Snow Tires

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 3:56 AM GMT
    I would like to get some dedicated snow tires for the coming season.....NO STUDDED tires though. Anyone have any suggestions or recommendations of makes?....I looked online at some options....they all look round and black...anyone?
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Aug 17, 2012 4:28 AM GMT
    They usually have a rating for snow and rain .. the bigger the tread the better for snow .. If you have good tires you could also just take them to someplace like Big O and they will slices in the rubber all the way around and that is suppose to also be helpful ... best thing to do is go down to you local good year or good rich and ask about recommendations and why ... mitchilum is also a good brand .. and really it depends on your car or truck or suv
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 1:16 PM GMT
    You need snow tires in Dublin OH? Will not a quality set of all season radials do? Where I live snow tires are required by law from December through March. I buy cheap. Even buying cheap they outperform any all season tires by a long shot. I can't believe how well I can drive my parked car out of snow and ice after a storm. I have much better traction for stopping on slick roads.
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    Aug 17, 2012 1:20 PM GMT
    Sporty_g saidI would like to get some dedicated snow tires for the coming season.....NO STUDDED tires though. Anyone have any suggestions or recommendations of makes?....I looked online at some options....they all look round and black...anyone?


    Check out tirerack.com - I've bought mine off there in the past and will likely do so again - but they have ratings and recommendations. The people there are also quite helpful/knowledgeable though I guess you have to take it with a grain of salt since they are trying to sell you something but they have an excellent selection. Just bear in mind you have to get rims/wheels specific to your car... and their selection engine guides you in that direction.

    Parenthetically, I would also highly recommend for winter driving (or even driving in the rain) getting some type of windshield water repellent. The two most popular options are RainX and Aquapel (both available off amazon). Rainx you have to reapply every one-two months while Aquapel is half a year to a year. If you travel over 40 mph, water just drifts off your windshield - it's really quite magical as you have perfect visibility while watching others flip their wipers like mad. I just tried using RainX last weekend and it was great - just like Aquapel - but just for ease of application, I think I'll stick to Aquapel in the future.

    The other benefit in winter is that for slush because the water repels, instead of drying in streaks on your windshield, the salt just dries in a pinprick so you can still see if you're travelling a long ways. Also you can get windshield wipers with the blades coated with the silicone (PIAA w/silicone - available at tirerack and elsewhere I am sure). Good windshield wipers also help tremendously.
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    Aug 17, 2012 1:32 PM GMT
    I've always had great experiences with Nokian winter tires. I've used them on everything from my Nissans to my Jeeps. They do a great job.
  • Hothouse

    Posts: 2204

    Aug 17, 2012 1:45 PM GMT
    I had snow tires once, but when it warmed up they melted.
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    Aug 17, 2012 1:50 PM GMT
    Be prepared to get an extra set of steel wheels for them because its not.cost-effective.to put them on your factory wheels. And ill second the recommendation of reading reviews on tirerack.com
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 1:52 PM GMT
    Snow tires are so yesteryear.
    In Canada our tires are all-season.
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    Aug 17, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    kawaiidesu saidSnow tires are so yesteryear.
    In Canada our tires are all-season.
    No - that's what a lot of people in Toronto think... but come a bit of ice rain you can see how wrong they are. If you drive even a moderate amount you should swap them out with snow tires.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 2:07 PM GMT
    Mm. I like studs.
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    Aug 17, 2012 2:10 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    kawaiidesu saidSnow tires are so yesteryear.
    In Canada our tires are all-season.
    No - that's what a lot of people in Toronto think... but come a bit of ice rain you can see how wrong they are. If you drive even a moderate amount you should swap them out with snow tires.
    Don't drive don't care.
    2j2cehy.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 3:57 PM GMT
    I used to keep a separate set of tires and wheels for studded snow tires. But unless you live where the roads are ice-covered for months at a time (not just one or two days a month) it's not worth it. Go with a good set of all season radials and carry a set of good chains for when things get hairy.
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    Aug 17, 2012 4:00 PM GMT
    I have a set of bridgestone blizzaks for my miata back when i was using it as a daily driver here in CO. They worked very well, its very impressive what a difference snow tires make.
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    Aug 17, 2012 4:25 PM GMT
    In nearly 40 years of driving, about the only time I ever drove in snow was one time with the top down playing with the curves & inclines on the Blue Ridge Parkway while there were some flurries at higher elevations. I just put the heater on. Didn't seem to effect traction, didn't notice any snow on the road and with less speed than it takes to keep out a light rain, I didn't notice any snow getting inside. Was pretty fun actually. Nothing like I see of driving in snow when they show all the sliding and accidents on television. That's the snow I'd never want to drive on. Well, not unless I was in an iceboat. That looks pretty fun...

    245134936_5uCA2-L.jpg
  • Montague

    Posts: 5205

    Aug 17, 2012 4:36 PM GMT
    Get some drag slicks and have a blast driving in the snow!! :-D
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    Aug 17, 2012 5:25 PM GMT
    I've found these to be as good or even better than those discontinued Goodyear Flex-Ten tires the police used to use that NASA had developed for lunar rovers:


    http://www.mastercrafttires.com/html/products/tires_passenger.aspx?page=mastercraft_tires_passenger_glacier_grip_II
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 5:36 PM GMT
    I'm in Colorado and got my first set of snow tires last year. The difference between them and all seasons is night and day. My car is RWD and it does better on ice and snow with snow tires than my previous FWD car did with all season tires. I drove up to the ski resorts with no trouble.

    But honestly, the biggest determining factor is the driver's ability to drive in snow. No matter how good a person's snow tires are, they won't do a bit of good if the driver thinks 4WD means they can go as fast as they want and brakes always work on ice. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • trevchaser

    Posts: 237

    Aug 17, 2012 5:57 PM GMT
    Go on tirerack and check out the "surveys". They have ratings on the tires from users and give a great indication on which type of snow tire is good for you, your car, and driving conditions.

    There's a reason why all seasons are really no season tires. They are average working in all conditions but physics tells us nothing can have it all. I use summers for the summer and fall, and winters for the winter and spring. If it's wet/dry with just above freezing temps, a winter tire will stop you faster than a summer tire or all season. When it's dry/raining at 90F/30C, a summer tire will stop faster than an all season. Most people think about just accelerating and if they can do that, they are happy. But it's a point of when you will have to panic stop, not if.

    So it's just a tolerance and balance of your peace of mind. Pay now or pay later?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 7:51 PM GMT
    kawaiidesu saidSnow tires are so yesteryear.
    In Canada our tires are all-season.
    Not even remotely true
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 9:25 PM GMT
    For snow use you want a tire designated as "M+S" or "M&S" for mud & snow. The technical specs are very complex, but in summary, these tires typically will differ from other tires in these regards:

    - More open, self-cleaning tread pattern.
    - Wider tire contact patch with the ground.
    - Softer rubber compound for greater traction, that remains more soft in colder temperatures than non-M+S tires.
    - Less wear resistance, as a tradeoff for the softer rubber compound and open tread pattern.
    - Greater rolling resistance, and more road noise, as a tradeoff for the open tread pattern and increased contact patch.
    - Maximum allowable weight load may also be reduced, as will the top speed rating.

    Ideally all 4 tires should be a matched set of M+S.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2012 9:41 PM GMT
    Sporty_g saidI would like to get some dedicated snow tires for the coming season.....NO STUDDED tires though.
    Well, that just blew my idea.

    prss056971.jpg
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    Aug 17, 2012 9:58 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Sporty_g saidI would like to get some dedicated snow tires for the coming season.....NO STUDDED tires though.
    Well, that just blew my idea.

    prss056971.jpg

    Gives a whole new meaning to "tire studs".
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    Aug 18, 2012 12:10 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    paulflexes said
    Sporty_g saidI would like to get some dedicated snow tires for the coming season.....NO STUDDED tires though.
    Well, that just blew my idea.

    prss056971.jpg

    Gives a whole new meaning to "tire studs".


    GLAD TO MAKE EXCEPTIONS!....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 18, 2012 12:36 AM GMT
    Sporty_g said
    Art_Deco said
    paulflexes said
    Sporty_g saidI would like to get some dedicated snow tires for the coming season.....NO STUDDED tires though.
    Well, that just blew my idea.

    prss056971.jpg

    Gives a whole new meaning to "tire studs".


    GLAD TO MAKE EXCEPTIONS!....
    With that kind of studded tire, you don't need to worry about snow or ice. He's hot enough to melt it.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Aug 18, 2012 12:38 AM GMT
    kawaiidesu said
    riddler78 said
    kawaiidesu saidSnow tires are so yesteryear.
    In Canada our tires are all-season.
    No - that's what a lot of people in Toronto think... but come a bit of ice rain you can see how wrong they are. If you drive even a moderate amount you should swap them out with snow tires.
    Don't drive don't care.
    2j2cehy.jpg

    not smart enough to pass the test-live with your parents and you're on too many meds- damn be honest.

    OP get all season tiresicon_idea.gif