Can Compact Fluorescent Lightbulbs Damage Skin?

  • metta

    Posts: 39099

    Jul 28, 2012 8:20 AM GMT
    Can Compact Fluorescent Lightbulbs Damage Skin?


    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-compact-fluorescent-lightbulbs-damage-skin&WT.mc_id=SA_DD_20120725
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    Jul 29, 2012 1:45 AM GMT
    perfect time to switch to LEDS!!! yay!
  • Litmop

    Posts: 78

    Jul 29, 2012 2:03 AM GMT
    Sure...if someone stabs you with it.
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    Jul 29, 2012 2:19 AM GMT
    Well, their testing method is valid.

    Fortunately, LCD displays and laptops can block any UV light leakage from older cold-cathode backlighting (weird fluorescent tubes.)

    Most halogen fixtures have a filter plate that is supposed to cover the reflector assembly to block UV rays as well.

    Ultimately, UV is easily blocked with the right filter.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 29, 2012 3:28 AM GMT
    Ah, horrifying. These things are bad news for many reasons. I'm getting rid of them in my house.icon_mad.gif
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    Jul 29, 2012 6:23 AM GMT
    RobertF64 saidWell, their testing method is valid.

    Fortunately, LCD displays and laptops can block any UV light leakage from older cold-cathode backlighting (weird fluorescent tubes.)

    Most halogen fixtures have a filter plate that is supposed to cover the reflector assembly to block UV rays as well.

    Ultimately, UV is easily blocked with the right filter.


    Absolutely - and lots of us already have filters in place, whether we know it or not.

    If you have a fixture where the lamp is visible; then you would be at greater risk, if your lamp is behind glass, or a lamp-shade, or recessed in a down-light then the risk becomes very low.
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    Jul 29, 2012 6:34 AM GMT
    banner-2-bulbs.jpg

    Just showed up on one of the ads as I read this thread.. icon_confused.gif
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    Jul 29, 2012 6:38 AM GMT
    CFLs are a pain anyway. I can't wait until the LEDs become better and more practical.
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    Jul 29, 2012 6:52 AM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidAnd cheaper! Dang, they are pricey as shit.


    I was including price in the "practical" category. It's impractical to spend that much on a bulb. icon_smile.gif
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 29, 2012 5:25 PM GMT
    My bf and I removed the cfls in our house today, and we noticed two of them had the kind if damage on them that causes UV rays to leak. I read a few other online articles and one said that even the non damaged ones shouldn't be left on for over an hour.

    One "bright" spot is that we used up some old incandescent bulbs we had lying around and the lighting is soooo much better. Takes about five years off, lol.
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    Jul 29, 2012 5:31 PM GMT
    MuchoMasQueMusculo said
    RobertF64 said
    Ultimately, UV is easily blocked with the right filter.


    ^ This is what we need to do, find ways to filter the light and hopefully we should be fine test the results.
    Fixed icon_wink.gif
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Jul 29, 2012 5:44 PM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    MuchoMasQueMusculo saidAnd cheaper! Dang, they are pricey as shit.


    I was including price in the "practical" category. It's impractical to spend that much on a bulb. icon_smile.gif


    Not when you factor in their lifespan. 20-plus years from a single bulb?
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    Jul 29, 2012 5:46 PM GMT
    Good job I wear sunscreen even when I'm indoors.

    People look at me like I'm nuts but who's crazy now motherfuckers ??!!!!! icon_lol.gif
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    Jul 29, 2012 6:50 PM GMT
    I'm not so quick to jump on the DOWN WITH CFL bandwagon. For all we know, a year in a room with a CFL might be less dangerous than 10 minutes in the sun without sunscreen.

    What I will take from the article is to not use bulbs that have the outer coating chipped, or else use them behind a filter/covering.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 29, 2012 8:23 PM GMT
    whateveryo saidGood job I wear sunscreen even when I'm indoors.

    People look at me like I'm nuts but who's crazy now motherfuckers ??!!!!! icon_lol.gif


    According to this article, a chemical found in sunscreen enhances the damage caused by cfl lights.
    http://dailycaller.com/2012/07/23/energy-efficient-cfl-bulbs-cause-skin-damage-say-researchers/
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    Jul 29, 2012 8:33 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    whateveryo saidGood job I wear sunscreen even when I'm indoors.

    People look at me like I'm nuts but who's crazy now motherfuckers ??!!!!! icon_lol.gif


    According to this article, a chemical found in sunscreen enhances the damage caused by cfl lights.
    http://dailycaller.com/2012/07/23/energy-efficient-cfl-bulbs-cause-skin-damage-say-researchers/


    Luckily most modern sunblocks have a number of different chemical/physical filters but still that's scary stuff !
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 30, 2012 4:43 PM GMT
    After 24 hours of having a cfl-free house, I have to say that my mood has actually been much improved, everything looks so much nicer and cleaner in a less harsh light, and most of all I feel like there is one less danger lurking in my home.icon_biggrin.gif
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Jul 30, 2012 4:45 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidAfter 24 hours of having a cfl-free house, I have to say that my mood has actually been much improved, everything looks so much nicer and cleaner in a less harsh light, and most of all I feel like there is one less danger lurking in my home.icon_biggrin.gif


    Of course, now your electrical bills will be much higher; and you'll need to find a source for regular incandescent bulbs (as they're being phased out in North America).
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 30, 2012 5:19 PM GMT
    jim_stl said
    HottJoe saidAfter 24 hours of having a cfl-free house, I have to say that my mood has actually been much improved, everything looks so much nicer and cleaner in a less harsh light, and most of all I feel like there is one less danger lurking in my home.icon_biggrin.gif


    Of course, now your electrical bills will be much higher; and you'll need to find a source for regular incandescent bulbs (as they're being phased out in North America).


    I know, we'll probably have to switch to LED soon enough. We just used bulbs we already had on hand.

    I don't know why anyone would defend a toxic light bulbs, though. They cause cancer, contain mercury, and studies have showen that they even have ill-affects on psychological well-being. Seems foolish for anyone to stand by them.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Jul 30, 2012 5:33 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    jim_stl said
    HottJoe saidAfter 24 hours of having a cfl-free house, I have to say that my mood has actually been much improved, everything looks so much nicer and cleaner in a less harsh light, and most of all I feel like there is one less danger lurking in my home.icon_biggrin.gif


    Of course, now your electrical bills will be much higher; and you'll need to find a source for regular incandescent bulbs (as they're being phased out in North America).


    I know, we'll probably have to switch to LED soon enough. We just used bulbs we already had on hand.

    I don't know why anyone would defend a toxic light bulbs, though. They cause cancer, contain mercury, and studies have showen that they even have ill-affects on psychological well-being. Seems foolish for anyone to stand by them.


    But the coal burned in power plants often contains trace levels of mercury, which is released into the atmosphere. Since incandescent bulbs require four times the electricity as CFLs, incandescent bulbs produce much more mercury pollution than shattered CFLs. And the demoralizing flicker of many fluorescent bulbs is eliminated with electronic ballasts, which are also more efficient than old-school magnetic ballasts.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 30, 2012 5:44 PM GMT
    jim_stl said
    HottJoe said
    jim_stl said
    HottJoe saidAfter 24 hours of having a cfl-free house, I have to say that my mood has actually been much improved, everything looks so much nicer and cleaner in a less harsh light, and most of all I feel like there is one less danger lurking in my home.icon_biggrin.gif


    Of course, now your electrical bills will be much higher; and you'll need to find a source for regular incandescent bulbs (as they're being phased out in North America).


    I know, we'll probably have to switch to LED soon enough. We just used bulbs we already had on hand.

    I don't know why anyone would defend a toxic light bulbs, though. They cause cancer, contain mercury, and studies have showen that they even have ill-affects on psychological well-being. Seems foolish for anyone to stand by them.


    But the coal burned in power plants often contains trace levels of mercury, which is released into the atmosphere. Since incandescent bulbs require four times the electricity as CFLs, incandescent bulbs produce much more mercury pollution than shattered CFLs. And the demoralizing flicker of many fluorescent bulbs is eliminated with electronic ballasts, which are also more efficient than old-school magnetic ballasts.


    I'll buy LED lights next time I'm lightbulb shopping.... When my bf and I removed our cfl bulbs we noticed some were damaged. If you have them in your house, at the very least you should inspect them for damage, or you risk putting your health at risk. The dangers are undeniable.

    Nothing is perfectly clean (yet) but I think cfl's are the worst of all the evils.
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    Jul 30, 2012 5:57 PM GMT
    I don't stand by them, don't particularly like them, but until led improves & their costs come down, I'll use them. There's a big difference in the quality of light in the variety of compacts sold. The one labeled daylight completely sucks, way too harsh. The soft is too soft so I do the bright indoor white or whatever its called.

    I've got two table lamps with them behind shades but those lamps are rarely used anyway. I've got them in all the ceiling lights but each room has an inverted faux-tiffany shade so that the stained glass (or one which is agate) is between the bulb and skin. Also I picked a sconce facing up so that the bulb is completely behind a very thick, colored glass. The ceilings are all white so all of the light in the room is not direct, but either reflected or filtered.

    Some for instances:

    Kitchen
    Quoizel-Hyacinth-Tiffany-Close-to-Ceilin

    Den
    TFAV1714VB.jpg

    Living Room
    TFFS1716VB.jpg

    Bathroom
    27393_3.jpg

    Dining Room (Okay, this one was a mistake lol. I wanted a splash of color and it looked interesting online but when installed and lit it up I see now that it is horrible. But I'm keeping it as a joke. I tell guests it's an Early American Gaudy. From the Hideous Collection)
    349701712CTC.jpg
    The compacts actually work much better than the old bulbs in these types of lamps because I'm able to increase the lighting, say, put in 100s instead of the called-for 60s, without increasing the heat which better lights up the stained glass and puts more light reflecting up over the lamp. Between the brighter lights and the reflective ceiling, the stained glass does not at all impede the effectiveness of the lamps.

    Without the compacts, if I still wanted these lamps on the ceiling, I'd have to augment them with additional lighting.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 30, 2012 6:22 PM GMT
    Wow, we have the same taste! I have Tiffany-style lamps in all the rooms of my house (my house was built in 1927, so they fit perfectly.) It's true that you can get them brighter with CFL lights. Nevertheless, I think anyone who grew up with incandescent lightbulbs would feel nostalgic if they tried them again. My memory must be short, because I'd forgotten how different they make a room feel. The lighting is just so much softer and gentler. It really does make a world of difference. I just hope when the new LEDs come out they don't make me too depressed, lol.
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    Jul 30, 2012 7:49 PM GMT
    I love old houses too and yes, the lamps must fit in perfectly there. I've always enjoyed stained glass lamps and sort of require them because I'm not into coloring walls. I whitewash so the lamps are a splash of color. I'm also not into hanging lots of stuff on walls and I'm not into knickknacks collecting dust so I view the lamps as functional art and often have some on even during the day when the light isn't required for the room but only to light up the lamp itself.

    As to lighting, I noticed that as my mom aged, she lit up the inside and outside of her house like an airport runway, visible from space. Now I'm starting to prefer it lighter too. But it's really not all that bright yet and the stained glass prevents glare. But for few reading lamps, most rooms have only the one ceiling fixture.
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    Jul 30, 2012 11:48 PM GMT
    GordonLee90232 saidI think those light bulbs are very bad because they contain mercury and now if every one is going to have to use those flourescent bulbs that means that there will be a lot more mercury that will be in the environment and that is not going to be very good at all for the environment.
    When these bulbs are spent, you take them to an e-waste facility to have them properly recycled. Haven't you been doing that??

    Fluorescent tubes (long ones) have quiiite a bit more mercury in them, and they've been used for a long time, and are still being used. No one has cares about them environmentally.

    I think declaring war over CFLs is an unwise choice in battles, as it will mostly likely make no difference. And in terms of "feeling good". Light therapy devices, used to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (winter blues), are made with compact fluorescent light, not incandescent or LED.