Engineering challenge of the day.

  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Aug 26, 2012 4:32 AM GMT
    I have been congitating how to construct the tower in the image below. The tower terrace deck sits approximately 70 feet above the basement pad at ground level. It could be framed in steel and covered in veneer like the rest of the home or since the walls will be poured anyway, the tower can perhaps be one tall post tension box with hanging floors.

    Do we have a structural engineer or two on RJ?

    Photobucket
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    Aug 26, 2012 4:55 AM GMT
    1. This thread is absolute proof that you're not an structural engineer. No real structural engineer would ask an exclusively gay forum for advice. The real ones value advice from many other sources...not just their peers.

    2. Your pictures shows a structure of equally machined objects (squares, rectangles, etc). That is more outdated than the pyramids of Egypt. If you want a structure that'll outlast nature's elements, the design must be made of unequal elements. That's the only way to avoid slippage during a natural disaster.
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:43 AM GMT
    WhyWhySee saidThe plans don't explain it?
    http://www.archivaldesigns.com/houseplan_details.php?planname=Balmoral
    That only shows floor plans...marketing value. It does not show structural stability, which is important to an engineer.
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:59 AM GMT
    WhyWhySee saidWhen we buy house plans they have all the engineering figured out.


    No... I had to pay extra for that. Although I'm sure they just had to plug in a few variables like soil properties and wind loads.
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    Aug 26, 2012 7:48 AM GMT
    Probably not a good idea. After Mario and Luigi rescue Princess Peach from the tower, they're going to blow that shit up.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 26, 2012 1:41 PM GMT
    xrichx saidProbably not a good idea. After Mario and Luigi rescue Princess Peach from the tower, they're going to blow that shit up.


    +1
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    Aug 26, 2012 2:41 PM GMT
    xrichx saidProbably not a good idea. After Mario and Luigi rescue Princess Peach from the tower, they're going to blow that shit up.


    LOLicon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 26, 2012 3:16 PM GMT
    I am not a structural engineer, but I am pretty sure a tower in the Scottish Baronial style has no place in the Deep South.
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    Aug 26, 2012 4:02 PM GMT
    Im a chemical engineer. I can help you build a bomb and blow the place up if you want?.

    I know our Faculty building has quite a ranged hanging floor type scheme. Some things to consider would be compression forces due to wind. I know we include this into distillation column designs etc. Also, you should be worried about what sort of foundations are set and whether the basement supporting structures are rated for higher loads.

    Using steel framing would offer strength as well as flexibility for weather effects (gusts of wind) but I doubt it would provide a stable enough support for veneer. It is a cheap option I suppose but risky and 21m (70ft) long term durability.

    Anyways, what do I know. I think paulflexes is more qualified in that field than me, and honest. ;)
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Aug 26, 2012 5:15 PM GMT
    paulflexes said1. This thread is absolute proof that you're not an structural engineer. No real structural engineer would ask an exclusively gay forum for advice. The real ones value advice from many other sources...not just their peers.

    2. Your pictures shows a structure of equally machined objects (squares, rectangles, etc). That is more outdated than the pyramids of Egypt. If you want a structure that'll outlast nature's elements, the design must be made of unequal elements. That's the only way to avoid slippage during a natural disaster.


    Did I not ask: "Do we have a structural engineer or two on RJ"
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Aug 26, 2012 5:28 PM GMT
    I'll inline my comments here.


    biguy1on1 saidIm a chemical engineer. I can help you build a bomb and blow the place up if you want?.

    I know our Faculty building has quite a ranged hanging floor type scheme. Some things to consider would be compression forces due to wind. I know we include this into distillation column designs etc. Also, you should be worried about what sort of foundations are set and whether the basement supporting structures are rated for higher loads.


    It actually is conceptually like the distillation column. Easily modeled in ProEngineer by the way. Pouring the walls with SCC containing steel fibers along with 'rockbar' I think would do the trick.

    ChE's go through statics and dynamics I believe. Within your reach.


    biguy1on1 saidUsing steel framing would offer strength as well as flexibility for weather effects (gusts of wind) but I doubt it would provide a stable enough support for veneer. It is a cheap option I suppose but risky and 21m (70ft) long term durability.


    Not steel studs. Red iron.

    biguy1on1 saidAnyways, what do I know. I think paulflexes is more qualified in that field than me, and honest. ;)


    Paul is just being an angry liberal these days. Paul is also probably well qualified at bar fights. Does that give prudence to his comments? :-)
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Aug 26, 2012 5:34 PM GMT
    WhyWhySee saidThe plans don't explain it?
    http://www.archivaldesigns.com/houseplan_details.php?planname=Balmoral


    Archival is a design house. The home is large enough and with such features as the tower that most counties require it to be handed off to a structural engineer. Obviously, I started this thread in order to see if there were any guys on RJ working in this area, i.e. structura engineering. Although I appreciate your input, this thread is typically what one would expect from the RJ crowd.

    Perhaps the commentary as always becomes ad hominem, rather than productive. I think it in my nature however to hope there is something worthwhile on RJ. One good response on any thread is enough. And that we received from an engineer. I think he may be an individual who can "stretch his wings."

    By the way, the Archival site is well worth a visit. Particularly the photos of as built homes. Amazing what effort can bring.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:40 PM GMT
    a sanitation engineer can help you throw it in the trash
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    Aug 26, 2012 7:36 PM GMT
    Why don't you use the free market and call some structural engineers and pay them for their expert advice?
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    Aug 27, 2012 5:08 PM GMT
    okay, have you thought about flying buttresses?