When should I switch my diets from loosing weight to gaining muscle?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 25, 2012 3:55 PM GMT
    At what point do you change your diet from weight loss to muscle gain? Should I get all the way down to my goal waist (28/29) before switching to muscle gain mode, or should I go ahead and do muscle gain mode now, and hope the higher metabolism that results helps me keep my waist in check?

    What are your experiences getting smaller/bigger, when's the best time to switch to maintain the lean look?
  • Fritter

    Posts: 1696

    Jul 25, 2012 7:48 PM GMT
    I'm having the hardest time with this question myself. I've vastly improved my diet since starting working out seriously about 5 years ago, however I have been stuck gaining and loosing the same 5 lbs for about a year. Sometimes I wonder if I need to go to a super clean diet, or if I need to go the other way, asking myself "Am I eating enough?"
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    Jul 25, 2012 9:40 PM GMT
    Simultaneously.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 25, 2012 10:38 PM GMT
    leto82 saidAt what point do you change your diet from weight loss to muscle gain? Should I get all the way down to my goal waist (28/29) before switching to muscle gain mode, or should I go ahead and do muscle gain mode now, and hope the higher metabolism that results helps me keep my waist in check?

    What are your experiences getting smaller/bigger, when's the best time to switch to maintain the lean look?

    It's hard for us to say w/o looking at pictures of you now. From what I could see in your profile pics you seem pretty lean so I say go on a bulk.
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    Jul 25, 2012 11:55 PM GMT
    I found this article, which seems to have some pretty good advice. particularly the body fat threshold. Any thoughts you guys have on it?

    http://www.aworkoutroutine.com/should-i-build-muscle-or-lose-fat-first/
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Jul 26, 2012 12:05 AM GMT
    I'm not persuaded the switch has to be that dramatic. If you eliminate processed carbs, and other garbage food, keep your proteins and healthy fats high, and work out hard, you should not need to "switch" your diet very much. A healthy diet is a healthy diet. You can tweak your carb intake a bit to account for different caloric needs, but unless you are a bodybuilder preparing for a contest, or an athlete trying to make weight, you should just stick with a whole-food, natural diet.
    If you think you need extra weight, add a sweet potato every day. If you want to lose some weight, drop the sweet potato.
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    Jul 26, 2012 12:22 AM GMT
    GWriter saidI'm not persuaded the switch has to be that dramatic. If you eliminate processed carbs, and other garbage food, keep your proteins and healthy fats high, and work out hard, you should not need to "switch" your diet very much. A healthy diet is a healthy diet. You can tweak your carb intake a bit to account for different caloric needs, but unless you are a bodybuilder preparing for a contest, or an athlete trying to make weight, you should just stick with a whole-food, natural diet.
    If you think you need extra weight, add a sweet potato every day. If you want to lose some weight, drop the sweet potato.


    +1

    Don't eat stupid.
  • Kwokpot

    Posts: 329

    Jul 26, 2012 2:16 AM GMT
    GWriter saidI'm not persuaded the switch has to be that dramatic. If you eliminate processed carbs, and other garbage food, keep your proteins and healthy fats high, and work out hard, you should not need to "switch" your diet very much. A healthy diet is a healthy diet. You can tweak your carb intake a bit to account for different caloric needs, but unless you are a bodybuilder preparing for a contest, or an athlete trying to make weight, you should just stick with a whole-food, natural diet.
    If you think you need extra weight, add a sweet potato every day. If you want to lose some weight, drop the sweet potato.

    This seems to be a frequent question, especially from many guys that are on the lean side and looking to bulk up. The problem becomes that if one is looking to gain 10-20 lbs of muscle and LOOK dramatically bigger, that would require a constant and ongoing diet change. I see some guys saying they hate to eat more food but want to look as if they are 10 lbs bigger. If that's not your natural size, any gains made through supplements would be gone unless you plan to maintian those suppliments indefinately. You notice male actors constantly changing looks to suit a particular role, and after the movie's finished shooting,, they go back to their normal routines. Look at how differently Gerald Butler looks before and after shooting a movie.
  • Jerebear

    Posts: 329

    Jul 26, 2012 2:52 AM GMT
    The article you cited is basically sound.

    Track your scale weight and your body fat percentage for at least 6 to 8 weeks. If you are losing more lean mass than fat mass, its time to stop losing weight. If you lose any more weight, it will only make your partitioning ratio worse, and you will lose proportionally more lean mass. Maintain for a least a month before the switch, and then gain slow. Track your weight and fat percentage as you do that and at some point you will be gaining more fat mass than lean mass. If you gain any more weight your partitioning ratio will get worse, and you will gain proportionally more fat. So you go back to losing, and so on, and so on.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 26, 2012 3:02 AM GMT
    Just listen to your body. Here's a big secrete though, high protein food actually lets you build muscle and loose weight at the same time! so no more shitty carbs, only good carbs and never alone - pair it with protein, fat or fiber. fat is good for maintaining endurance, like avocados or coconut oil. not bacon. um just eat protein and play on.
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    Jul 26, 2012 3:05 AM GMT
    ps - being lean is optimal for health. and isn't living healthy the point? guys that lift and lift and take all these supplements to bulk up are only destroying their bodies - not caring for them. and in a few years they'll be fat.
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    Jul 26, 2012 3:40 AM GMT
    Jerebear saidThe article you cited is basically sound.

    Track your scale weight and your body fat percentage for at least 6 to 8 weeks. If you are losing more lean mass than fat mass, its time to stop losing weight. If you lose any more weight, it will only make your partitioning ratio worse, and you will lose proportionally more lean mass. Maintain for a least a month before the switch, and then gain slow. Track your weight and fat percentage as you do that and at some point you will be gaining more fat mass than lean mass. If you gain any more weight your partitioning ratio will get worse, and you will gain proportionally more fat. So you go back to losing, and so on, and so on.


    I had never thought of transitioning like that. I would have just jumped straight in to "Lets eat 600 more calories starting today, and a new workout routine" Makes more sense to maintain for a bit. Also, I'm at 15% BFP from what the calculators tell me (though I had it professionally checked a few months ago, I have since lost a few pounds). So I am going to try to loose a few more lbs of fat (sensibly, of course) before adding in the suggested sweet potato.

    Thanks all for the advice, you guys are the best.