Any gay men working in the Videogame/3D Animation/CGI industry? Advice.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 1:11 AM GMT
    Hi guys, I hope all is well. This is my first post, so here goes:

    For the last year I've quietly read through many forum topics and opinions, er "discussions", and have had the pleasure of people opening up their lives and interests for me to read about. By the way, you're all VERY entertaining and I do have some favourite forum commenters/posters besides the occassional LOL cats that never seem to dissapoint! As a result, I've come to see many things from many different sides which is something I really appreciate and respect. Thank-you.

    However, I haven't noticed anyone mention that they work in the CGI or Videogame Industry. I've seen guys post which films or games they enjoy but nothing along the lines of it being their career or something they are working towards being a part of. I assume that there are talented gay men working in this art related field and yet I do realize that I'm on a site dedicated to sports and fitness. "Needle in a hay stack" I suppose but still maybe one guy?? I'm working very diligently and I'm producing, what I feel to be and what people/studios tell me, exceptional 3D images and yet I'm not having any luck getting my foot through a door. Ive had a few interviews by some bigger studios but get passed over because someone with more experience is chosen. So, I mustered some courage to post and was just looking for some advice. Are there any guys with experience who could take a moment from their busy days to give a guy like me some pointers? Any help and or comments are appreciated. Thanks guys.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 1:17 AM GMT
    *waits for sedative*
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 2:28 AM GMT
    Fable said*waits for sedative*

    And UncleverName...
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Aug 15, 2008 4:22 PM GMT
    While we wait, I suggest that the OP cut and paste his question on the gaygamer.net site and see if he gets any help.

    http://www.gaygamer.net
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 4:29 PM GMT
    Move to the Bay area in California? We have EA, Sega, lucas arts etc etc....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 4:57 PM GMT
    LOL, yes. There are several of us here. Artmonkeys like me and bgcat, and coders like UncleverName.

    I am currently part of an independent (read: nonpaying, mostly for experience and portfolio building) project which I won't disclose publicly LOL, but I can email it to you if you want. We're working on an Unreal Tournament 3 Mod for the Make Something Unreal Contest.

    I'm a 3d modeler/mapper for game resources. Thus I work more on polygon conserving stuff rather than the out and out bulimia of detail on CGI and animation industries.

    Some of my work are posted in my profile.

    Here are some of my work (props) ingame:

    x1kd6.jpg

    I've not 'broken' into the pro-artists either, so not much advice here. I suggest you join independent game dev groups. It's the closest you can get to apprenticeship, as well as bragging rights to the finished product, it'll get you hired easier if you can show actual output and demonstrate that you can work in a group (which is how we Digital Artists are supposed to work anyhow). 5 people on our team are professionals who have worked/are working for big name studios and game titles. Our coders have dayjobs as well, though not in the game industry.

    That said, I'm only 22, LOL, and only starting, with no formal education on digital art, so I don't really have much advice to someone like you with more experience than me. I'm only an artmonkey. icon_wink.gif

    Can you post samples of your work, perhaps? icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 6:41 PM GMT
    I used to do quite a lot of videogame design stuff as a hobby. I had created one of the largest and most celebrated mods for EA's Battle for Middle-Earth game. I had a hell of a fun time doing it for.. two years, I think? By the end of it though, life caught up with me and I had to drop the project.

    Unfortunately, I won't be able to pick it up again for a while: the external hard drive I had pushed all that stuff to died a couple months ago. With luck, I'll be able to recover some/all of it, but I don't have the money for that right now.

    Here's a splash page I had created for the mod some time ago:
    http://elven.the3rdage.net/wallpaper/wallpaper6.jpg
  • ajw18

    Posts: 141

    Aug 15, 2008 7:29 PM GMT
    If you want to do anything that is hardcore visuals and programming, then you would definitely need to move to CA. Although many big names (EA, for example) are there and do most of their own programming, it would be better to start out at one of the smaller companies that are outsourced to. For example, Take Two Interactive (which owns Rockstar Games) is based here in NY. Everything corporate is here (expect the offices for 2k Sports). But most of the coding and a bulk of the graphics are done by another company that also does 3D animations for Pixar. Make sure you have a portfolio to show.

    I worked on the corporate end of things, so this is as much as I know about what you are looking for. Hope this helps!
  • UncleverName

    Posts: 741

    Aug 15, 2008 8:10 PM GMT
    There are a few game companies, in Canada, closer to the East Coast. Notably, EA has a studio somewhere in Quebec, and Ubisoft has a studio there as well. I'm guessing, but don't know, that there are a couple of small companies still existing in/around Toronto, and there used to be one or two in the maritimes. There are also tons of companies (about 20) in Vancouver, on the west coast. After that, there are tons in California, and spread throughout the US. I'm guessing that you know how to use Google though (and read Gamasutra.com), and knew all of the above.

    I'm a programmer, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

    I went to a school called DigiPen, that was funded by Nintendo and taught video game programming and art. After I graduated, it still took me 1.5 years to get hired, because of my lack of experience.

    I think that Sedative made some great suggestions, but I'd also suggest that you just need to keep sending out resumes, and be patient. It takes time to get a job, especially when you don't have experience. Take the time, if you can, to improve your portfolio.

    Also, do what you can to become friends with people working in the industry. They will be able to hook you up with job opportunities. It's a very small industry (at least, here in Vancouver it is) and your best way to get hired is through people you know.

    I don't think you'll have to move to California specifically, but I would definitely be prepared to move. I'd send resumes everywhere! Try the UK, try France, try Italy (Rockstar's in Venice too, I think), and try Australia. Canadians can get a one year work visa in Australia super easy.

    You're likely to get hired at a smaller studio, but EA is basically always hiring somewhere, even if they've just laid off 300 people. They want employees that are young, cheap, and will really throw themselves into their work.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 9:28 PM GMT
    Hey Guys,

    Thanks for your replies and suggestions- much appreciated. I want to respond to each of you and maybe further give you a better understanding of my situation.

    Fable, Seeing as how this is my first post and the first responce was *waits for sedative*. I figured my post was so bad that you were patiently waiting for someone to give you a sedative to deal with it. I felt like a loser until LOL, I realized later "Sedative" was a dude and not a drug of some form. And maybe now u are starting to see my situation hahaha.

    Gigadu, thanks for the name drop. kidding.

    Auryn, I've been to that site before but clearly never spent enough time on it to realize there was a forum for serious topics. Most of what I saw was fan talk. However, there was a link to an 'odd email login site' that they refer 'professional gay men in the industry' to where they can enter their personal information. Just didn't feel right doing that for a couple reasons. But I'll take a second look at the forums.

    Kozmeka, I'd love to move to California and have the opportunity to work in the US market, however, I'm Canadian with little experience and no work-visa. All American, English and Australian Studios that I've applied to have told me that despite them feeling I had talent- the 2 earlier facts written above make me a hard sell, wished me continued luck and success and to apply again when I've had a few years experience in Canada. RareWare in England, and Krome in Australia went as far to tell me that its difficult to get their governments to allow them to hire outside the country when they should be hiring from within.

    Sedative, Dude, cool shiz man. Too bad we live so far away as you're another 3D modeler/ texture artist. I also do lighting, rendering and animation. I do both Low and High poly models mostly. I'd love to work on anything and get some credit besides the random contract work. (which is not for games anyway) What programs do you use? I use Maya, and REALLY want to get into ZBrush. Is that 3DSMax you used? Do you know of any Independates looking for some help perhaps? I think that is a smart way to make contacts as you mentioned you're working with professionals. Very cool, keep it up. I'd like to post my artwork but at the moment everything has my name and contact info written on it. Message me and I can send u a link to my official site if you'd like. Feedback?

    Blink777, sorry to hear about your drive, that really sucks. I hope you can recover your work as I know the pain of losing important stuff after a pc failure or error. You were working but then life caught up? I hope everything is well now. Was this an Independant group of guys or something EA was paying you to do? I assume most mods are fans adding in what they want but I could be wrong. All in all, the splash looks great and I love that the characters have the real actor's faces photographed/textured right on the model.lol. Hook a bro up if you know people in EA, eh!?

    ajw18, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada is pretty much the California of Canada in terms of silicon valley and games/film studios. I have to get out there somehow. Quebec and Toronto are fast becoming this way aswell. Thing is there's not a ton of studios like in the US, and the competition is very fierce here. Most of the people I know got in because they knew someone and had talent. I dont know a soul and I'm not a programmer by any means, only an artist. My history with the smaller studios is as such: 1)either too small to take on 3D artists (mobile phone studios), no need for more artists or no open positions or 2)started by industry vets who only hire experienced guys who wanted out of the big places for more creative freedom.

    All in all, I guess it's the nature of the beast and the type of industry I'm in. I take full responsibility as I choose this for a profession. I know this is a long responce- Sorry about that but Thank-You to all for responding with your help. Greatly Appreciated.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 15, 2008 9:48 PM GMT
    IvesCardin08 said
    Fable, Seeing as how this is my first post and the first responce was *waits for sedative*. I figured my post was so bad that you were patiently waiting for someone to give you a sedative to deal with it. I felt like a loser until LOL, I realized later "Sedative" was a dude and not a drug of some form. And maybe now u are starting to see my situation hahaha.


    ROFL finally my name gets used the way it's meant to! icon_lol.gif

    I use 3dsMax, though yeah, like you I REALLY wanna learn Zbrush. If only for normal map rendering. It's sooo cool. icon_cool.gif

    I don't do my own rendering/lighting though, only models and textures (the scene renders in my profile were made by our art director), partly because my machine sucks, and can't handle big render loads. icon_sad.gif

    I do my textures in GIMP (yeah, I know, I'm weird. LOL, I just can't get used to PS).

    So yeah hit me up on your site. I'm still a noob though, so can't help much, nor offer contacts heh. As for independents, depends on your interests. I've always loved space-based games especially RTS's like Homeworld, Space Shooters like Freelancer, and good ole FPS like Halflife. Our game is more space-based which is why I chose it.

    Plenty of independents looking for artists/coders around. I mean a lot! You can try us too, if you want (though acceptance to the team would depend on our art director) Heh. And that'd mean you'd have to wait like another year until we put out a finished game. Our art director got his job on Liquid from our game project.

    Though in your case, you're looking more into movies, right? Another suggestion is make a youtube channel or a DeviantArt account featuring short movies and/or your art. I've known several artists who made the break this way. The guy who did that Final Fantasy vs. Capcom Girls movies for example, or Kris Wilson (a comic artist on DeviantArt).

    P.S. that pic I posted is not of 3dsmax, it's a screenshot of a game map in the Unreal Editor (UED).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 16, 2008 1:35 AM GMT
    IvesCardin08 saidBlink777, sorry to hear about your drive, that really sucks. I hope you can recover your work as I know the pain of losing important stuff after a pc failure or error. You were working but then life caught up? I hope everything is well now. Was this an Independant group of guys or something EA was paying you to do? I assume most mods are fans adding in what they want but I could be wrong. All in all, the splash looks great and I love that the characters have the real actor's faces photographed/textured right on the model.lol. Hook a bro up if you know people in EA, eh!?

    Hehe. That project was actually just me alone doing everything from texture art, to modelling, to animating, to coding, to map design. Definitely not the best way to go at a big'ish project, but I still had fun.

    In terms of my connection to EA: I had very little. Whenever my mod was up for an award in 2006, I was contacted by the publicity/public relations team for Battle for Middle-Earth and was congratulated. That's about it. Sorry I can't be any help there icon_wink.gif.
  • Rightguard

    Posts: 34

    Aug 16, 2008 2:23 AM GMT
    IvesCardin08 saidHi guys, I hope all is well. This is my first post, so here goes:

    For the last year I've quietly read through many forum topics and opinions, er "discussions", and have had the pleasure of people opening up their lives and interests for me to read about. By the way, you're all VERY entertaining and I do have some favourite forum commenters/posters besides the occassional LOL cats that never seem to dissapoint! As a result, I've come to see many things from many different sides which is something I really appreciate and respect. Thank-you.

    However, I haven't noticed anyone mention that they work in the CGI or Videogame Industry. I've seen guys post which films or games they enjoy but nothing along the lines of it being their career or something they are working towards being a part of. I assume that there are talented gay men working in this art related field and yet I do realize that I'm on a site dedicated to sports and fitness. "Needle in a hay stack" I suppose but still maybe one guy?? I'm working very diligently and I'm producing, what I feel to be and what people/studios tell me, exceptional 3D images and yet I'm not having any luck getting my foot through a door. Ive had a few interviews by some bigger studios but get passed over because someone with more experience is chosen. So, I mustered some courage to post and was just looking for some advice. Are there any guys with experience who could take a moment from their busy days to give a guy like me some pointers? Any help and or comments are appreciated. Thanks guys.



    I work in the industry as a QA lead at a large game company.

    I can honestly tell you that Art is probably one of the hardest departments to get in to. There are tons of qualified people applying for these jobs. Make sure your resume is relevant, quick, and to the point! I can definitely tell you that many resumes are thrown out within the first 15-20 seconds of looking at them.

    Your best bet is networking and/or getting published work under your belt. It may require you doing work for free for a bit.

    Alternatively, we get a lot of artists coming in to QA temp jobs hoping to use it as a foot-in-the-door. It sometimes works, depends on how you use the time when you are there. Big tip: if you do this, bust your ass at doing a good job at testing, if you perform poorly you will quickly gain a bad rep.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 16, 2008 4:44 AM GMT
    /me whispers, throwing furtive glances over his shoulder down the dank alley
    "EA is evil, EVILL!"
  • UncleverName

    Posts: 741

    Aug 16, 2008 5:53 AM GMT
    It's really difficult to get a working visa to the UK, Europe or the US, especially if you don't have a degree and/or have less than 5 years experience. Australia is actually quite easy to get into for one year for a Canadian, and they have a few game companies there. I would still apply at companies in those countries, but would not hold my breath. Sounds like you know that already though IvesCardin.

    I was tempted to write that EA was evil originally, but thought better of it. They aren't evil. They just like money a lot. And they're good at making it. They have an awesome stock to buy and sell. It actually moves quite a lot, but is still reasonably safe to buy at any point.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 16, 2008 11:57 PM GMT
    Hey guys, Once again, thanks for all the replies/posts.
    icon_smile.gif

    UncleverName, You rock bro!! You've been alot of help and I just missed your post last time but thanks for your email and the listing of studios. I would LOVE to work in Austrailia. Warm weather all year round no? Do you know of any other game studios beside Krome and exactly how does one go about getting a work-visa into Austrailia? Yaaaaa.. thats embarrasing that I dont know...time to google that info asap-haha.

    Sedative, Im glad my confusion brings you such joy that you ROTFL! (guess Im doing well for a first time poster as this would be my third time now) I really didnt know what I had said to make Fable require drugs?!-lol. You mean no one has mentioned the proper use of your online name? Like you, I too have hardware restricitons so rendering out an entire 10 min film like the AMAZING fight scene (I think its called Dead Fantasy parts 1 and 2- either way both parts rock)between Final Fantasy chicks and the Dead or Alive girls would be near impossible on my machine. Im suprised I can get what I get out of it. Im not a single-genre gamer as I love any type of game as long as its engaging and loads of fun to play. Though I never have time to play anything. Personally, Id rather be in games than film, but it doesnt matter that much to me. Im definitely looking for NON-paying work now to build more resume experience. We should do a ZBrush class together- online courses anywhere??

    Blink777, I can see the look on your face after they called. "Thats IT?" I bet when EA called you were thinking "They're soooo gonna offer me a job" only to be left going WHAT JUST HAPPENED? Thanks PR!!!(thumbs up sarcastically)

    Rightgaurd, I cant promise that I wont be spamming your RealJock account with resumes, cover letters and samples of my models, textures, renders and animation. How LARGE is large when u say you work for a Large company? AKA, WHERE do u work? Oh, and how do we become BEST FRIENDS???

    Buckwheat, ur name is killer. So...why is EA evil, EVILL? Everyone likes to compare them to Disney's evilness in the film world. What makes EA so bad besides people saying its slave work that never ends. I guess if I have to ask, its probably true, but still, whats up with them? Im pretty sure they were always voted number 1 best game studio to work for until Nintendo's EAD knocked them to number 2 this year. What am I missing that you guys know?

    Yet again, thanks guys -take care
  • UncleverName

    Posts: 741

    Aug 18, 2008 4:09 AM GMT
    Why is EA evil? Or more appropriately, why are they occasionally described as Evill?

    Well, like I said, they like money a lot. To make sure that their stock price stays high, they occasionally fire large numbers of employee's. That's the first thing.

    The second thing is that generally, they don't care about their employees. This is evidenced by the fact that they encourage overtime, without providing much in the way of compensation. Here in British Columbia, years ago, under a different provincial government, they insisted that if the laws weren't changed, they would move their entire operation down to Seattle. The government gave in, and now all high tech companies in BC can get employees to work over time without paying them time and a half. Way to go EA!

    The third thing is that they produce sub par games often, but own so much shelf space that people with small brains will buy their games anyways. I mean, they basically produce the same sports games every year, and still rake in the cash. Occasionally this is not true, and they produce something stupendous. In my experience, the great stuff they produce usually comes out of an independent studio that EA has contracted work out to, or a smaller studio that EA has just purchased and not fully assimilated yet icon_smile.gif

    Of course, EA is just a group of (many) people, and the above statements are, for the most part, generalizations. People at all levels, at EA, make their own decisions. What I've said is just what I've seen happen over the last few years.

    Also, as I said, they have a great stock to play with. In large part because of the above three reasons. So evil or not, I still buy it. Does that make me evil? Oh god, how am I going to sleep tonight? These pretzels are making me thirsty.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2008 3:43 PM GMT
    As far as game studios are concerned, I like

    http://www.valvesoftware.com/

    valve_head_home.gif

    Though EA might eat them soon. icon_cry.gif

    Valve said in a recent interview about being bought by EA:

    It is funny that you read the stories about EA being this evil empire or whatever; our experience has been completely the opposite. We see the folks as being very similar in terms of their mind set as we are and they are very adult, or progressive if you would like, about how they interfaced with us and how they can help and where their value is and their relationship.

    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Valve-Might-Be-Interested-in-Being-Acquired-91501.shtml

    http://www.n4g.com/industrynews/News-165650.aspx

    Don't take the bait Valve. icon_cry.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2008 4:14 PM GMT
    I think that Sedative brings up (indirectly) a good point. You need have to be both broad and specific in skill sets in the various CGI industries. You are not 'in the woods' being in Canada as there are many opportunities there. The issue may be in the gaming industry as there is the largest level of competition for jobs. You have to be good, fast and cheap to make it in. Don't shoot too high early on though. Getting a foot in the door is more important at first because as a neophyte, you'll start to get an idea workflow. This way, you can also decide which direction or specialty you'd like to focus on, (or focus on first if you plan on several) whether it's modeling, texturing, lighting, rendering, compositing, rigging, animating or one of the even more specific areas.
    There are other area's of CGI besides gaming, but I'm not sure if it's gaming only or would you be interested in other industries (Architechural, product development, forensic animation, analytical/simulation work, and lastly film/video non-gaming entertainment.) All of these have different skill sets that overlap significantly.
    Workflows, technical accuracy, scheduling, knowledge of physics for dynamic simulations, formal aesthetic training and/or understanding all have greater or lesser importance depending on where you want to work.
    Knowing Maya is good at this point, but it's more about what you can do with the tool, and not what tool you have.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2008 4:15 PM GMT
    I work in the industry in Southern California. I don't make a lot of money at it as competition is fierce, and there are a lot of younger ones coming out of colleges that don't demand the high rates of pay that I expect with 30 years of experience behind me. I do matte paintings, and certain other CGI effects. Currently I'm doing effects work for a web-based series called STAR TREK NEW VOYAGES, also called STAR TREK: PHASE II. This show takes-up where the Original Series left off, as though NBC had never cancelled the show. It's in the 4th year of Captain Kirk's first 5-year mission. It's won the TV Guide award for Best Web-Based Science Fiction Series, and many of the original stars, writers, and directors are working on the show. It has about 30 million viewers. I'm mostly doing transporter effects and animated matte paintings.

    You can read an article about my work on the show here...

    http://www.startreknewvoyages.com/feature004.html

    It's much harder to get a job in the field these days than it was when I started in the days before CGI. But, if you're good at what you do, and are persistent, there will be a place for you. I make extra money doing post-production sweetening currently on documentaries and off-road racing videos. I have also edited many adult feature-length films. I used to do traditional matte paintings and matte cinematography for Roger Corman, among others, and his company is still a good way to get your foot in the door, as they are an open shop.
    Unfortunately, there are a lot of guys out there who feel that just because they own a copy of After Effects, 3DS Max, Maya or Final Cut that they can be an effects artist or editor, and it's just not so. Many of them talk a good game, but when it comes down to it, they don't have the eye or the discipline for working in films, where you have to be willing to let go of your own visions in favor of the director's ideas, or the ability to work on a crew with others of greater experience.
    In many cases it's still a field where you have to start at a position that is lower than you might like in order to prove yourself to the higher-ups and then move up the ladder.
    I've been working for 30 years, and most people still have no idea who I am, but I keep at it, as I was raised in the film industry, and it's what I love.
    Best of luck to you!

    NG beam out gif 2
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2008 4:39 PM GMT
    Indeed teamwork is really essential.

    In games for example the workflow is definite, from the project leader, fiction writers, art director, concept artists, modelers, texturers, riggers, and finally people who place them ingame.

    It's important that everybody knows his place. A break in the chain causes a lot of unnecessary headaches.

    Also being able to take criticism (especially from bosses), being able to discard your work if deemed unfit (this hurts... a lot, especially if you've worked hard on it, but if art director says no, it has to be no), being able to adapt easily (i.e. art director says, change this, change that, and being able to say 'aye sah' icon_razz.gif), the ability to do it fast without sacrificing quality, the ability to meet deadlines, the ability to take other people's outputs and work with them, and very important in game resources is the ability to plan ahead for optimization. That means, building a model while planning it to take the lowest polycount, the best quality, the highest modularity/reusability, and map sharing. Not applicable all the time of course, but if needed you must be able to plan a model out before even building it.

    As my boss said once, texturing is 90% planning. It applies to optimizing models too, I think. This is actually where film CGI and game resources art differ. CGI effects have little or no optimization and use the best quality all the time as resources permit. Games have to take into account the processing limitations and have to optimize everything.

    It's why game artists are called 'art monkeys' (and conversely coders are 'code monkeys'). You basically hop around doing everything you're told to do.

    Also as bgcat said, formal aesthetic training, hehe. You have to be an artist too, at least have the ability to draw (which you do icon_wink.gif ). Because even if you give a guy the best training in 3d modeling, if he can only draw stick figures in trad art or if his idea of high art is badly drawn anime, he'll still only make bad 3d.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 19, 2008 7:05 AM GMT
    Hey everyone! I'm new to RealJock too so I guess this is my intro post as well.

    (back to topic)

    So I just got out of college and am a programmer as well. I'm not in the industry professionally, but I think a great way to get experience is to work on your own games or projects in your spare time.

    I know its time consuming, but the experience usually gets noticed. Check out some indie game forums and see if anyone has projects going that could use artists. Usually working on indie games allow you to try different things instead of being in one role.

    I've worked on a couple projects and plan on doing a couple more. Hopefully that will get some notice. Its not work experience, but its still experience. And working with a group will give you something to talk about during interviews too.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 19, 2008 7:24 AM GMT
    Scias do you by any chance know UTscript? LOL

    nvm icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 25, 2008 8:41 PM GMT
    Hey guys, I'd like to first thank everyone for their imput/advice/suggestions.

    So...It turns out that an American Studio has shown interest in me/my portfolio work and has sent me a test to complete. ( icon_biggrin.gif ) I've been busily working away at conquering this test and then I started to think...the test results are the first step towards an interview. I've been through a few CGI/game interviews before and the questions are usually similiar and yet very different at the same time (depending on job title/location/etc.) In other words, they always seem to ask what your not expecting to be asked.

    The reason I write this is to ask. Can you guys think of any questions, anything at all, that might be asked of me so that I'm better prepared during the interview? Anything technical, personal or artistic???? Thanks guys. (I really want this position- it's a great studio too, and the best location!!!, if it's not meant to be- I really did give it my all, BUT ITS TOTALLY MEANT TO BE!!! hahahaha-gotta psych myself up icon_biggrin.gif )
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 25, 2008 8:57 PM GMT
    It's less an issue about what the questions are than how you answer them. Don't say you can do things that you can't, but relay skills that are related. (on a simple level - Don't say you know 3DS Max, when you know Maya. Say "No, but I know Maya and the principles of modeling etc, so I'm sure I could learn it quickly if that's the application you use.)

    Don't ever take credit for someone else's work. You can tell them you did the modeling, but not the compositing or lighting on a sample demo scene. Besides the ethical issue, it's a very small community and you may be showing the work to someone who knows other people on the team that worked on it.

    Give examples of collaborative work and how you dealt with the workflow.

    Say 'I don't know' if you don't. You can always add, "but I'm willing to learn." or "I've never done that, but I might try to solve the problem by..."