Julie Child Turns 100 today!

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    Aug 15, 2012 2:40 PM GMT
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    Julia Child (née McWilliams;[1] August 15, 1912 – August 13, 2004) was an American chef, author, and television personality. She is recognized for bringing French cuisine to the American public with her debut cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and her subsequent television programs, the most notable of which was The French Chef, which premiered in 1963.

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    [b]Childhood and education[/b]

    Child was born Julia Carolyn McWilliams in Pasadena, California, the daughter of John McWilliams, Jr., a Princeton University graduate and prominent land manager, and his wife, the former Julia Carolyn ("Caro") Weston, a paper-company heiress whose father, Byron Curtis Weston, served as lieutenant governor of Massachusetts. The eldest[2] of three children, she had a brother, John III (1914–2002), and a sister, Dorothy Dean (1917–2006).[3]
    Child attended Westridge School, Polytechnic School from fourth grade to ninth grade, then The Katherine Branson School in Ross, California, which was at the time a boarding school. At six feet, two inches (1.88 m) tall, Child played tennis, golf, and basketball as a child and continued to play sports while attending Smith College, from which she graduated in 1934 with a major in English.[1] A press release issued by Smith in 2004 states that her major was history.[4]
    Following her graduation from college, Child moved to New York City, where she worked as a copywriter for the advertising department of upscale home-furnishing firm W. & J. Sloane. Returning to California in 1937, she spent the next four years writing for local publications, working in advertising, and volunteering with the Junior League of Pasadena[5].


    World War II

    Child joined the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) after finding that she was too tall to enlist in the Women's Army Corps (WACs) or in the U.S. Navy's WAVES.[6] She began her OSS career as a typist at its headquarters in Washington, but because of her education and experience soon was given a more responsible position as a top secret researcher working directly for the head of OSS, General William J. Donovan.[7] As a research assistant in the Secret Intelligence division, she typed 10,000 names on white note cards to keep track of officers. For a year, she worked at the OSS Emergency Rescue Equipment Section (ERES) in Washington, D.C. as a file clerk and then as an assistant to developers of a shark repellent needed to ensure that sharks would not explode ordnance targeting German U-boats. In 1944 she was posted to Kandy, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), where her responsibilities included "registering, cataloging and channeling a great volume of highly classified communications" for the OSS's clandestine stations in Asia.[8] She was later posted to China, where she received the Emblem of Meritorious Civilian Service as head of the Registry of the OSS Secretariat.[9] For her service, Child received an award that cited her many virtues, including her "drive and inherent cheerfulness."[7] As with other OSS records, Child's file was declassified in 2008, and, unlike other files, her complete file is available online.[10]
    While in Ceylon, she met Paul Cushing Child, also an OSS employee, and the two were married September 1, 1946 in Lumberville, Pennsylvania,[11] later moving to Washington, D.C. Child, a New Jersey native[12] who had lived in Paris as an artist and poet, was known for his sophisticated palate,[13] and introduced his wife to fine cuisine. He joined the United States Foreign Service and in 1948 the couple moved to Paris when the US State Department assigned Paul there as an exhibits officer with the United States Information Agency.[9] The couple had no children.


    The French Chef and related books
    Main article: The French Chef:


    Julia Child at KUHT:
    A 1962 appearance on a book review show on the National Educational Television (NET) station of Boston, WGBH, led to the inception of her first television cooking show after viewers enjoyed her demonstration of how to cook an omelette. The French Chef had its debut on February 11, 1963, on WGBH and was immediately successful. The show ran nationally for ten years and won Peabody and Emmy Awards, including the first Emmy award for an educational program. Though she was not the first television cook, Child was the most widely seen. She attracted the broadest audience with her cheery enthusiasm, distinctively charming warbly voice, and non-patronizing and unaffected manner. In 1972, The French Chef became the first television program to be captioned for the deaf, albeit in the preliminary technology of open captioning.[17]
    Child's second book, The French Chef Cookbook, was a collection of the recipes she had demonstrated on the show. It was soon followed in 1971 by Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume Two, again in collaboration with Simone Beck, but not with Louisette Bertholle, with whom the professional relationship had ended.[18] Child's fourth book, From Julia Child's Kitchen, was illustrated with her husband's photographs and documented the color series of The French Chef, as well as providing an extensive library of kitchen notes compiled by Child during the course of the show.
    Later career


    Julia Child's kitchen at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.
    In the 1970s and 1980s, she was the star of numerous television programs, including Julia Child & Company, Julia Child & More Company and Dinner at Julia's. For the 1979 book Julia Child and More Company she won a National Book Award in category Current Interest.[19] In 1981 she founded The American Institute of Wine & Food,[20] with vintners Robert Mondavi and Richard Graff, and others, to "advance the understanding, appreciation and quality of wine and food," a pursuit she had already begun with her books and television appearances. In 1989, she published what she considered her magnum opus, a book and instructional video series collectively entitled The Way To Cook.
    Child starred in four more series in the 1990s that featured guest chefs: Cooking with Master Chefs, In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chefs, Baking With Julia, and Julia Child & Jacques Pépin Cooking at Home. She collaborated with Jacques Pépin many times for television programs and cookbooks. All of Child's books during this time stemmed from the television series of the same names.
    Child's use of ingredients like butter and cream has been questioned by food critics and modern-day nutritionists. She addressed these criticisms throughout her career, predicting that a "fanatical fear of food" would take over the country's dining habits, and that focusing too much on nutrition takes the pleasure from enjoying food.[21][22] In a 1990 interview, Child said, "Everybody is overreacting. If fear of food continues, it will be the death of gastronomy in the United States. Fortunately, the French don't suffer from the same hysteria we do. We should enjoy food and have fun. It is one of the simplest and nicest pleasures in life."[23]


    Julia Child's kitchen:
    Julia Child's kitchen, designed by her husband, was the setting for three of her television shows. It is now on display at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Beginning with In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chefs, the Childs' home kitchen in Cambridge was fully transformed into a functional set, with TV-quality lighting, three cameras positioned to catch all angles in the room, and a massive center island with a gas stoveto
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Aug 15, 2012 3:02 PM GMT
    yup, she was the real deal,

    still makes all those posers on the food network and TLC look like the narcissistic media whores they are.

    Jaques Pepin is probably the only other chef who translates to TV in a similar way that she did. simple honest unassuming presentation.

    even Google honors Ms. Child today.
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:04 PM GMT
    thadjock saidyup, she was the real deal,

    still makes all those posers on the food network and TLC look like the narcissistic media whores they are.

    Jaques Pepin is probably the only other chef who translates to TV in a similar way that she did. simple honest unassuming presentation.

    even Google honors Ms. Child today.
    She is amazing! I've been hooked on her since I discovered PBS as a kid! Funny how almost anyone who cites her as a major influence, on television, tends to steer away from the simplicity and no nonsense methods she used.
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:08 PM GMT
    Bon A Petit!
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:09 PM GMT
    Jay1922 saidBon A Petit!
    Winning...
    peop810child.jpg
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:10 PM GMT
    I thought she died of food poisoning years ago!
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:12 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidI thought she died of food poisoning years ago!

    julia.png

    Death and Legacy

    Despite her critics, Julia remained a go-to reference for cooking advice. In 1993, she was rewarded for her work when she became the first woman inducted into the Culinary Institute Hall of Fame. In November 2000, following a 40-year career that has made her name synonymous with fine food and a permanent among the world's most famous chefs, Julia received France's highest honor: the Legion d'Honneur. And in August 2002, the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History unveiled an exhibit featuring the kitchen, where she filmed three of her popular cooking shows.

    Child died in August 2004 of kidney failure at her assisted-living home in Montecito, two days before her 92nd birthday. Child had no intentions of slowing down, even in her final days. "In this line of work...you keep right on till you're through," she said. "Retired people are boring."After her death Child's last book, the autobiographyMy Life in France, was published with the help of Child's great nephew, Alex Prud'homme. The book, which centered on how Child discovered her true calling, became a best seller.
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Aug 15, 2012 3:23 PM GMT
    JR_RJ saidShe is amazing! I've been hooked on her since I discovered PBS as a kid! Funny how almost anyone who cites her as a major influence, on television, tends to steer away from the simplicity and no nonsense methods she used.


    I think her entire success was becasue she was so open and accessible, i'm not a chef, and dont' really even like to cook, but she was complete entertainement to watch, and made you think that you could do that too.

    despite her casual attitude towards techniques, she could butterfly a chicken, the same way a brain surgeon just starts cutting a hole in your head. I was in awe of her complete confidence in the kitchen, and it was all genuine.

    Credit her director/producers for not trying to hype up her shows and make it the circus all of these cooking shows now are. i swear if i saw tyler florence (insert almost any other cooking clown on tv now) on the street i'd punch him in the face just for being such a douche.

    I remember seeing one episode of julia child (maybe her last series, she was very old) where someone thought it would be a good idea to have martha stewart (very early in her media whore career i think) be a guest chef and she was so condescending and didactic towards Julia i just wanted to reach through the screen and strangle her. The contrast between the two women was so stark and while martha was being her usual nuclear know-it-all bitch, Julia just kicked back and let her hang herself, it was priceless.
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:25 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    JR_RJ saidShe is amazing! I've been hooked on her since I discovered PBS as a kid! Funny how almost anyone who cites her as a major influence, on television, tends to steer away from the simplicity and no nonsense methods she used.


    I think her entire success was becasue she was so open and accessible, i'm not a chef, and dont' really even like to cook, but she was complete entertainement to watch, and made you think that you could do that too.

    despite her casual attitude towards techniques, it was obvious she had enormous skill in the kitchen. she could butterfly a chicken, the same way a brain surgeon just starts cutting a hole in your head. I was in awe of her complete confidence in the kitchen, and it was all genuine.

    Credit her director/producers for not trying to hype up her shows and make it the circus all of these cooking shows now are. i swear if i saw tyler florence (insert almost any other cooking clown on tv now) on the street i'd punch him in the face just for being such a douche.

    I remember seeing one episode of julia child (maybe her last series, she was very old) where someone thought it would be a good idea to have martha stewart (very early in her media whore career i think) be a guest chef and she was so condescending and didactic towards Julia i just wanted to reach through the screen and strangle her. The contrast between the two women was so stark and while martha was being her usual nuclear know-it-all bitch, Julia just kicked back and let her hang herself, it was priceless.
    I'll cook you a 5 course dinner with dessert and wine. I'll be ready by 5 pm, unless thats too early. icon_biggrin.gif
  • thadjock

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    Aug 15, 2012 3:29 PM GMT
    JR_RJ saidI'll cook you a 5 course dinner with dessert and wine. I'll be ready by 5 pm, unless thats too early. >


    just don't be offended if i don't know which one is the shrimp fork

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    Aug 15, 2012 3:32 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    JR_RJ saidI'll cook you a 5 course dinner with dessert and wine. I'll be ready by 5 pm, unless thats too early. >


    just don't be offended if i don't know which one is the shrimp fork

    You get the food, but you don't have to deal with formalities if you don't want to. I cook to order, and serve to please. If you were my man, I'd have dinner planned out a whole week ahead, and make most of it from scratch. That is how I show my love in the kitchen.
    No offense to anyone in particular, but I don't do microwave mac n chz and spread my knees for dessert.
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:40 PM GMT
    http://bit.ly/NmnnMA


    The French Chef by y10566
  • thadjock

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    Aug 15, 2012 3:44 PM GMT
    JR_RJ said If you were my man, I'd have dinner planned out a whole week ahead, and make most of it from scratch. That is how I show my love in the kitchen.
    No offense to anyone in particular, but I don't do microwave mac n chz and spread my knees for dessert.


    this ^^ appeals to my lizard brain:

    recent EEG:foodsexsleepfoodsexsleepsexfoodsleepfoodsexsexsleepsexfood

    just dont' tart up the mac'n'cheese with truffles please. you can use $35/lb gruyere
    but no truffles, gastronomically i dont' like ironic class warfare happening in my food.
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:56 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    JR_RJ said If you were my man, I'd have dinner planned out a whole week ahead, and make most of it from scratch. That is how I show my love in the kitchen.
    No offense to anyone in particular, but I don't do microwave mac n chz and spread my knees for dessert.


    this ^^ appeals to my lizard brain:

    recent EEG:foodsexsleepfoodsexsleepsexfoodsleepfoodsexsexsleepsexfood

    just dont' tart up the mac'n'cheese with truffles please. you can use $35/lb gruyere
    but no truffles, gastronomically i dont' like ironic class warfare happening in my food.
    Truffles... they're too trifling! I learn all your likes and dislikes and only push your palette so much at a time. Though, I tend to spice things up once in a while. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:56 PM GMT
    theantijock saidhttp://bit.ly/NmnnMA


    The French Chef by y10566
    Lolo
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    Aug 15, 2012 9:23 PM GMT
  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Aug 15, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    Her rotting worm-filled corpse turns 100 today? Awesome!
  • thadjock

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    Aug 15, 2012 9:39 PM GMT
    TheBizMan saidHer rotting worm-filled corpse turns 100 today? Awesome!


    actually she was cremated at 1200deg. for 6hrs, basted with apricot brandy, placed briefly under the broiler to crisp the skin , tented with foil, let rest for eternity b4 carving.
  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Aug 15, 2012 9:40 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    TheBizMan saidHer rotting worm-filled corpse turns 100 today? Awesome!


    actually she was cremated at 1200deg. for 6hrs, basted with apricot brandy, placed briefly under the broiler to crisp the skin , tented with foil, let rest for eternity b4 carving.

    nom nom nom.. delectable !
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    Aug 15, 2012 10:05 PM GMT
    TheBizMan saidHer rotting worm-filled corpse turns 100 today? Awesome!
    Now, you made that corpse turn! Apologize! Kiss my gritz! icon_mad.gif
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Aug 15, 2012 10:07 PM GMT
    TheBizMan saidnom nom nom.. delectable !


    ur twisted dude

    i luv u
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    Aug 15, 2012 10:14 PM GMT
    thadjock said
    TheBizMan saidHer rotting worm-filled corpse turns 100 today? Awesome!


    actually she was cremated at 1200deg. for 6hrs, basted with apricot brandy, placed briefly under the broiler to crisp the skin , tented with foil, let rest for eternity b4 carving.
    LMAO…nice one!
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    Aug 16, 2012 4:28 AM GMT
    Bump* icon_surprised.gif
  • metta

    Posts: 39143

    Aug 16, 2012 6:11 AM GMT
    Julia Child Remixed

  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Aug 16, 2012 12:53 PM GMT
    metta8 saidJulia Child Remixed


    meh, when i saw this yesterday it seemed more like a parody than a tribute,

    but maybe it's the kind of thing she'd get a kick out of, so I have to trust that someone close to her signed off on it.

    still, feels like a moment where technology took a wrong turn.