Teaching English Abroad

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2012 2:21 AM GMT

    (I wasn't able to find any similar topics on this, but i apologize if it's a repeat.)


    I've been thinking about teaching english abroad lately. Really, it'd simply be an easier way for me to live abroad for a period of time and travel a bit. Has anybody here ever done this or know somebody who has? Stories/Tips?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2012 2:27 AM GMT
    I thought about it too once. Applied, got rejected.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2012 2:43 AM GMT
    I have a family member that wants to do this, anyone know of general qualifications and requirements to do this?
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Aug 13, 2012 2:50 AM GMT
    If you are a native English speaker with a degree from an anglophone university, you are pretty much a shoe-in, especially in countries in Asia. Japan has a more stringent application process than say Korea, China, Vietnam, Thailand, etc. The companies that will hire you will even certify you in TEFL for those countries.

    In Europe, you usually need to have the certification beforehand. There are a zillion companies though that can help you to make it happen. Google them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2012 2:57 AM GMT
    Great idea. I did it France. I found a program at the local university that taught french and I went over on a student visa which allowed me to work about 20 hours per week. While I was over there I was able to find jobs with 3 different language schools. None of them required certification or anything, just the ability to put together lesson plans or follow the plans that they already had (like Berlitz). Now there are the official programs where you have to apply through the French government, but if you are a native English speaker I don't think it will be that difficult to find teaching gigs on your own. Now I wasn't in Paris, so I can't say whether it would be more difficult there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2012 3:14 AM GMT
    There are indeed many English-speaking people coimng to China to teach English , and it is quite wel-paid.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 13, 2012 3:27 AM GMT
    I want to do this in Brazil and Japan for the next few summers.

    I will investigate icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2012 2:03 PM GMT
    Me no speak english
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2012 2:05 PM GMT
    parksandrec91 saidMe no speak english
    tumblr_m76hfpAEpG1rnzbkv.gif
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Aug 17, 2012 2:29 PM GMT
    I taught English abroad for several years at the university level, but I had a Master's degree going in and I spoke the languages of the countries I worked in. I also had prior experience teaching foreign languages (but not English, strangely enough, but I think the combination of those skills plus being a native speaker of English were qualifications enough). I think the basic qualifications probably vary greatly depending on where you will be working.

    I also got some sidebar jobs teaching English to top executives at local companies that had a global presence. Some of those jobs were very well-paid: I charged about the equivalent of $100/hr at those jobs (and this was in the early 1990s).
  • Lanter

    Posts: 149

    Aug 17, 2012 2:40 PM GMT
    I know two people who just left for Japan to teach elementary kids English for 2 years. It's not my thing, but I know people seem to like it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2012 2:46 PM GMT
    I´m currently teaching English in Chile through their government program called Ingles Abre Puertas (English Opens Doors). It´s a new organization, so sometimes they are a little disorganized. But the only thing you pay for is the place ticket. They give you a host family, food, a stippend, health insurance. It´s working out well for me. If you want to find other programs I would check out goabroad.com. It rates programs and verifies that they are legit. But msot want money. This was one of the few that I found that were free.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2012 2:54 PM GMT
    Like @Bunjamon said, its pretty easy especially in Asian countries and i could share first hand experience about China 'cos i live there now. Im currently a student but teach english here part-time.
    Many foreigners come here to teach english and to the best of my knowledege, its pretty easy landing a job even without any qualifications. What they look for are native eglish speakers from the U.S, U.K or Australia.
    Its a great adventure and i'll definitely recommend you give it a try
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 12:19 AM GMT
    minnesota89 saidI´m currently teaching English in Chile through their government program called Ingles Abre Puertas (English Opens Doors). It´s a new organization, so sometimes they are a little disorganized. But the only thing you pay for is the place ticket. They give you a host family, food, a stippend, health insurance. It´s working out well for me. If you want to find other programs I would check out goabroad.com. It rates programs and verifies that they are legit. But msot want money. This was one of the few that I found that were free.


    Will do- grazie! icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 12:19 AM GMT
    Any other helpful websites that you guys know of?
  • NorthChinaLi

    Posts: 241

    Aug 24, 2012 5:30 AM GMT
    make job application through
    shanghai expat
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 5:56 AM GMT
    I am very jealous of native english speakers for that héhé.
    A very sad thing to add. In Japan, Korea or China, if you want to teach English, it will be easier for those who are white. It is a sort of racism that happens here. You have to "look" English or American. A little example : I have been asked many times to teach English. When I answer that English is not my mother tongue, they are like "not a problem, you are white".
    On the opposite, I have an Asian-American friend who desperately tries to find somewhere to teach english, but she is always rejected, and obviously because she is Asian.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 6:02 AM GMT
    Isugemi saidA very sad thing to add. In Japan, Korea or China, if you want to teach English, it will be easier for those who are white. It is a sort of racism that happens here. You have to "look" English or American.

    It's a shame, but true.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 6:05 AM GMT
    How easy it is probably depends on what country you want to be in. I would think it pretty easy in China today - with so many people desparately drying to learn good english. I had a friend do it in Paris for quite a few years, until he got bored of it. I wouild guess that in places where they really want to learn english from a native speaker, one can probably just advertise and get private clients - who would pay a lot more than you would get from a school.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 6:33 AM GMT
    I learned English in an American Language center in Morocco. Most teachers there were American , and a lot of them were very young and only had the basic qualifications.

    You should look for something like that. Besides, the classes were always really fun, cause the teachers were free to be creative, so we often ended up playing silly ( but instructive) games, quizzes. One time , we even made guacamole in class haha.

    Here's the website if you're interested : http://www.alcrabat.org/fr/index.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 2:16 PM GMT
    Davis..if you were my English teacher..i would'nt learn a damm thing!!.. icon_redface.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 2:45 PM GMT
    I spent a year teaching at Berlitz in Tokyo. They had an intake period and two week seminar on site then it was right into work. People i knew either had guarenteed work and low pay (Berlitz) or spotty work and great pay (often at gov or private funded youth schools or domestic corporations). For Tokyo i had to prepare to spend a lot of cash upfront to find a place to rent since there is a custom of gifting money to property owners and realtors that you can't get around.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 2:47 PM GMT
    It sucks.

    Don't do it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2012 2:48 PM GMT
    LIEV saidIt sucks.

    Don't do it.


    How so?

    Recommended alternatives?
  • SomeSiciliano...

    Posts: 543

    Aug 24, 2012 3:16 PM GMT
    I do not have a personal experience but 2 family members who have done it. My baby bro did it for a year in South Korea after getting his TEFL state side. He had experience as a sub teacher in Boston and LA. He went with an agency and was placed in an after school program for six to ten year old kids.

    The upside: he really enjoyed his students. He was impressed that six and seven year old students could diagram sentences, in English, at a level that surpassed most middle school students in the USA. He liked his coworkers allot too...most were Canadian, Australian and Kiwis. Being 30 at the time, he was one of the older expats at the institute. His apartment was modest, but acceptable.
    Downside: many parents,who are paying out of pocket tuition for the program, were demanding to the point of being unreasonable. Any dissatisfaction with their kids progress went straight to the director, and of course the shit rolled downhill to the teaching staff. Also there was not much time off during his contract....a few days here and there...but not enough to explore the continent. He did his Grand Tour of Asia,Australia and New Zealand in the two months after his contract ended.

    Second is my sister in law's brother and his wife. They are in a 'town' in China of about 2 million people. There is no airport...they fly into Guangzhou and take a six hour train ride. Being in a remote area of the PRC they do not have many modern amenities that are available in say, Shanghai. Both have been teaching business English to adults for six years and love it. They are now fluent in two Chinese dialects and will give birth to their first born child in China this October.

    If you want you can pvt me and ill get the name of the organization my bro used. I can also ask my sis in law for contact info for her brother.