talk show that is co-anchored by Scott Kaplan. A former radio personality who once worked for Mr. Lynch, Mr. Kaplan was fired from his sports talk show, according to The U-T, for describing a female television host as a “beast,” an “animal,” a “monster” and a “sasquatch of a woman.”

    “That show is embarrassing,” a staff member said of the new U-T talk show, “but then a lot of embarrassing things have gone on around here since they took over.” He declined to be identified, in part because Mr. Sullivan had been openly critical of multimedia initiatives and that did not turn out well for him.

    The reporters and others have pointed to the frantic level of promotion for various political candidates as over-the-top and damaging to the paper’s credibility. For instance, The U-T presented a wraparound of a sample ballot for the conservative, pro-development candidates it endorsed on the Sunday before the election and again last Tuesday, the day of the election. On Monday, there was a front-page editorial in support of Carl DeMaio, the candidate for mayor that Mr. Manchester supports.

    Mr. Lynch says the only agenda he and Mr. Manchester have is making San Diego a better place, one with a newspaper that has a business path to survival. He’s confident that having a newspaper with skin in the game is part of the solution. (Confident enough to suggest that they may be in the market for other properties, including The Orange County Register, which has been put up for sale.)

    In a sense, it’s back to the future for newspapers, to a time when they didn’t make much money but could enrich their owners by advancing their agendas in other areas. But papers were legion then; even midsize American cities supported many varieties — liberal and conservative, morning and afternoon, pro-business and pro-socialist.

    In San Diego, there’s a strong weekly, The San Diego Reader, and a great news Web site, Voice of San Diego. But The U-T has the brawn and ubiquity of a daily newspaper. As the only game in town, it seems determined to not just influence the conversation, but control it.
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    Jul 25, 2012 2:53 PM GMT
    You're welcome! icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 25, 2012 3:31 PM GMT
    Never trust a Republican. That's all I need to know.
  • HottJoe

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    Jul 25, 2012 3:56 PM GMT
    GordonLee90232 saidThat was a very interesting article thank you very much for posting it because it is always good to see the opinion of other people and then that helps each of us to get our own opinion because we can think about the other opinion. And also I do not see anythings in there that were not correct so it seems to me that it is more of a news article than an opinion unless other people who read the article can point out what was not correct in there.


    Below is an example of opinion/speculation from the article--and it's just a small slice all that's there.

    "He promised a smart, sweeping overhaul of the U.S. health care system, but ended up giving us a Byzantine mess promoted to the public with myths: that offering subsidized care to tens of millions of people would save money; that people would keep their own doctors; that access to care wouldn’t change; and that rationing would never happen."--quoted from article.

    No one can know with certainty that Obama's promises are "myths," because they have not yet been implemented. The article draws on facts to make opinions. It's a fluffy piece, really. Anyone with a bone to pick could've written it.

    Personally, I think Obama is on the right track and that his promises are good ones.icon_wink.gif
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    Jul 25, 2012 5:57 PM GMT
    And if there's anyone demonstrating they've got bones to pick, it's the leadership of the U-T San Diego.
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    Jul 25, 2012 5:59 PM GMT
    ConfederateGhost saidNever trust a Republican. That's all I need to know.

    My dad was a republican.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 25, 2012 6:47 PM GMT
    smartmoney said
    ConfederateGhost saidNever trust a Republican. That's all I need to know.

    My dad was a republican.


    So?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 25, 2012 7:11 PM GMT
    So is my entire family, and if I trusted them I would be living a forced and unhappy hetersexual, christian life.

    I live in the hub of Republicanism...Alabama. Never trust a Republican.


    smartmoney said
    ConfederateGhost saidNever trust a Republican. That's all I need to know.

    My dad was a republican.