Kitchen Nano Garden helps you add a bit of green to your urban living space

  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    Aug 07, 2012 6:44 PM GMT
    Kitchen Nano Garden helps you add a bit of green to your urban living space

    I want one! icon_smile.gif


    Nano-Garden-1.jpg

    http://www.gizmodiva.com/home_improvement/kitchen-nano-garden-helps-you-add-a-bit-of-green-to-your-urban-living-space.php
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    Aug 07, 2012 7:25 PM GMT

    That one is not available for purchase yet, but if you want one now, this one is available. The one in the video is a commercial unit, which I'm seriously considering buying.
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Aug 07, 2012 11:51 PM GMT
    Looks like fun but damn, that requires a big-ass kitchen! That thing would barely fit in my apartment living room! Hahah
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    Aug 07, 2012 11:54 PM GMT
    if u can afford to buy it, u could also afford to buy veggies... LOL... a lot of them!!
  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    Aug 08, 2012 12:01 AM GMT
    ^
    i get tired of looking for quality produce in the stores...so many times...they just look like they have been sitting too long. Freshly cut veggies would be totally worth it...probably increasing vitamins as well. I could grow them focusing on quality rather than maximizing profits that the store does. icon_smile.gif


    GWriter saidLooks like fun but damn, that requires a big-ass kitchen! That thing would barely fit in my apartment living room! Hahah


    ^
    I was trying to figure out where I could put it as well. I think I found a good place but I would have to tear through a wall, building a closet like space, using garage space to do it.


    I have been wanting to put them in my garden but this seems so much better...no bugs...the wildlife in my yard wont eat it all, the water does not get evaporated by the sun, etc. It would be like those greenhouse tomatoes....higher quality results.
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    Aug 08, 2012 12:04 AM GMT
    hairyandym saidif u can afford to buy it, u could also afford to buy veggies... LOL... a lot of them!!


    I was thinking that plus the idea of it being ecologically friendly. Right, Like it doesn't cost the environment to manufacture & maintain those units when pretty much the same product is being delivered for your neighbors at the local grocery store.

    It looks like a fun gimmick if you don't have a garden but probably a chia pet takes up less room.

    obama-chia-pet.jpg
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    Aug 08, 2012 3:25 AM GMT
    hairyandym saidif u can afford to buy it, u could also afford to buy veggies... LOL... a lot of them!!


    ....and lots of pesticides and chemicals.
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    Aug 08, 2012 3:27 AM GMT
    theantijock said Right, Like it doesn't cost the environment to manufacture & maintain those units when pretty much the same product is being delivered for your neighbors at the local grocery store.


    You don't actually think it uses anywhere near the same amount of energy it costs to ship all that produce across the U.S. now do you?
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    Aug 08, 2012 3:28 AM GMT
    GWriter saidLooks like fun but damn, that requires a big-ass


    The absolute exact words that went through my mind when I saw that were "I'd need a big ass kitchen for that".
  • camfer

    Posts: 891

    Aug 08, 2012 3:38 AM GMT
    It's a product in search of a market.

    If you want to grow some food in your kitchen, great. Go to the hardware store and buy some cheap shop lights for $12. Buy some cool white bulbs. Buy a timer and run the lights 18 hours a day. Suspend them 12" above some nursery flats and drop some seeds in moist potting soil. Fertilize every 2 weeks. Eat the food in 6 weeks.

    And no, that is not the same as buying produce from the supermarket. Anything just picked and home grown has much more nutrition.
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    Aug 08, 2012 3:39 AM GMT
    I wonder what "other" things it can grow. icon_twisted.gif
  • wander2340

    Posts: 176

    Aug 08, 2012 3:52 AM GMT
    They have a smaller unit available for residential use. However, at $2,200 it is a little hard to justify. It would be cool though.

    http://www.urbancultivator.net/kitchen-cultivator/
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    Aug 08, 2012 4:27 AM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    theantijock said Right, Like it doesn't cost the environment to manufacture & maintain those units when pretty much the same product is being delivered for your neighbors at the local grocery store.


    You don't actually think it uses anywhere near the same amount of energy it costs to ship all that produce across the U.S. now do you?


    You don't actually think it takes zero resources in the first place to manufacture the thing, ship it, manufacture the bug free dirt, ship that too, manufacture the lighting, ship that, etc. etc. now do you?

    Meanwhile, I already covered your point by noting that the pretty much all the same herbs you'll be growing are already being shipped for your neighbors' consumption.

    So if we want to get down to it, I suppose we could add the 20 packages of fresh herbs someone might purchase in a year, weight them, figure out how much fuel that adds to the 18-wheeler already shipping a grocery store's worth of produce to the market every week. Subtract the fuel we don't use to drive to the store for what we won't be growing, since, after all, we either bike it or live within walking distance to the store. But add the extra trips to Home Depot for the fertilizers and lamps as they go out and I'm guessing it needs distilled water ta'boot.

    Or, we can really indulge our consumerism which rarely saves energy and just buy a chichichichichichichichia.

    But it looks very pretty and that child is just precious.
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    Aug 08, 2012 4:29 AM GMT
    Shut_up_and_take_my_money.jpg
  • camfer

    Posts: 891

    Aug 08, 2012 4:31 AM GMT
    Here's my $30 version in operation. Those are pea shoots.

    15eebg3.jpg
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    Aug 08, 2012 4:55 AM GMT
    Some of you guys must have a lot of spare time on your hands to grow your own food. And you'd need several of those to be able to provide you with a continuous supply of food.
  • camfer

    Posts: 891

    Aug 08, 2012 5:17 AM GMT
    Or else we grow food for a living, and have no spare time at all!

    If you wanted to harvest a flat a week, you'd need space for 5 - 8 flats.
  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    Aug 08, 2012 6:01 AM GMT
    wander2340 saidThey have a smaller unit available for residential use. However, at $2,200 it is a little hard to justify. It would be cool though.

    http://www.urbancultivator.net/kitchen-cultivator/



    The top unit, which is much larger, is made by Hyundai. I'm hoping that it does not cost too much.

    I could see paying what you pay around what you pay for a good refrigerator. I do wonder how much it is.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Aug 08, 2012 6:05 AM GMT
    camfer saidHere's my $30 version in operation. Those are pea shoots.

    15eebg3.jpg

    What are you growing there?
  • camfer

    Posts: 891

    Aug 08, 2012 6:08 AM GMT
    Pea shoots are just peas grown to 3 - 6" high and then cut and eaten as greens.
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    Aug 08, 2012 6:08 AM GMT
    camfer saidPea shoots are just peas grown to 3 - 6" high and then cut and eaten as greens.
    I thought pea shoots were photo shoots of peas.
  • camfer

    Posts: 891

    Aug 08, 2012 6:09 AM GMT
    Shoot! Yes, photo shoots of pea shoots!