When 1,099 felons vote in race won by 312 ballots

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    Aug 07, 2012 1:59 PM GMT
    Of course, to hear it from Democrats, not only is voter ID unnecessary, voter fraud doesn't happen.

    http://washingtonexaminer.com/york-when-1099-felons-vote-in-race-won-by-312-ballots/article/2504163

    In the eyes of the Obama administration, most Democratic lawmakers, and left-leaning editorial pages across the country, voter fraud is a problem that doesn't exist. Allegations of fraud, they say, are little more than pretexts conjured up by Republicans to justify voter ID laws designed to suppress Democratic turnout.

    That argument becomes much harder to make after reading a discussion of the 2008 Minnesota Senate race in "Who's Counting?", a new book by conservative journalist John Fund and former Bush Justice Department official Hans von Spakovsky. Although the authors cover the whole range of voter fraud issues, their chapter on Minnesota is enough to convince any skeptic that there are times when voter fraud not only exists but can be critical to the outcome of a critical race.

    In the '08 campaign, Republican Sen. Norm Coleman was running for re-election against Democrat Al Franken. It was impossibly close; on the morning after the election, after 2.9 million people had voted, Coleman led Franken by 725 votes.

    Franken and his Democratic allies dispatched an army of lawyers to challenge the results. After the first canvass, Coleman's lead was down to 206 votes. That was followed by months of wrangling and litigation. In the end, Franken was declared the winner by 312 votes. He was sworn into office in July 2009, eight months after the election.

    During the controversy a conservative group called Minnesota Majority began to look into claims of voter fraud. Comparing criminal records with voting rolls, the group identified 1,099 felons -- all ineligible to vote -- who had voted in the Franken-Coleman race.

    Minnesota Majority took the information to prosecutors across the state, many of whom showed no interest in pursuing it. But Minnesota law requires authorities to investigate such leads. And so far, Fund and von Spakovsky report, 177 people have been convicted -- not just accused, but convicted -- of voting fraudulently in the Senate race. Another 66 are awaiting trial. "The numbers aren't greater," the authors say, "because the standard for convicting someone of voter fraud in Minnesota is that they must have been both ineligible, and 'knowingly' voted unlawfully." The accused can get off by claiming not to have known they did anything wrong.

    Still, that's a total of 243 people either convicted of voter fraud or awaiting trial in an election that was decided by 312 votes. With 1,099 examples identified by Minnesota Majority, and with evidence suggesting that felons, when they do vote, strongly favor Democrats, it doesn't require a leap to suggest there might one day be proof that Al Franken was elected on the strength of voter fraud.
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    Aug 07, 2012 9:26 PM GMT
    A) This isn't voter fraud of the kind ID laws are alleged to prevent. icon_rolleyes.gif

    B) Preventing citizens, particularly those who have served whatever sentence they received for their crime, from voting is unconstitutional. icon_cool.gif
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    Aug 07, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    Does having a felony conviction preclude one from voting in the U.S.?

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    Aug 07, 2012 10:03 PM GMT
    Upper_Cdn saidDoes having a felony conviction preclude one from voting in the U.S.?

    Some states yes, others no. It also varies by state how long a felon is disenfranchised from voting.
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    Aug 07, 2012 10:25 PM GMT
    Iceblink said
    Upper_Cdn saidDoes having a felony conviction preclude one from voting in the U.S.?

    Some states yes, others no. It also varies by state how long a felon is disenfranchised from voting.


    Interesting.

    In Canada, , felons vote.

    The Canadian Supreme Court ruled that:

    "the government offered no credible theory about why it should be allowed to deny a fundamental democratic right as a form of state punishment. Denying the right to vote does not comply with the requirements for legitimate punishment — namely, that punishment must not be arbitrary and must serve a valid criminal law purpose. Absence of arbitrariness requires that punishment be tailored to the acts and circumstances of the individual offender. Section 51(e) qua punishment bears little relation to the offender’s particular crime. As to a legitimate penal purpose, neither the record nor common sense supports the claim that disenfranchisement deters crime or rehabilitates criminals. By imposing a blanket punishment on all penitentiary inmates regardless of the particular crimes they committed, the harm they caused, or the normative character of their conduct, s. 51(e) does not meet the requirements of denunciatory, retributive punishment, and is not rationally connected to the government’s stated goal."

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    Aug 07, 2012 10:36 PM GMT
    Upper_Cdn said
    Iceblink said
    Upper_Cdn saidDoes having a felony conviction preclude one from voting in the U.S.?

    Some states yes, others no. It also varies by state how long a felon is disenfranchised from voting.


    Interesting.

    It has no relevance to your eligibility to vote in Canada (but it disqualifies you from public office, without a royal pardon.)

    In my state of Michigan, felons are only banned from voting while imprisoned.
    http://felonvoting.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=286
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    Aug 07, 2012 10:44 PM GMT
    I am still looking for what ElectionsCanada does for incarcerated people