I beat it. Now I need to start over.

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    Aug 19, 2012 2:38 AM GMT
    I beat cancer. For the past 15 months I've been dealing with cancer of the bladder. It was caught early and with very aggressive treatment of all types, as of yesterday there was no detectable cancer found. I'm still on some meds for the forseeable future.

    I want to get back into shape again. The drugs, treatment, and such took it's toll on my fitness.

    Has anyone dealt with this? If so, how'd you get started back in the gym. I've begun walking regularly and some occasional jogging.

    Any feedback or guidance would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
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    Aug 19, 2012 10:51 AM GMT
    Congrats on beating cancer! *Hugs* Your doctor might be the best one to talk to, or a trainer who specializes in this kind of situation.
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    Aug 19, 2012 11:21 AM GMT
    Congratulations - and congratulations on choosing to get back into life and fitness.

    Given your meds don't impact your ability to exercise - you will need to check this out with your physician.

    Start with a good foundation of fitness, Yoga for stretching, maybe some pilates to get the muscles used to the idea of work again.

    Move onto a light regime of cardiovascular activity - walking, jogging, swimming and using some of the machines in a gym - don't push too hard too fast.

    Start muscle toning with lighter weights and more reps - as you tone up, you can move onto heavier weights and fewer reps.

    *HUGS*

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    Aug 19, 2012 11:41 AM GMT
    I don't have any great fitness advice, but I do want to say congratulations on beating the big C! I wish you all the best, and I would take it slow and not try to push yourself too hard too fast.

    Stay strong!
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    Aug 19, 2012 12:10 PM GMT
    that is AWESOME!!!
    congratulations! i'm sure it was tough, but you're right about not being completely through the woods yet. you still have meds/treatment to take, and many of these drugs have heavy side effects.

    i'd talk to your doctor about what you want to achieve with getting back to the gym. take it slow. you have your whole life ahead of you!!! icon_smile.gif

    for me, fitness has a great deal to do with visualisation. thinking about what you want to achieve. collecting photos about your ideal body type (within reason - everyone is made differently!) and setting little goals towards that. i have a folder on my computer desk top where i collect pics of bods which i admire and would like to emulate (not porn!). it helps you picture in your mind's eye, what you want to achieve with your own fitness. it also helps you describe these goals to others who can help you design a fitness plan (e.g. a doctor or personal trainer, or a gym buddy, etc).

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    Aug 19, 2012 1:35 PM GMT
    Congrats man! I never had to deal with cancer myself or know anyone who went thru it so to me it's truly amazing!
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    Aug 19, 2012 1:38 PM GMT
    midwestcommuter saidI beat cancer. For the past 15 months I've been dealing with cancer of the bladder. It was caught early and with very aggressive treatment of all types, as of yesterday there was detectable cancer found. I'm still on some meds for the forseeable future.

    I want to get back into shape again. The drugs, treatment, and such took it's toll on my fitness.

    Has anyone dealt with this? If so, how'd you get started back in the gym. I've begun walking regularly and some occasional jogging.

    Any feedback or guidance would be appreciated.

    Thanks!


    That's so great! The only experience I've had with it is indirect; my grandma passed away from stomach cancer. It devastated me.

    Just be patient, hit the gym, eat right and you'll be fit as f*ck in no time! icon_wink.gif
  • SomeSiciliano...

    Posts: 543

    Aug 19, 2012 4:45 PM GMT

    That is great news icon_smile.gif Many congrats and healthy days ahead. I was a teenager when I had my big episode and a small scare about 5 years ago. The later one put a huge dent in my fitness level and I'm still crawling out of the hole.

    SC69 is right on: first please make sure that your cardiovascular system has not been compromised in treatment. Work within your comfort level to establish and baseline and then work on setting and meeting goals. In my case, be prepared for some ugly reality: there are certain metrics that I will never, ever obtain again. Stay positive by looking at your program from the Big Picture and try not to get lost on micro-factors (easier said than done).
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    Aug 19, 2012 5:13 PM GMT
    midwestcommuter saidI beat cancer. For the past 15 months I've been dealing with cancer of the bladder. It was caught early and with very aggressive treatment of all types, as of yesterday there was detectable cancer found. I'm still on some meds for the forseeable future.

    I want to get back into shape again. The drugs, treatment, and such took it's toll on my fitness.

    Has anyone dealt with this? If so, how'd you get started back in the gym. I've begun walking regularly and some occasional jogging.

    Any feedback or guidance would be appreciated.

    Thanks!


    Makes me happy man congrats icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif: ) I'd imagine its best to start slow as your body needs to recoup a little from your treatments. Congrats again man can't imagine how awesome that must feel icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 19, 2012 5:37 PM GMT
    midwestcommuter saidI beat cancer. For the past 15 months I've been dealing with cancer of the bladder. It was caught early and with very aggressive treatment of all types, as of yesterday there was detectable cancer found. I'm still on some meds for the forseeable future.

    First congrats. But did you wish to say ..."there WAS detectable cancer found" or "...there was NO detectable cancer found"?

    I don't know what your treatment was, but I know mine made me very weak, a profound loss of stamina & strength, quickly exhausted with the slightest exertion. The clinical treatment went from August, 2011 to February, 2012, and today I'm still recovering my previous strength. But there seemed to be a turning point last month, when things started to really improve more rapidly. That's when I returned to biking, but not going beyond 30-mile rides yet.

    I didn't try to fight it, and the doctor's agreed. I just took it easy, didn't push myself, let my body fight the things that were being done to it, and their aftermath. It reminded me of when I had pneumonia when I was 37, undiagnosed for a month (thank you, US Army), leaving me the proverbial "weak as a kitten" and taking me 6 months to get my strength back. So a long recovery can be normal, listen to your doctors and don't push the pace. You'll do better in the long run.

    And continued good progress! I'm currently showing no signs of cancer at all, but as you must know 5 years free is the bar to clear for most cancers. And so my oncologist tells me I'm still technically "under treatment." Still, at this stage for both of us a finding of "undetectable" is as good as it gets. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 19, 2012 9:33 PM GMT
    midwestcommuter saidI beat it. Now I need to start over.

    First off, great double entendre thread title, sure to attract fellow cancer survivors who'd get it plus the rest of us degenerates! I speak with some authority being a bit of both. Having said that, despite our similarities what with my being about the same age and having gone through like treatments, the only advice I can give is to work within the parameters of your treatment aftermath because everyone's different. While I'll probably never be doing Insanity, bootcamp and PD90X type workouts and you might, I owned up to, recognized and worked within my limitations, lost 80lbs and achieved results far in excess of any I'd ever achieved before and I still seem to be making slow but steady and seemingly unstoppable gains. You don't have to be a hero and overtax yourself to improve greatly.

    Though your situation may be different, to inspire you here's how I work through preexisting back and knee issues and residual fatigue, balance, neuropathy, photosensitivity, fragility and prostate issues from chemo, antibody and radiation therapy:

    knees & back CARDIO - HIIT on elliptical instead of treadmill, steady state and HIIT lap swim

    photosensitivity - indoor pool

    knees & back WEIGHTS - substitute exercises: buttblaster for lunges, straight seated leg press for angled, light squats to parallel for heavier to floor, back machine and hyperextensions for deadlift, seated calf for standing, chest pad supported rows for bentover ones

    fatigue - 40 minute workouts for most people are 2 hours long for me

    balance - yoga, in which I'm developing mad skills should the ability to perform full splits and squeeze my ears with my knees come in handy

    neuropathy - I just ignore it

    fragility - higher susceptibility to muscle and ligament tears and other injuries meant training with light weights, which taught me muscle isolation, muscle control and the use of strict, proper form

    prostate - inadvisability of use of testosterone or any hormone replacement therapy, and obviously 'roids, means stricter attention to diet and supplementation

    So in a nutshell my advice - take it slow, don't be a hero, be openminded and work within your current capabilities to become the best you yet. Hope that helps.
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    Aug 19, 2012 9:36 PM GMT
    I don't have much advice but I wanted to say congratulations! Woo!