NEEDED: SUNSCREEN RECOMMENDATIONS!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2008 2:22 AM GMT
    Hey guys,

    I'm going to the beach tomorrow and need some advice. As you all might already know, "black don't crack" icon_wink.gif, but it sure does burn. Anyway, I was overwhelmed by the sunscreen options at my local drugstore and need some feedback before returning to pick something up.

    Should I do a lotion or spray?

    Should I go Coppertone, Neutrogena, or Aveeno?

    I know I want a high SPF. Coppertone peaks at 50, while both Neutrogena and Aveeno go up to 70.

    Thanks.
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    Aug 17, 2008 2:40 AM GMT
    Bump.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2008 3:00 AM GMT
    Actually, there is a controversary over sunscreen, because once it penetrates your skin it actually increases the chances for the most lethal form of skin cancer

    Controversy over sunscreen

    The statement that "sunburn causes skin cancer" is adequate when it refers to basal-cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. But it is false when it comes to malignant melanoma (see picture: UVR sunburn melanoma).[10] The statistical correlation between sunburn and melanoma is due to a common cause — the UV-radiation. However, they are generated via two different mechanisms direct DNA damage is ascribed by many medical doctors to a change in behaviour of the sunscreen user due to a false sense of security afforded by the sunscreen. (Other researchers blame insufficient correction for confounding factors; light skinned individuals versus indirect DNA damage).

    Topically applied sunscreens block the UV rays as long as they do not penetrate into the skin. This prevents sunburn, suntanning, and skin cancer. If however the sunscreen filter is absorbed into the skin it only prevents the sunburn but it increases the amount of free radicals which in turn increases the risk for malignant melanoma. The harmful effect of photoexcited sunscreen filters on living tissue has been shown in many photobiological studies.[11][12][13][14] Whether sunscreen prevents or promotes the development of melanoma depends on the relative importance of the protective effect from the topical sunscreen and the harmful effects of the absorbed sunscreen.

    The use of sunscreen is known to prevent the direct DNA damage that causes sunburn and the two most common forms of skin cancer, basal-cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.[15] However, if sunscreen penetrates into the skin, it promotes the indirect DNA damages, which cause the most lethal form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma.[16] This form of skin cancer is rare, but it is responsible for 75% of all skin cancer-related deaths. Increased risk of malignant melanoma in sunscreen users has been the subject of many epidemiological studies.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunburn#Controversy_over_sunscreen
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2008 4:00 AM GMT
    Thanks, Caslon.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Aug 17, 2008 4:03 AM GMT
    I like Coppertone Sport. If I'm out in the sun like that, I'm usually participating in some sort of sport. I can't stand for the sunscreen to get runny, so I like the sweatproof properties.
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    Aug 17, 2008 2:17 PM GMT
    Whatever you get, make sure you get something that says broad spectrum protection. That will protect you from both UVB and AVA rays. Apparently SPF ratings only relate to UVB protection.

    In addition to what Caslon mentioned, there are some concerns about some of the ingredients and their unknown effects on humans. Some environmental group ran tests to find what it considers the safest sunscreens. Here are the results of that.

    Basically they prefer the sunscreens that contain zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. Based on their recommendation, I tried Badger brand, number 5 on their list. I would not recommend it. It left me looking like a corpse (because the zinc oxide doesn't get absorbed) and was difficult to get off both my skin and clothes.

    The Washington Post just had an article on sunscreen written by a dermatologist. Here's what she recommends:

    Blue Lizard Baby and Sensitive Skin sunscreens SPF 30+
    California Baby sunscreen lotion SPF 30+
    Vanicream sunscreen Sport SPF 35 and Sensitive Skin SPF 30
    EltaMD UV physical sunscreen
    Olay Complete Defense Daily Moisturizer SPF 30
    Neutrogena Healthy Defense Facial Moisturizer SPF 45
    CVS Sunscreen with Zinc Oxide SPF 45


    Finally one last thing to consider - the environmental impact of sunscreen. A study released earlier this year showed that sunscreen may be responsible for killing coral. Apparently getting a biodegradable sunscreen is the thing to do if you are going to be in the ocean and concerned about that.

    I've been trying to find a sunscreen that takes care of all these concerns in preparation for a trip to Puerto Vallarta, where reef damage is a concern. I just started my research a few days ago, but so far California Baby seems to be at the top of my list.
  • MuslDrew

    Posts: 463

    Aug 17, 2008 2:26 PM GMT
    I've been using Blue Lizard, but now I'll look for CA Baby. Thanks for the info!
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Aug 17, 2008 2:28 PM GMT
    I like Aveeno's products.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2008 3:17 PM GMT
    I burn easily (within 30 min). I've found that applying a sunscreen lotion, after my shower, works best. I still need to reapply frequently and it always seems to find its way into my eyes.

    I tried the Neutrogena spray (45 with helioplex) and it did not work at all.

    I'll try some of the products mentioned above.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2008 3:33 PM GMT
    madtown saidWhatever you get, make sure you get something that says broad spectrum protection. That will protect you from both UVB and AVA rays. Apparently SPF ratings only relate to UVB protection.

    In addition to what Caslon mentioned, there are some concerns about some of the ingredients and their unknown effects on humans. Some environmental group ran tests to find what it considers the safest sunscreens. Here are the results of that.

    Basically they prefer the sunscreens that contain zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. Based on their recommendation, I tried Badger brand, number 5 on their list. I would not recommend it. It left me looking like a corpse (because the zinc oxide doesn't get absorbed) and was difficult to get off both my skin and clothes.

    The Washington Post just had an article by a dermatologist on sunscreen. Here's what she recommends:

    Blue Lizard Baby and Sensitive Skin sunscreens SPF 30+
    California Baby sunscreen lotion SPF 30+
    Vanicream sunscreen Sport SPF 35 and Sensitive Skin SPF 30
    EltaMD UV physical sunscreen
    Olay Complete Defense Daily Moisturizer SPF 30
    Neutrogena Healthy Defense Facial Moisturizer SPF 45
    CVS Sunscreen with Zinc Oxide SPF 45


    Finally one last thing to consider - the environmental impact of sunscreen. A study released earlier this year showed that sunscreen may be responsible for killing coral. Apparently getting a biodegradable sunscreen is the thing to do if you are going to be in the ocean and concerned about that.

    I've been trying to find a sunscreen that takes care of all these concerns in preparation for a trip to Puerto Vallarta, where reef damage is a concern. I just started my research a few days ago, but so far California Baby seems to be at the top of my list.


    Thanks. Unfortunately (for the coral), I'm not not a staunch environmentalist. icon_lol.gif