When did the dollar sign - $ - first appear on US currency?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 20, 2012 11:27 AM GMT
    Hmmmmm?

    cat
  • BuggEyedSprit...

    Posts: 920

    Aug 20, 2012 12:26 PM GMT
    And when did the 'cent' symbol disappear?! icon_eek.gif
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 20, 2012 4:19 PM GMT
    From wikipedia...


    The sign is first attested in British, American, Canadian, Mexican and other Spanish American business correspondence in the 1770s, referring to the Spanish American peso,[1][2] also known as "Spanish dollar" or "piece of eight" in British North America, which provided the model for the currency that the United States later adopted in 1785 and the larger coins of the new Spanish American republics such as the Mexican peso, Peruvian eight-real and Bolivian eight-sol coins.

    The best documented explanation reveals that the sign evolved out of the Spanish and Spanish American scribal abbreviation "ps" for pesos. A study of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century manuscripts shows that the s gradually came to be written over the p developing a close equivalent to the "$" mark.[3][4][5][6][7]
    Alternative hypotheses

    There are a number of other theories about the origin of the symbol, some with a measure of academic acceptance, others the symbolic equivalent of false etymologies.[8]
    Drawn with one vertical line ($)
    Slash 8

    One theory is that the dollar sign is derived from a slash through the numeral eight, denoting pieces of eight. The Oxford English Dictionary before 1963 held that this was the most probable explanation, though later editions have placed it in doubt.
    Spanish pieces of eight
    Image of 1768 Spanish Colonial Real silver coin, showing PTSI mint mark in lower right and left quadrants and the Pillars of Hercules surrounding a picture of the world.

    Another theory is that the dollar sign was derived from or inspired by the mint mark on the Spanish pieces of eight that were minted in Potosí (in present day Bolivia). The mint mark, composed of the letters "PTSI" superimposed, bears a strong resemblance to the single-stroke dollar sign (see photo). The mark, which appeared on silver coins minted from 1573 to 1825 in Potosí, the largest mint during the colonial period, would have been widely recognized throughout the North American colonies.[citation needed]

    Alternatively, the $ symbol derives from the scroll on the pillar, on the reverse of the "pillar dollar" variety of pieces of eight.
    Greek mythology

    Another theory is that the dollar sign may have also originated from Hermes, the Greek god of bankers, thieves, messengers, and tricksters: Besides the crane, one of his symbols was the caduceus, a staff from which ribbons or snakes dangled in a sinuous curve.
    Alchemic sigil for cinnabar

    A symbol virtually identical to dollar sign has been used as an alchemic sigil for cinnabar dating at least as far back as the early eighteenth century, although this has not been proposed as an origin of the dollar sign. [9]
    Drawn with two vertical lines
    See also: Cifrão
    Spanish coat of arms
    The Pillars of Hercules with a small "S" shaped ribbon around in the City of Seville, Spain (16th Century).

    A common theory holds that it derives from the Spanish coat of arms engraved on the colonial silver coins, the reals, (among them the Spanish dollar) that were in circulation in Spain's colonies in America and Asia. Reals and Spanish dollars were also legal tender in the English colonies in North America, which later became part of the United States and Canada.

    In 1492, Ferdinand II of Aragon adopted the symbol of the Pillars of Hercules and added the Latin phrase Non plus ultra meaning "nothing further beyond", indicating "this is the end of the (known) world." But when Christopher Columbus came to America, the legend was changed to Plus ultra: "further beyond."
    Spain's coat of arms

    The symbol was adopted by Charles V and was part of his coat of arms representing Spain's American possessions. The symbol was later stamped on coins minted in gold and silver. These coins, depicting the Pillars of Hercules over two hemispheres and a small "S"-shaped ribbon around each, were spread throughout America, Europe and Asia. For the sake of simplicity, traders wrote signs that, instead of saying dollar or peso, had this symbol made by hand, and this in turn evolved into a simple S with two vertical bars.
    From "U.S."

    A dollar sign with two vertical lines is a monogram of U.S., used on money bags issued by the United States Mint. The letters U and S superimposed resemble the historical double stroke dollar sign mathrm{S}!!!Vert: the bottom of the 'U' disappears into the bottom curve of the 'S', leaving two vertical lines. This theory does not consider the fact that the symbol was already in use before the formation of the United States.[10]

    This theory is referred to by the character Owen Kellogg in Ayn Rand's novel "Atlas Shrugged", giving it credence and a degree of popularity among the novel's fans.
    "Unit of silver"

    Another theory is that it derives from "unit of silver", each unit being one "bit" of the "pieces of eight". Before the American Revolution, prices were often quoted in units of the Spanish dollar. According to this theory, when a price was quoted the capital 'S' was used to indicate silver with a capital 'U' written on top to indicate units. Eventually the capital 'U' was replaced by double vertical hash marks.[citation needed]
    German thaler

    Another hypothesis is that it derives from the symbol used on a German Thaler. According to Ovason (2004), on one type of thaler one side showed the crucified Christ while the other showed a serpent hanging from a cross, the letters NU near the serpent's head, and on the other side of the cross the number 21. This refers to the Bible, Numbers, Chapter 21 (see Nehushtan).
    Roman sestertius

    There is a theory that the dollar sign goes back to the most important Roman coin, the sestertius, which had the letters 'HS' as its currency sign. When superimposed these letters form a dollar sign with two vertical strokes (the horizontal line of the 'H' merging into the 'S').
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 20, 2012 4:35 PM GMT
    The dollar sign appears as early as 1847 on the $100 Mexican War notes and the reverse of the 1869 $1000 United States note.[12] The dollar sign also appears on the reverse of the 1934 $100,000 note as well as the reverse of the 1917 $1 note.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dollar_sign
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Aug 20, 2012 4:37 PM GMT
    There is no dollar symbol on the actual currency ... is there?

    Everything used to cost 'cents' so they made a c with a slash through it to distinguish it from a regular alpha character and the dollar symbol came from the first letter in Satan and being a Christian nation, they crossed it out, as in 'No Satan', and that is also why the include 'In God We Trust'. Over the years they start putting 2 lines through it ... like in 'double no satan'

    ya ... I was there icon_twisted.gif
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Aug 20, 2012 4:41 PM GMT
    BuggEyedSprite saidAnd when did the 'cent' symbol disappear?! icon_eek.gif

    When America finally lost all it's Sense (cents) .... of course
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    Aug 20, 2012 8:24 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidThere is no dollar symbol on the actual currency ... is there?


    No. (Good quiz question.) I would have sworn there was. Bank of England banknotes do carry the £ symbol though.
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    Aug 21, 2012 1:22 AM GMT
    kesha's mother draw and design it.
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    Aug 21, 2012 1:36 AM GMT
    When rap artists started using it jewelry.
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    Aug 21, 2012 2:27 AM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    AMoonHawk saidThere is no dollar symbol on the actual currency ... is there?


    No. (Good quiz question.) I would have sworn there was. Bank of England banknotes do carry the £ symbol though.

    Currently, there is only a $ on the dollar coins. But I'm not sure they are still making those since they stopped the presidential dollar coin series. They may be still making the Native American $1 Coin. They have the $ on the back, too.