Workout and nutrition plan for a skinny guy

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 03, 2012 12:12 AM GMT
    Hey guys! Thanks for reading this if you do.
    Here is my issue. I'm in great shape. I run, I do strength training, and I'm pretty active (kayaking, etc).
    However, I've gotten serious about the gym in the last 2-3 years. I go 5 days/week, sometimes 6, and I do strength training and cardio when I go daily. I've cut back on my cardio so that I don't lose what I gain in muscle mass. I eat great, and I've been adding more protein to my diet, including protein shakes, bars, jerky, etc. However, I'm still thin. I have definition for sure, but I am not gaining mass. I don't want to be a body builder, but I need something tailored to my body and my needs, so I didn't know any better place to ask for advice and routines/plans than here!

    Basically, I need a workout routine/meal plan that will help me gain muscle mass without just gaining weight, ie getting fat. I'm 27, 5 9, 135lbs. I switch up my routines constantly and I increase my weight weekly. Help!
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    Aug 03, 2012 12:20 AM GMT
    Skinny guys complaining about how much tasty stuff they have to eat to get bigger make us formerly-fat people mad because that's the same stuff we had to stop eating to get smaller.
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Aug 03, 2012 1:35 AM GMT
    I just started to workout almost everyday. I'm thin too. My goal is 15-20lbs of muscle. I'll need a trainer or a workout buddy for motivation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 03, 2012 1:58 AM GMT
    You're an ectomorph, so to see more gains you should cut down to 3 times a week in the gym, and limit workouts to 30-45mins max. Right now you're probably over training based on what you stated. Diet is also incredibly important, and even more so if you are doing less to gain more (which you should!) All the best with it.
  • d694485

    Posts: 222

    Aug 03, 2012 2:08 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidSkinny guys complaining about how much tasty stuff they have to eat to get bigger make us formerly-fat people mad because that's the same stuff we had to stop eating to get smaller.


    Eating a lot is surprisingly difficult and it's not like we should be eating "tasty stuff" either. icon_sad.gif
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    Aug 03, 2012 3:42 AM GMT
    d694485 said
    paulflexes saidSkinny guys complaining about how much tasty stuff they have to eat to get bigger make us formerly-fat people mad because that's the same stuff we had to stop eating to get smaller.


    Eating a lot is surprisingly difficult and it's not like we should be eating "tasty stuff" either. icon_sad.gif
    It's not nearly as difficult as having to reduce what you eat. I love bulking weeks because I get to pig out; but cutting takes a lot of discipline. The naturally thin guys don't have to worry about the cutting. And that make life not fair. icon_sad.gif
  • d694485

    Posts: 222

    Aug 03, 2012 4:14 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    d694485 said
    paulflexes saidSkinny guys complaining about how much tasty stuff they have to eat to get bigger make us formerly-fat people mad because that's the same stuff we had to stop eating to get smaller.


    Eating a lot is surprisingly difficult and it's not like we should be eating "tasty stuff" either. icon_sad.gif
    It's not nearly as difficult as having to reduce what you eat. I love bulking weeks because I get to pig out; but cutting takes a lot of discipline. The naturally thin guys don't have to worry about the cutting. And that make life not fair. icon_sad.gif


    As much as I love to pig out, I actually miss not having to make myself eat a lot. It sounds strange, but maybe it just as easy for me to not eat enough as it is for you to overeat. (plus some certain people in my family continuously nag at how eating so much is making my skin worse, argh.)
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    Aug 03, 2012 4:16 AM GMT
    I'm an ectomorph, too, and I get the similar negative responses about it. (Look at the Captain America movie when he kept getting negative remarks about being skinny for the first whole 15 minutes of the movie, and now think about someone who gets those remarks their whole life.) It's completely unrealistic to be angry at someone for being born with a different body type. And here's why; it is just as difficult for both ectomorphs and endomorphs to reach their health goals, and it's no help at all to say negative things like "stop complaining" "I hate people like you," "you'll never be built," I've heard it all. Some people are born with genes that support more tissue growth, and some people aren't, but it just means you have to work at it a little harder. All kinds of other types of factors contribute to it, too, like how active you are, etc. The reality is that an ecto's eating habits actually really are very different than an endo's.

    For ectomorphs (small-framed people), it's actually very hard to eat enough nutrition to maintain a healthy weight. My digestive system is small (inside my birdcage of a chest, and there's only so much food that can fit in there, come on, that's simple logic and nothing to get irrate at someone about). I get full very fast on small meals, and I don't get hungry as often. When I'm not exercising regularly which gives me more of an appetite, it's very easy for me to dip too close to the dangerously mal-nutrition side, almost anorexic.

    I've actually gotten all kinds of advice over the years, and here's something that kinda surprised me. I struck up a conversation with a very built guy (about 5'10") at my friendly neighborhood bar. I mentioned that I was tracking my nutrition on an app called myfitnesspal and it was hard for me to meet my goal of 2,200 calories a day (as well as the daily amounts of vitamins). He then suggested because I was so active, that I should increase my calories even more than that. He mentioned to me the Michael Phelps olympic champion swimmer example, who eats 12,000 compared to my struggling 2,200. My hunky friend showed me pics of himself when he was body-building very hard when he was eating 7,000 calories a day.
    Now, these amounts are very extreme, so it's really better to at least see a nutritionist at least once, to get some accurate measures of your metabolism, and get some suggestions on nutritional meals.
    I've also tried the Meal Plans here on realjock.com http://www.realjock.com/nutrition/1082. It's a great plan, but I noticed that it can be a little expensive going back to the supermarket often, so I just pick one day of that plan, one that I like, and stock up on those items, and just keep repeating it.

    Anyways, good luck with your fitness goals, if you get discouraged, the trick is to stay consistently motivated. Just stick with it, and be very persistent keeping on track every day. Talk to others very often who are going through the same thing that you are. Feel free to message me, because I'm going through the same thing you are.


  • d694485

    Posts: 222

    Aug 03, 2012 4:19 AM GMT
    FlyGuyAFga saidI'm an ectomorph, too, and I get the similar negative responses about it. (Look at the Captain America movie when he kept getting negative remarks about being skinny for the first whole 15 minutes of the movie, and now think about someone who gets those remarks their whole life.) It's completely unrealistic to be angry at someone for being born with a different body type. And here's why; it is just as difficult for both ectomorphs and endomorphs to reach their health goals, and it's no help at all to say negative things like "stop complaining" and "I hate people like you," I've heard it all. Some people are born with genes that support more tissue growth, and some people aren't. All kinds of other types of factors contribute to it, too, like how active you are, etc. The reality is that an ecto's eating habits actually really are very different than an endo's.

    For ectomorphs (small-framed people), it's actually very hard to eat enough nutrition to maintain a healthy weight. My digestive system is small (inside my birdcage of a chest, and there's only so much food that can fit in there, come on, that's simple logic). I get full very fast on small meals, and I don't get hungry as often. When I'm not exercising regularly which gives me more of an appetite, it's very easy for me to dip too close to the dangerously mal-nutrition side, almost anorexic.

    I've actually gotten all kinds of advice over the years, and here's something that kinda surprised me. I struck up a conversation with a very built guy (about 5'10") at my friendly neighborhood bar. I mentioned that I was tracking my nutrition on an app called myfitnesspal and it was hard for me to meet my goal of 2,200 calories a day (as well as the daily amounts of vitamins). He then suggested because I was so active, that I should increase my calories even more than that. He mentioned to me the Michael Phelps olympic champion swimmer example, who eats 12,000 compared to my struggling 2,200. My hunky friend showed me pics of himself when he was body-building very hard when he was eating 7,000 calories a day.
    Now, these amounts are very extreme, so it's really better to at least see a nutritionist at least once, to get some accurate measures of your metabolism, and get some suggestions on nutritional meals.
    I've also tried the Meal Plans here on realjock.com. I noticed that it gets expensive and takes a lot of time going to the supermarket often, so I just pick one day of that plan and just keep repeating it.

    Anyways, good luck with your fitness goals, if you get discouraged, the trick is to stay consistently motivated. Just stick with it, and be very persistent keeping on track every day. Talk to others very often who are going through the same thing that you are. Feel free to message me, because I'm going through the same thing you are.




    I really feel for you. I've got a whole bunch of physical, psychological problems that are totally against me eating enough to gain weight.
  • GDBC

    Posts: 2

    Sep 10, 2012 3:45 AM GMT
    It could be that you're over working your muscles. Rest is one of the most important things for your body after a good workout. Unless if you're an expert body builder if you're working a muscle group more than twice a week (unless if you're doing a full body split workout then it can be three) than you're working them too hard. Sleep is also really important for muscles to recover and grow (it's during sleep that the chemicals that stimulate muscle growth are released so its important to get a good 9 or 10 hours in).

    I had a similar problem. I used to spend hours doing push-ups (didn't have a gym at the time..) about four days a week and then getting very little sleep afterwards. I was really peeved that I wasn't seeing major improvements a month in but that combination of working out a muscle group too often and not getting enough sleep really kept me from getting better results.