Super-fast MIT camera catches light in motion

  • spacemagic

    Posts: 520

    Aug 29, 2012 3:01 AM GMT
    http://www.buzzfeed.com/jwherrman/now-you-can-actually-see-light-moving-in-slow-mo

    These awesome gifs show a pulse of light traveling in slow motion. It's pretty amazing.
  • LuckyGuyKC

    Posts: 2080

    Aug 29, 2012 11:18 AM GMT
    It is so cool ..... loved watching the slow motion of the light pulses travel across the scenes.
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    Aug 29, 2012 4:23 PM GMT
    Great images. I recommend watching the TED video that accompanies it

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    Aug 29, 2012 4:44 PM GMT
    Incredible!

    And I thought my camera was fast cause it can shoot at 1/8000 sec.

    Fuck you Nikon. icon_lol.gif
  • Bicuriouscool

    Posts: 233

    Aug 29, 2012 9:19 PM GMT
    This is ridiculous. You cant see light itself because we see, even the camera sees, things by capturing reflected light. And light does not reflect light, which is essential. I mean the light which is being caught on camera should reflect the light through which we gonna see the light. And even if the photos do collide (weird assumption though), the momentum of the light being seen should change and it should no longer be in a straight line. Anyway i'll see the videos in the morning, its mid night here
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    Aug 29, 2012 9:21 PM GMT
    JustplainAlex saidGreat images. I recommend watching the TED video that accompanies it


    Hey, its Clay's last gift the NerdJocks! Brought back one more time! Revel in the awesomeness of science!
  • Bicuriouscool

    Posts: 233

    Aug 29, 2012 9:22 PM GMT
    Even if the photons*
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    Aug 29, 2012 10:01 PM GMT
    Bicuriouscool saidThis is ridiculous. You cant see light itself because we see, even the camera sees, things by capturing reflected light. And light does not reflect light, which is essential. I mean the light which is being caught on camera should reflect the light through which we gonna see the light. And even if the photos do collide (weird assumption though), the momentum of the light being seen should change and it should no longer be in a straight line. Anyway i'll see the videos in the morning, its mid night here


    That's exactly what I was thinking. It makes no sense at all. How can you see a photon if it isn't going directly to your eye/camera?
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    Aug 29, 2012 10:24 PM GMT
    SkittleGangsta said
    Bicuriouscool saidThis is ridiculous. You cant see light itself because we see, even the camera sees, things by capturing reflected light. And light does not reflect light, which is essential. I mean the light which is being caught on camera should reflect the light through which we gonna see the light. And even if the photos do collide (weird assumption though), the momentum of the light being seen should change and it should no longer be in a straight line. Anyway i'll see the videos in the morning, its mid night here


    That's exactly what I was thinking. It makes no sense at all. How can you see a photon if it isn't going directly to your eye/camera?
    Photons act like a particle and a wave simultaneously. When they collide, they split and create an interference pattern. The reason your eye (and the camera) is able to detect them is because they are splitting and bouncing everywhere as they travel.

    BTW that experiment was not just one single photon. It was a group of photons a few millimeters long, which can contain several millions of protons, if not more (haven't done the math cause I'm too lazy).
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    Aug 29, 2012 10:29 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    SkittleGangsta said
    Bicuriouscool saidThis is ridiculous. You cant see light itself because we see, even the camera sees, things by capturing reflected light. And light does not reflect light, which is essential. I mean the light which is being caught on camera should reflect the light through which we gonna see the light. And even if the photos do collide (weird assumption though), the momentum of the light being seen should change and it should no longer be in a straight line. Anyway i'll see the videos in the morning, its mid night here


    That's exactly what I was thinking. It makes no sense at all. How can you see a photon if it isn't going directly to your eye/camera?
    Photons act like a particle and a wave simultaneously. When they collide, they split and create an interference pattern. The reason your eye (and the camera) is able to detect them is because they are splitting and bouncing everywhere as they travel.

    BTW that experiment was not just one single photon. It was a group of photons a few millimeters long, which can contain several millions of protons, if not more (haven't done the math cause I'm too lazy).


    Thank you. I was going to explain but you saved me the time. Who knew Paul was smarty icon_wink.gif
  • Bicuriouscool

    Posts: 233

    Aug 29, 2012 10:48 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    SkittleGangsta said
    Bicuriouscool saidThis is ridiculous. You cant see light itself because we see, even the camera sees, things by capturing reflected light. And light does not reflect light, which is essential. I mean the light which is being caught on camera should reflect the light through which we gonna see the light. And even if the photos do collide (weird assumption though), the momentum of the light being seen should change and it should no longer be in a straight line. Anyway i'll see the videos in the morning, its mid night here


    That's exactly what I was thinking. It makes no sense at all. How can you see a photon if it isn't going directly to your eye/camera?
    Photons act like a particle and a wave simultaneously. When they collide, they split and create an interference pattern. The reason your eye (and the camera) is able to detect them is because they are splitting and bouncing everywhere as they travel.

    BTW that experiment was not just one single photon. It was a group of photons a few millimeters long, which can contain several millions of protons, if not more (haven't done the math cause I'm too lazy).

    human eyes + camera can't detect anything immediately, but through the detection of photon so as you suggest if you are seeing a photon directly you wont notice it untill it reaches the eye. Hence the particular photon can be seen only once and that is the end of that photon. And also photons don't get all splitting meaninglessly. It's when a particle gets too much energy it can split into 2 photons and vice versa. Also do refer the part on how eyes sense motion. Interference is not relevant here
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    Aug 29, 2012 10:51 PM GMT
    spacemagic saidhttp://www.buzzfeed.com/jwherrman/now-you-can-actually-see-light-moving-in-slow-mo

    These awesome gifs show a pulse of light traveling in slow motion. It's pretty amazing.


    Why do people believe any ole crap. you cannot see light. isn't this basic physics or something.
  • Bicuriouscool

    Posts: 233

    Aug 29, 2012 11:12 PM GMT
    Blondizgd said
    spacemagic saidhttp://www.buzzfeed.com/jwherrman/now-you-can-actually-see-light-moving-in-slow-mo

    These awesome gifs show a pulse of light traveling in slow motion. It's pretty amazing.


    Why do people believe any ole crap. you cannot see light. isn't this basic physics or something.

    not basic lol quantum physics is quite a complex and advanced branch of physics. And sharing new ideas is a great thing, makes you ponder over things in a new light(pun). And deepens understanding by contrast and some other such crap.