What book are you reading or what book did you last read

  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Aug 26, 2012 4:53 AM GMT
    I wanted to know who are the book worms on here. I enjoy reading books for fun, but I have not done so much of it this summer. I wanted to get back on my routine before school starts next week, so I am reading beyond good and evil. What book are you reading? How did you find it so far?
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:04 AM GMT
    Historical Linguistics: An Introduction
    Lyle Campbell

    "This accessible, hands-on text not only introduces students to the important topics in historical linguistics but also shows them how to apply the methods described and how to think about the issues; abundant examples and exercises allow students to focus on how to do historical linguistics. Distinctive to this text is its integration of the standard topics with others now considered important to the field, including syntactic change, grammaticalization, sociolinguistic contributions to linguistic change, distant genetic relationships, areal linguistics, and linguistic prehistory. Examples are taken from a broad range of languages; those from the more familiar English, French, German, and Spanish make the topics more accessible, while those from non-Indo-European languages show the depth and range of the concepts they illustrate.This second edition features expanded explanations and examples as well as updates in light of recent work in linguistics, including a defense of the family tree model, a response to recent claims on lexical diffusion/frequency, and a section on why languages diversify and spread."


  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Aug 26, 2012 5:18 AM GMT
    Caslon20000 saidHistorical Linguistics: An Introduction
    Lyle Campbell

    "This accessible, hands-on text not only introduces students to the important topics in historical linguistics but also shows them how to apply the methods described and how to think about the issues; abundant examples and exercises allow students to focus on how to do historical linguistics. Distinctive to this text is its integration of the standard topics with others now considered important to the field, including syntactic change, grammaticalization, sociolinguistic contributions to linguistic change, distant genetic relationships, areal linguistics, and linguistic prehistory. Examples are taken from a broad range of languages; those from the more familiar English, French, German, and Spanish make the topics more accessible, while those from non-Indo-European languages show the depth and range of the concepts they illustrate.This second edition features expanded explanations and examples as well as updates in light of recent work in linguistics, including a defense of the family tree model, a response to recent claims on lexical diffusion/frequency, and a section on why languages diversify and spread."




    Sounds very interesting. Is more of a textbook for linguistics students then?
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:21 AM GMT
    It's been a while since I've read a novel-- manga volumes don't count right? The last book I read was "Ring" by Koji Suzuki. It's the book the Japanese Ringu movie is based upon.
  • JockChefJim

    Posts: 373

    Aug 26, 2012 5:22 AM GMT
    Currently reading Star Wars: Force Unleashed II. Before that was Doctor Who: The Krillitane Storm. Tes.....I am a Sy-Fy geek. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:23 AM GMT
    On the Road- Jack Kerouac

    I started recently and haven't gone heaps into it yet. Unfortunately i've been reading quite sporadically but so far, it's really nice and makes you appreciate adventure/liberation.
  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Aug 26, 2012 5:28 AM GMT
    JockChefJim saidCurrently reading Star Wars: Force Unleashed II. Before that was Doctor Who: The Krillitane Storm. Tes.....I am a Sy-Fy geek. icon_biggrin.gif


    Those are all very good books. I don't read sy fy much, but when I do, the books are very good. I can't read books that are either too fast in plot or too slow. I mostly read naturalistic fictions or romantazie ones.
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:31 AM GMT
    I try to alternate between fiction and non-fiction.

    I finished Trial Junkies by Robert Gregory Browne. Starting The Amateur by Edward Klein.
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:31 AM GMT
    O5vx said
    Caslon20000 saidHistorical Linguistics: An Introduction
    Lyle Campbell

    "This accessible, hands-on text not only introduces students to the important topics in historical linguistics but also shows them how to apply the methods described and how to think about the issues; abundant examples and exercises allow students to focus on how to do historical linguistics. Distinctive to this text is its integration of the standard topics with others now considered important to the field, including syntactic change, grammaticalization, sociolinguistic contributions to linguistic change, distant genetic relationships, areal linguistics, and linguistic prehistory. Examples are taken from a broad range of languages; those from the more familiar English, French, German, and Spanish make the topics more accessible, while those from non-Indo-European languages show the depth and range of the concepts they illustrate.This second edition features expanded explanations and examples as well as updates in light of recent work in linguistics, including a defense of the family tree model, a response to recent claims on lexical diffusion/frequency, and a section on why languages diversify and spread."




    Sounds very interesting. Is more of a textbook for linguistics students then?

    Apparently. I'm just reading it.
  • Tiran

    Posts: 227

    Aug 26, 2012 5:41 AM GMT
    Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente

    "Koschei the Deathless is to Russian folklore what devils or wicked witches are to European culture: a menacing, evil figure; the villain of countless stories which have been passed on through story and text for generations. But Koschei has never before been seen through the eyes of Catherynne Valente, whose modernized and transformed take on the legend brings the action to modern times, spanning many of the great developments of Russian history in the twentieth century.

    Deathless, however, is no dry, historical tome: it lights up like fire as the young Marya Morevna transforms from a clever child of the revolution, to Koschei’s beautiful bride, to his eventual undoing. Along the way there are Stalinist house elves, magical quests, secrecy and bureaucracy, and games of lust and power. All told, Deathless is a collision of magical history and actual history, of revolution and mythology, of love and death, which will bring Russian myth back to life in a stunning new incarnation."
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:46 AM GMT
    Meh. I suppose Kerouac was interesting when read in his time. Reading him now - or even 30 years ago - he comes across as just another narcissistic twit.

    I haven't read anything worth recommending in the last few weeks. Trudged through Leyner's The Sugar Frosted Nutsack. Self-indulgant tripe. I keep reading his stuff, hoping for some return to his earlier brilliance. But he continues to fuck with us instead.
    Started in on Chabon's The Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. A nice return to actual narrative, but too early to say much about it.
    Other than that, I've just been skimming journal articles and spending my time outside enjoying the summer.
  • jb63piedmont

    Posts: 42

    Aug 26, 2012 5:47 AM GMT
    Just finished a book called "Outlaw Marriages" (I think was the title) about long-term, famous, same-sex couples over about the last 100 years or so. Enlightening. Before that read "Sons & Lovers" by D.H. Lawrence

    To WhyWhySee: "The Velvet Rage" really opened my eyes to a lot of things, quite a bit about my own behavior/personality. I highly recommend it.
  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Aug 26, 2012 5:48 AM GMT
    Tiran saidDeathless by Catherynne M. Valente

    "Koschei the Deathless is to Russian folklore what devils or wicked witches are to European culture: a menacing, evil figure; the villain of countless stories which have been passed on through story and text for generations. But Koschei has never before been seen through the eyes of Catherynne Valente, whose modernized and transformed take on the legend brings the action to modern times, spanning many of the great developments of Russian history in the twentieth century.

    Deathless, however, is no dry, historical tome: it lights up like fire as the young Marya Morevna transforms from a clever child of the revolution, to Koschei’s beautiful bride, to his eventual undoing. Along the way there are Stalinist house elves, magical quests, secrecy and bureaucracy, and games of lust and power. All told, Deathless is a collision of magical history and actual history, of revolution and mythology, of love and death, which will bring Russian myth back to life in a stunning new incarnation."


    Now this sound really interesting. I don't usually read things like this, but this one sound good.
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    Aug 26, 2012 5:49 AM GMT
    Dudes who read are so sexy haha. I had a great conversation on The Fool by Dostoyevsky at a bar last weekend. Currently reading The Plague by Albert Camus. I wish we had a RJ bookclub.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:04 AM GMT
    The Mouse That Roared by H. H. Stinson (one of the founders of Planned Parenthood here in San Mateo, CA). Fascinating woman and a personal friend - and a great writer IMO. I'm enjoying her book - detailing all she went through to help put Planned Parenthood together and the reasons why it was so important to her.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:05 AM GMT
    Managed to complete the dust jacket of "Geography of the Heart" by Fenton Johnson this morning. So many books, so little time. icon_sad.gif
  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Aug 26, 2012 6:07 AM GMT
    The last book I read this year is called Slave: My true story. It was a very sad story about a girl from Sudan who was enslave by people she works for. It is a true story and it is by Mende Nazer.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:08 AM GMT
    The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, for fun. For school I am reading Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Aug 26, 2012 6:10 AM GMT
    turbobilly saidManaged to complete the dust jacket of "Geography of the Heart" by Fenton Johnson this morning. So many books, so little time. icon_sad.gif


    Ikr, I feel really weird missing two weeks of reading.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:11 AM GMT
    rondan saidThe Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, for fun. For school I am reading Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad


    HoD is actually one of my favorites. The novella is written behind this literary cloud that you spend the whole time trying to penetrate and follow. Man, I've read that one like a dozen times.
  • O5vx

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    Aug 26, 2012 6:11 AM GMT
    rondan saidThe Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, for fun. For school I am reading Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad


    Sorry, but I find heart of darkness racist.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:14 AM GMT
    "The Art of War" and "Homer's Iliad"
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:14 AM GMT
    O5vx said
    rondan saidThe Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, for fun. For school I am reading Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad


    Sorry, but I find heart of darkness racist.

    oh lord.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:15 AM GMT
    huhwhat said
    rondan saidThe Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, for fun. For school I am reading Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad


    HoD is actually one of my favorites. The novella is written behind this literary cloud that you spend the whole time trying to penetrate and follow. Man, I've read that one like a dozen times.


    This is actually the first time I am reading it so far, I cant tell if its because I have to plow through it that I am not really enjoying it. But more to come on that.

    O5vx, reading it for school not by choice.
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    Aug 26, 2012 6:15 AM GMT
    Jockbod48 saidThe Mouse That Roared by H. H. Stinson (one of the founders of Planned Parenthood here in San Mateo, CA). Fascinating woman and a personal friend - and a great writer IMO. I'm enjoying her book - detailing all she went through to help put Planned Parenthood together and the reasons why it was so important to her.


    Odd... The Mouse That Roared by Wibberley (and the subsequent movie and it's sequels) is one of my favorite slim little books. Amazing how it never gets dated.