problem breathing with freestyle

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2012 8:49 PM GMT
    hey, so i am using swimming primarily to aid in the cutting phase of my annual workout rotation, so for cardio. and it therefore needs to be pretty intense to be effective

    i am absolutely loving it and have never found any cardio i like more. i am really getting into working with a swim coach twice a week and am swimming every morning before work about 60-90 mins depending on carb or no carb day.

    my question is, when i am trying to go harder with free/front crawl, i am really struggling not to run out of breath. i am trying 2,3,4 stroke breathing drills ie:breathing every 2 then 3 then 4 per lap. i tried just breathing every 2, which is much more comfortable, but when i get to around 100-200 metres i just cant get enough air in, and my muscles just start to run out of oxygen really fast, thus severely hindering the intensity i can achieve. how do i prevent this happening? better form or just practice? the only thing i can compare it to is doing high altitude training when i was doing my uksf training, that was similair in the sense that the air feels "thinner" and less efeective.

    anyway i know there are some really serious swimmer on RJ so thanks in advance

    luke

    x
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 10, 2012 12:58 AM GMT
    hmm... seems like the problem is you're in water... you can't actually breathe in it. try the backstroke.

    that or just build up the strength. for the record, there's nothing wrong with breathing every two strokes; that's how olympians do it.
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Aug 10, 2012 1:01 AM GMT
    If you haven't swam for a while then its going to be hard. Wait a few weeks.
  • QHCAguy

    Posts: 138

    Aug 10, 2012 2:45 AM GMT
    Agree with NormalGuy. Give it time. Remember when running or cycling or other aerobic exercise, normal respiration rate will climb to something in the ~60 breath/min range. In the water, your stroke will constrain you to breathe at a lower rate (SWAG 40b/min) while you are still exerting hard.

    Calibro is also right, Olympians and lazy, non-swimmer, triathletes like me give up on bilateral breathing and breathe every two strokes. I know I'm not going to win the race in the water so the swim is not the time to start working my muscles into any sort of oxygen deficit. icon_cool.gif Just my 2ยข
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    Aug 10, 2012 2:57 AM GMT
    Was actually reading in Triathlete magazine that breathing any more than every two strokes for lap swimming is over-rated as you're depriving your body of sufficient air to fuel your muscles / workout. I swim regularly (2 miles / day, three times weekly) and breathe every two strokes. Sprint swimmers breath less in order to reduce drag created by rotating the body enough for each breath, but that's likely not what you're looking to do anyway.
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    Aug 10, 2012 7:19 AM GMT
    thanks guys. its always difficult in a new sport to determine what is lack of practice, and what is bad practice.

    thanks again i will just keep swimming lol

    luke

    x
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    Aug 11, 2012 10:34 PM GMT
    I usually find myself first on three. When I've been swimming for a while I wind up automatically breathing every two, at which point I switch sides with each few laps. Don't let breathing every two get you into the habit of favoring breath from just one side.
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    Aug 11, 2012 10:43 PM GMT
    it is perfectly ok to breathe every two strokes. it sounds like you are doing a breathe control set.. breathing every 3, 5, then 7. I will give this to my swimmers to work on stretching their lungs but I don't expect them to be pushing it and never give this during a main set. Also, remember to exhale underwater so that you don't exhale and and inhale all while your mouth is above water. do a slow exhale under the water and a quick breathe out of the water. you need to trick your body into thinking it is constantly breathing in and out and never holding the breathe. that is how us humans breathe normally and makes our body relax more which is key in sufficient swimming.
  • sloughwest

    Posts: 210

    Aug 11, 2012 10:44 PM GMT
    I can only ever breathe from one side, the other side and it's just mouthfuls of water!

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    Aug 11, 2012 11:34 PM GMT
    jprswim said... you need to trick your body into thinking it is constantly breathing in and out and never holding the breathe. that is how us humans breathe normally and makes our body relax more which is key in sufficient swimming.


    This is exactly what I do when I breathe on two. As soon as my mouth is back underwater, I'm already exhaling, breathing just the very same as when I'm not swimming. It feels completely natural.

    sloughwest saidI can only ever breathe from one side, the other side and it's just mouthfuls of water!


    That's funny. You can probably fix that pretty easily.

    Just stand in the pool deep enough so that you can bend your back and put your face in the water. Now breathe normally on the side you usually favor. Roll your head out, take a breath, roll your face into the water, let it out, repeat. Don't swim, just stand there.

    Now do the side that you've trouble coordinating. Again, without swimming. Just stand there with your face in the water and roll your face out of the water on your bad side, breathe, back in the water, exhale, back out, breathe, repeat until you are comfortable on that side.

    Then you can incorporate your stroke while standing there.

    This way you can safely show your mind that your body can breathe on that side too.