The U.S. economy added more jobs in July, but the unemployment rate ticked up to 8.3 percent, the Labor Department reported.

The monthly jobs figures released on Friday offered both good and bad news.

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A detailed look at the unemployment and jobs situation.

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On the one hand, payrolls expanded by 163,000 people, a promising rise after three straight months of disappointing job gains. Jobs in manufacturing rose by 25,000; there were 9,000 fewer jobs in government.

“It would appear that the slow patch we’ve had since April is over,” Gus Faucher, senior macro economist at PNC Financial Services Group, said before the release of the numbers.

But the rate of unemployment nevertheless rose from 8.2 percent to 8.3 percent. It was a small enough difference in the rate that the Labor Department called it “essentially unchanged,” but more Americans are looking for work. The jobless rate has been above 8 percent since February 2009.

“It just looks like we’re moving sideways,” said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist for Capital Economics.

In remarks on Friday afternoon, President Obama noted that the economy has added private sector jobs for 29 straight months, for a total of 4.5 million jobs.

LETS REMEMBER THAT EVEN THESE LOW NUMBERS ARE AN IMPROVEMENT OVER 8 YEARS OF BUSH AND HIS TAX CUTS TO CREATE JOBS. Yet the repubs still can't quit singing the same old tax song knowing full well that their policies DID NOT CREATE JOBS, BUT OBAMA'S DID, IN SPITE OF EVERYTHING REPUBS COULD BLOCK THAT WOULD HAVE INCREASED JOB CREATION>