Will weight lifting prevent weight loss?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 26, 2012 4:32 AM GMT
    I want to lose about 50 pounds, but I'm afraid that lifting weights is going to make that difficult, since I feel like I'll probably gain more weight if I pack on muscle, when I know I need to lose a significant amount. Is weight lifting needed in order to lose weight (aside from a healthy diet)?
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    Jul 26, 2012 4:48 AM GMT
    A mixture of both, more cardio though.


    I recommend buying P90X

    or

    12259558230ejV0a.jpg
  • Jaxom

    Posts: 118

    Jul 26, 2012 5:56 AM GMT
    Weight as a number is less useful than body fat %. And if you don't go nuts with weights and get huge bulky muscles you'll lose more weight than just cardio and diet alone. I've read a few recent studies that say this, but it's been long enough, and it's sufficiently late enough at this time that I can't be bothered to find my source, but I'm sure everybody around here will say the same.
  • insomniaxed

    Posts: 16

    Jul 26, 2012 1:27 PM GMT
    I agree with Jaxom with that one. I haven't had the need to lose the weight myself but I always suggest adding weight lifting to friends who are trying to lose it.
    I think I've read something about muscles burning off more calories than fat does, don't know how accurate that is, but I'm sure there are other reasons as well.
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    Jul 26, 2012 1:38 PM GMT
    Muscle tissue is hungrier when active than fat ever will be - someone who is athletic and with a large amount of muscle mass will burn fat faster, given they don't consume huge amounts of calories.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Jul 26, 2012 1:41 PM GMT
    Try compound routines, 3 sets, 12-15 reps
    Maybe circuits

    I alternative between that and heavy weighted routine
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    Jul 27, 2012 12:32 AM GMT
    I understand the OP's concern. When I was in the process of losing 70 lbs a couple years ago, it was always a drawback when I lifted a few days and woke up the next week with 100 extra lbs of solid muscle. So frustrating!

    /sarcasm
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jul 27, 2012 12:52 AM GMT
    I've never been overweight and, when I was 22, did gain weight when I took up weight lifting. However, the gain was all muscle.

    An overweight person may temporarily gain weight upon taking up weight lifting, but generally the weight gain will be temporary. Because muscle has a higher metabolism rate than fat, the gain in muscle mass would generally be followed by a loss of fat resulting, in the long term, a weight loss.

    Ideally the weight lifting would be accompanied with aerobic exercise such as running, swimming, or bicycle riding. Running may temporarily be inappropriate for someone who is very overweight since the excessive weight could cause joint problems in which case fast walking could be more appropriate. Also, unless the heart is in good condition, increasing the level of aerobic exercise too quickly could be dangerous; a visit to the doctor first could be a good idea.
  • sybiko

    Posts: 26

    Jul 27, 2012 3:53 AM GMT
    If you know how to use weights to suit your goals, they can be very effective for fat burning. Why stick to just cardio? Sure you'll eventually get thinner, but you won't have any muscles to fill you out, just left over skin icon_sad.gif

    Personally, I've never understood how people can ignore the use of weights when they're trying to lose fat.
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Jul 27, 2012 3:55 AM GMT
    Lots of reps at low to moderate weights along with cardio will help you lose and firm up.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jul 27, 2012 6:51 AM GMT
    waccamatt saidLots of reps at low to moderate weights along with cardio will help you lose and firm up.


    That's very vague. To some people, lots of reps means 10 to 12. To other people, it means at least 30. I firmly believe in quantification instead of making statements that are subject to wide interpretation.

    In general, I think it makes more sense to increase the weight when one is able to do 15 reps consistently on the first set. When the number of reps exceeds that, gains in strength and muscle size come very slowly. And, increasing muscle size and strength results in a higher metabolism rate which expedites losing weight.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 27, 2012 6:53 AM GMT
    countrycityboy saidI want to lose about 50 pounds, but I'm afraid that lifting weights is going to make that difficult, since I feel like I'll probably gain more weight if I pack on muscle, when I know I need to lose a significant amount. Is weight lifting needed in order to lose weight (aside from a healthy diet)?


    Don't get focused on a number. If your'e gaining muscle mass and losing fat, how could that possibly be a bad thing?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 27, 2012 6:57 AM GMT
    50 lbs.??? That's nothing! Try starvation, that usually tends to work pretty well. icon_twisted.gificon_wink.gif
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jul 27, 2012 6:17 PM GMT
    JulesVerne said50 lbs.??? That's nothing! Try starvation, that usually tends to work pretty well. icon_twisted.gificon_wink.gif


    Years ago, when I weighed just a few pounds more than I thought I should, I stopped eating on Sundays and ate on only six days per week; it worked.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Jul 27, 2012 6:29 PM GMT
    JulesVerne said50 lbs.??? That's nothing! Try starvation, that usually tends to work pretty well. icon_twisted.gificon_wink.gif


    Not as well as amputation. If the number on the scale is really your most important measure of fitness, then amputation is a great option: it's fast, it's painless (with good anesthesia), and it's permanent. You could wake up tomorrow 60 pounds lighter if they take a leg.

    Or, you could find a better way to assess your own fitness. Your call.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 27, 2012 6:50 PM GMT
    Strong and lean are NOT exclusive. If you train both cardio and strength in the same workout, always do strength training first as your body's growth hormones will be elevated for only the first 45 minutes or so of any workout. Better, use a strength training workout in which your heart rate elevates and remains elevated throughout the workout -- that way you can have your cake and eat it too.
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    Jul 27, 2012 7:50 PM GMT
    stop fussing about lbs. If you want numbers go for waist measurement, calves and biceps...

    Or something. ANYTHING is better than the "I must weigh 154lb or I´m fat" mentality.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2012 4:57 AM GMT
    GonzoTheGreat saidstop fussing about lbs. If you want numbers go for waist measurement, calves and biceps...

    Or something. ANYTHING is better than the "I must weigh 154lb or I´m fat" mentality.


    Yeah, but even if it's muscle or whatever, being barely 5'9" and 230 pounds like I am now is not healthy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2012 10:41 AM GMT
    I lost 50+ pounds just weightlifting.