Architects

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    Aug 16, 2008 12:58 AM GMT
    So which of you are architects/studying architecture?
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    Aug 16, 2008 2:28 AM GMT
    I'm an architect. Why do you ask?
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    Aug 16, 2008 5:08 AM GMT
    landscape architect here...
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    Aug 16, 2008 8:14 AM GMT
    Landscape Architect here..........
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    Aug 16, 2008 1:42 PM GMT
    Hey guys. I was just curious to see who else was interested in the career I'll have someday.

    Wow, Terry, that's really impressive. You must be so proud! Do you have any photos of any of the work you've done in the past?

    No, I don't go to RISD, I got to Roger Williams, but I have friends who attend RISD.
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    Aug 16, 2008 2:34 PM GMT
    I don't have my license, but I have an architecture degree. Does that count? he he!

    I'm designing a new house for my brother right now (which is pretty fun) and looking for full time work which isn't easy at the moment. Anyone know of someone in the South Florida market looking for an architect or construction manager? Send me their info please. icon_smile.gif

    Good luck in school, Rand. The time I spent in school were the best years of my life. Make the best of them.
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    Aug 16, 2008 3:10 PM GMT
    Rand saidSo which of you are architects/studying architecture?



    Architect here. Finished studying years ago.
    It's been a mixture of pleasure and utter frustration for me.
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    Aug 18, 2008 7:37 PM GMT
    I will add that during summers off while you're in school, you should try to work in an architect's office. Most of these positions are "internships," so you won't get paid, but the experience will help you start your career once you get your degree. You might also consider working on a construction crew, so you can see how drawings become a building and find out how things get done in the field.
    Architecture school will introduce you to a wide range of practices: the history of architecture; structures class, where you learn the physics of building materials; building science class, where you learn how buildings go together and how to size and determine building systems; and, of course, design, hopefully learning what your own design ideas are and developing them more fully.
    You might find you like structures so much you'll want to be an engineer. Or, some other aspect of the profession might steer you in an unanticipated direction. Keep your mind open to the chance that, in studying architecture, you will find something that you like even more. Good luck in starting your education, I envy you. - Barry
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    Aug 18, 2008 7:41 PM GMT
    ursamajor saidRay Eames


    Dude! Awesome!
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:05 PM GMT
    Olmstead is a hero to me. I've been toying with returning to school for landscape architecture, but am somewhat afraid that I'll end up in a shitty job designing the next cookie cutter subdivision or office park. It would take a lot of vigilance to practice my interests (ecology and habitat restoration) in the landscape architecture world. I may be better off just getting my landscape designer certification (currently what I'm working on).

    Still, I dream of designing the perfect urban park someday.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:12 PM GMT
    XRuggerATX saidOlmstead is a hero to me. I've been toying with returning to school for landscape architecture, but am somewhat afraid that I'll end up in a shitty job designing the next cookie cutter subdivision or office park. It would take a lot of vigilance to practice my interests (ecology and habitat restoration) in the landscape architecture world. I may be better off just getting my landscape designer certification (currently what I'm working on).

    Still, I dream of designing the perfect urban park someday.


    GO FOR IT! It's a great field to be in. However, you are correct about getting stuck in a firm designing cookie cutter stuff and not getting the opportunity to do the creative things you want.

    That's why you have to find a better way for yourself and find your niche...start your own business or consulting.

    Here in NYC, there are fantastic examples of Olmstead's work....Central Park being the most famous. There are also scores of "pocket parks" all over Manhattan and other parts of the city. Usually, a builder will promise to put in a small outdoor area for the general public to enjoy....places to have lunch and chill....some terrific projects.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:18 PM GMT
    KissingPro saidUsually, a builder will promise to put in a small outdoor area for the general public to enjoy....places to have lunch and chill....some terrific projects.


    I think you meant, "usually, a builder will agree to put in a small outdoor area after being forced to by the planning commission in order to get approval for their project."

    I know there are some good builders, but most I've worked with don't voluntarily do things like that unless they can make money off of it or are forced to by the city.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:23 PM GMT
    KissingPro said
    XRuggerATX saidOlmstead is a hero to me. I've been toying with returning to school for landscape architecture, but am somewhat afraid that I'll end up in a shitty job designing the next cookie cutter subdivision or office park. It would take a lot of vigilance to practice my interests (ecology and habitat restoration) in the landscape architecture world. I may be better off just getting my landscape designer certification (currently what I'm working on).

    Still, I dream of designing the perfect urban park someday.


    GO FOR IT! It's a great field to be in. However, you are correct about getting stuck in a firm designing cookie cutter stuff and not getting the opportunity to do the creative things you want.

    That's why you have to find a better way for yourself and find your niche...start your own business or consulting.

    Here in NYC, there are fantastic examples of Olmstead's work....Central Park being the most famous. There are also scores of "pocket parks" all over Manhattan and other parts of the city. Usually, a builder will promise to put in a small outdoor area for the general public to enjoy....places to have lunch and chill....some terrific projects.


    Thanks. I really do think if I do this I'd be doing it in my own company. Risky, but more rewarding (as things typically go). UTexas has a pretty eco-friendly program, but still, so much development here is sprawl oriented. And when you have to pay the bills, you start making compromises. So I think there's a self-trust issue at play for me as well.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:26 PM GMT
    halltd said
    KissingPro saidUsually, a builder will promise to put in a small outdoor area for the general public to enjoy....places to have lunch and chill....some terrific projects.


    I think you meant, "usually, a builder will agree to put in a small outdoor area after being forced to by the planning commission in order to get approval for their project."

    I know there are some good builders, but most I've worked with don't voluntarily do things like that unless they can make money off of it or are forced to by the city.


    I went to a conservation development conference and it was argued, rather compellingly, that building a neighborhood around open spaces, preserves, and greenbelts is more profitable that building around a golf course. Not that enough developers would show up to such a conference to actually hear it. Oh well.

    Inertia sucks sometimes.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:30 PM GMT
    Rugger and other guys -

    Cookie cutter suburbs and office parks are in NEED of people to make them over and use better adapted plants, less water, more in tune with their surroundings..rock outcrops, higlight a drainage creek with boulders and lunch areas with benches, etc. Incorporate interesting/artistic and eco friendly lanscaping into buildings...medians...along sidewalks..
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:40 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]XRuggerATX said[/cite]
    halltd said
    KissingPro saidUsually, a builder will promise to put in a small outdoor area for the general public to enjoy....places to have lunch and chill....some terrific projects.


    I think you meant, "usually, a builder will agree to put in a small outdoor area after being forced to by the planning commission in order to get approval for their project."


    Yes, I meant to say it that way......I don't think any builder will voluntarilly do it...they get zoning breaks and other considerations.

    But I think the public benefits anyway.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:41 PM GMT
    Mikesw saidRugger and other guys -

    Cookie cutter suburbs and office parks are in NEED of people to make them over and use better adapted plants, less water, more in tune with their surroundings..rock outcrops, higlight a drainage creek with boulders and lunch areas with benches, etc. Incorporate interesting/artistic and eco friendly lanscaping into buildings...medians...along sidewalks..


    MikeSW: The landscape architect ignored our advice after initially asking for our input on a new park for a village-turned-retail-mecca about 15 miles west of Austin. I believe you are intimately familiar with the place I'm talking about.

    And what was done to that general area is a travesty. One commercial developer built their "town center" for them, and Simon Properties ran like wildfire across the street. The new town hall for this former "village" is flanked by a Chili's and a Ross, with Lowe's as a backdrop, or some such ugliness. And way too much parking in all the wrong places. If you dare walk to or around this area, watch out. It is almost prohibitive without being inside an internal combustion powered device.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:41 PM GMT
    XRuggerATX said
    I went to a conservation development conference and it was argued, rather compellingly, that building a neighborhood around open spaces, preserves, and greenbelts is more profitable that building around a golf course. Not that enough developers would show up to such a conference to actually hear it. Oh well.

    Inertia sucks sometimes.


    I totally agree with you. I'm a huge supporter of green building, LEED, and other non-traditional design. I know what the benefits are. But, the non-creative builder/developer types can't think outside their box. Since they are the ones with all the money and power, they decide what gets built unfortunately. Hopefully one day I can be my own developer and build attractive, earth-conscious and beautiful places to live.
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    Aug 18, 2008 8:47 PM GMT
    small "a" architect (not licensed) and getting out of the field. Somehow it's less appealing now that I don't work with sundayswim any more ;)

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    Aug 18, 2008 9:05 PM GMT
    rugger -

    bee caves..could have been something really cool...but its a nightmare now. poorly planned. but that's due to village leaders getting lots of "gifts" from developers, which is...not unlike anywhere else where such poorly planned developement takes place.

    my biggest gripe - would be the parking lots. same with target and home depot on 620. they bulldozed hundreds of old oaks. didnt even leave any for shade.

    they could have made some man made areas like in front of whole foods - stream, rocks, tables, etc, at least hinting to the fact they are out in the country.

    that is why its important for landscapers to keep going/pushing and hopefully influence future projects as the city swells westward so that some of them really fit in with minimal impact.

    thats my biggest gripe..the overall lack of good planning and zoning - especially out in the hill country, where anyone can just bulldoze and scrape hills away and do whatever they want (like another 6 acre U-Store-it metal building with a chain linked fence).
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    Aug 18, 2008 10:24 PM GMT
    Holy Shit, that is where I grew up. I used to drive down Bee Caves road with my dad in his MGB with the top down. It was a beautiful place. It was already obvious when I left Austin in 1984 that it was going to go like this. What a shame.

    Terry
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    Aug 18, 2008 10:49 PM GMT
    My favorite architecture style (for homes) are the simple post and beams with walls of glass from the 50's..there are tons of them in the hills around LA and in Palm Springs by various architects. I would love to own one, but they are so expensive. Because of the ease of construction and open, bright plans, I dont understand why they are not used in mainstream housing more (today) - as opposed to your basic red brick, hip roofed house you see all over the country.
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    Aug 18, 2008 11:12 PM GMT
    Architecture is truly a gentleman's profession. Meaning you practice it as a profession and derive your income in some other way. In many cases it means marring a rich or well connected wife...like Frank Lloyd Wright or you can just be born wealthy like Philip Johnson.
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    Aug 18, 2008 11:59 PM GMT
    Mikesw saidMy favorite architecture style (for homes) are the simple post and beams with walls of glass from the 50's..there are tons of them in the hills around LA and in Palm Springs by various architects.


    Mike - You're most likely referring to homes designed by Joseph Eichler. The reason they're so expensive now is because Eichler was a visionary in his time. His modernist homes are icons now and are therefore quite expensive. Like you though, I wish more people built houses in this same style today.
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    Aug 19, 2008 12:06 AM GMT
    Actually Eichler was a superb salesman and he knew how to hire talent . His early homes done without talent were pretty awful. A.Q. Jones ( Emmons and Jones) and Anshen and Allen were the Architects behind the great California Modern post and beam housing experiments.